Updated on 2024/04/24

写真a

 
HOSHINO, Utsuru
 
Affiliation
Affiliated organization, Global Education Center
Job title
Assistant Professor(without tenure)
Degree
博士(スポーツ科学) ( 2019.03 Waseda University )

Professional Memberships

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    Japan Society of Sport Sociology

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    Société d’Histoire des Relations Nippo-Françaises

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    Japan Society of the History of Physical Education and Sport

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    Japan Society of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences

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    Japanese Academy of Budo

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    The Japan Society of Sport History

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Research Areas

  • Sports sciences
 

Papers

  • 中学生・高校生年代における全国競技大会の展開(1946-2001)

    中澤篤史, 星野映

    スポーツ科学研究   19   42 - 66  2022.11  [Refereed]

  • French sport and de Coubertin after World War I : until the 1924 Paris Olympic Games

    Hoshino, Utsuru

    Cultural Research of the Olympics   6 ( 6 ) 87 - 102  2021.06  [Refereed]  [Domestic journal]

    Authorship:Lead author

    CiNii

  • Coopération nippo-française à travers dans la France de Vichy : Présentation du Judo par officiels japonais

    Utsuru HOSHINO

    Etudes Françaises   ( 46 ) 3 - 13  2020.06  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

    CiNii

  • The establishment of Judo in Paris during the Occupation from 1940 to 1944: Focus on the activities of Jiu-jitsu Club de France

    Hoshino Utsuru

    Japan Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences   64 ( 1 ) 187 - 203  2019.06  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    From 1940 to 1944, Paris was occupied by the German army. The “Vichy” government began to reform sports activities for French citizens, and under the new Vichy policy, many sports saw an expansion of popularity. The expansion of judo in France during this period was particularly dramatic. This article examines how judo was practiced in German-occupied Paris, and how it acquired the status of a sport in France, with reference to the activities of the Jiu-Jitsu Club de France and its historical context in Paris at that time.<br>
    In occupied Paris, the Jiu-Jitsu Club and its judoka, especially Paul Bonét-Maury, president of the club, and Mikinosuke Kawaishi, who provided technical guidance, promoted judo as a sport. In the first half of the Occupation, the club held low-key public demonstrations. Also, practitioners in clubs were trained on the basis of teaching methods devised by Kawaishi, which included aspects such as the color belt system, and the establishment of expensive membership fees despite the Occupation situation. As a result, many intellectual professionals and industrial capitalists with economic resources played a principal role as judoka. Furthermore, by encouraging students to open new clubs, the number of judoka practicing Kawaishi judo increased. These factors remained characteristic of French judo after the Second World War.<br>
    In the latter half of the Occupation Period, the Jiu-Jitsu Club de France joined the French Wrestling Federation, so that judo became better known publicly, and in late May 1943, the First French Judo Championship was held. The Championship was held continuously in subsequent years, and received recognition of being “worthy to be aligned with other sports”.<br>
    The German army was not directly involved with judo in Paris, but the fact that the Jiu-Jitsu Club de France expanded its activities while adapting to the circumstances of the Occupation encouraged the official recognition of judo in Paris.

    DOI CiNii

  • Process of establishing the law concerning the judo professor diploma in France: Focus on discussions of the Fédération Française de Judo et Jiu-jitsu

    HOSHINO Utsuru

    Research Journal of Budo   51 ( 3 ) 143 - 159  2019.03  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    In France, the 1955 “law regulat the professor of judo and jiu-jitsu and the regulation of opening dojo” was enacted.

    In previous studies, this law has been positioned within the legal history of sports as one of the main processes of establishing a sports professor diploma. However, judo gained legal support soon after its introduction to France because it was encouraged by the French Judo and Jiu-jitsu Federation (FFJJ).

    Judo professorships were formed by Mikinosuke Kawaishi in Paris, and were structured to play the role of promoting the FFJJ’s judo dissemination policy, as “fake instructors” were beginning to appear. Therefore, the FFJJ has urged authorities to establish a diploma to regulate judo leaders since 1948. The FFJJ tried to apply the current regulations centering on the Kawaishi Method of the FFJJ to the national diploma regulations, and also to continue to take the initiative by constituting the judging committee that consists mostly of representatives of the FFJJ.

    Legislation deliberations progressed immediately after the death of a Vietnamese wrestling instructor, which occurred in June 1954. The revised bill at the Republic Council in December showed that the majority of the members of the judging committee consisted of representatives of government authorities, and members of the FFJJ. The FFJJ opposed the bill that strengthens the government’s intervention, and the National Union of Judo Professors was established to protect the interests of its members. Thus, the law of 1955 was established, and it was decided that judo cannot be taught without a professor diploma. The majority of the judging committee would also consist of representatives of government authorities.

    The 1955 law can be said to have been established in France as a means of making a living for judo instructors. Although legislation was promoted by the FFJJ, the government intervention was eventually strengthened. It can be said that this fact fixed the framework to make a living by teaching judo and created the foundations of the present French judo instructor system.

    DOI CiNii

  • The Conflict and Development of Judo in Post-World War II France: Focus on the Interrelationship between situations Internal and External to France

    HOSHINO Utsuru

    Japanese journal of sport history   31 ( 31 ) 1 - 18  2018.03  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    The purpose of this paper is to clarify how complex relationships between judo organizations and
    groups in France changed after World War II. This paper focuses on the correlations between the
    internal situations of judo in France, and the tendencies outside of France.
    <BR> The first judo federation in France was the FFJJ, which existed from 1946 to 1956. The number of
    Judoka rapidly increased in France after WWII because of the Me´thode Kawaishi, an original judo
    method invented by Mikinosuke Kawaishi. The Me´thode Kawaishi was adapted by the FFJJ as the
    official method. The centralized governance system of this method can be credited for the successful
    production of judo professors as well as the creation of judo clubs.
    <BR> However, Shudokan Club and its professors were opposed to the FFJJ as they espoused the Kodokan Judo method by Ichiro Abe, rather than the Me´thode Kawaishi. Abe influenced the rise of adherents of Kodokan judo in France. They were called “tendence Kodokan”. They opposed the technical policy and the ethical characteristics of the FFJJ, and established their own federal organization
    in 1954. This federation showed their confrontational attitude towards the FFJJ, which resulted in
    the FFJJ attempting to exclude “tendence Kodokan” at first. This decisive conflict between the FFJJ
    and Kodokan spread across the country. Ultimately, both groups concluded with an agreement for
    their unification. A new federation, la Fe´de´ration Française de Judo et Disciplines Assimile´es(FFJDA) was established in 1956.
    <BR> In the international scene, the International Judo Federation was established in 1951, with the
    first World Judo Championship being held in 1956. Moreover, the movement by the IJF to include
    judo into the Olympic program started immediately after WWII. Thus, the period of dynamic international changes surrounding judo, and the period from the end of WWII to the foundation of
    FFJDA overlapped with each other.
    <BR> The FFJJ actively worked to retain hegemony over international judo after WWII. In order to
    take the initiative within the IJF, and to facilitate the inclusion of judo in the Olympic Games, the
    FFJJ approached Japan despite the view against “tendence Kodokan” in France. The more actively
    the FFJJ worked with the IJF, the more the differences between the national situation and the international attitude stood out. The FFJJ attempted to integrate with “tendence Kodokan” by making concessions in order to resolve the conflicting situation.

    DOI CiNii

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Books and Other Publications

  • 新時代のスポーツ教育学―Neo Sport Pedagogy and Andragogy―

    小野雄大, 梶将徳( Part: Contributor, 第13章1-3節)

    小学館集英社プロダクション  2022.08 ISBN: 4796878947

    ASIN

  • フランス柔道とは何か : 教育・学校・スポーツ

    星野, 映, 中嶋, 哲也, 磯, 直樹, 小林, 純子, 有山, 篤利( Part: Joint editor)

    青弓社  2022.06 ISBN: 9784787235060

 

Syllabus

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Sub-affiliation

  • Faculty of Sport Sciences   School of Sport and Sciences

Internal Special Research Projects

  • 柔道のグローバル化と「再日本化」をめぐる日仏関係史研究

    2023  

     View Summary

    柔道は、その日本固有性を切り離しつつスポーツとしてグローバルに拡大してきた。他方で、近年フランスを中心として国際柔道連盟などでは、他のオリンピックスポーツとの差異化もあって柔道が持つ日本発祥の文化としての側面も強調するようになっている。こうした柔道のグローバルな拡がりに伴う「脱日本化」と「再日本化」の過程を、国際柔道界の「2つの中心」たる日本とフランスの関係史から明らかにしようと試みた。&nbsp;フランスは、日本に先んじて柔道の国際的な組織化の中心にあり続けてきたが、そこでは国際的な議論とフランス国内の柔道をめぐる方針が相互に連関してきた。近年の柔道の「再日本化」も同様であり、柔道の教育的価値の強調や、漢字を使った道徳規範の提示などは、いずれもフランス国内で普及したものを国際柔道連盟に採用したのである。こうした国際的な議論の場におけるフランスの姿勢は、柔道に限られたものではない。フランスは国際的なスポーツの歴史において、自らの普遍主義モデルを推進し続けてきたのであった。日仏のスポーツをめぐる関係については、1928年に東京と満洲・大連で実施された日仏対抗陸上競技が、日本で行われた最初の日仏対抗スポーツ大会として注目される。同年にアムステルダムで開催されたオリンピック大会では陸上競技・三段跳びの織田幹雄が日本代表として初めて金メダルを獲得するなど、日本にとっては欧米中心に国際スポーツ界に進出しゆく時代だった。一方のフランスは、第一次世界大戦で失墜した国家の威信を取り戻す手段の1つとして、国際スポーツ界でのイニシアチブを握ろうと試みた。そこでフランスの普遍主義モデルの推進は加速していくことになる。その1つが国際的なスポーツの組織化であり、日仏対抗競技はその顕著な例であった。近年の国際柔道の「再日本化」にも、近代スポーツの歴史におけるフランスの姿勢を明確に見て取ることができるのである。

  • 武道の教育に関する日仏比較史研究

    2021  

     View Summary

     本研究では、主に柔道に焦点を当てて日本とフランスの武道を通じた教育に関しての歴史事象を比較した。日本では大正期以降に「武道は技の稽古による教育」であるという考え方が定着していった。第二次世界大戦後に新たなスポーツとして柔道が普及したフランスでは、1980年代以降に子どもの教育に適したスポーツとしての柔道がフランス柔道連盟(FFJDA)主導で推進されていった。なかでもFFJDAが掲げた「柔道の8つの道徳規範」は、漢字とフランス語の両方で表記され、教育的な価値を明示するものとなった。現在は国際柔道連盟(IJF)においても「8つの道徳規範」が採用され、その「教育的価値」や「日本由来」という柔道の特徴を示す一要素となっている。

  • 第一次世界大戦後の日仏スポーツ交流に関する歴史学的研究

    2020  

     View Summary

     本特定課題研究では、第一次世界大戦後のスポーツを介した日仏両国の交流について、二国を取り巻く国際的なスポーツをめぐる諸条件と関連付けながら考察した。 一次大戦後はスポーツ・ナショナリズムの萌芽期であり、国家の威信を取り戻したいフランスは、国際スポーツ大会の開催を主導した。他方で、日本にとっては競技で結果を残し国際進出を強めようとしていく時期であった。1928年の日仏対抗競技は国際スポーツ界の文脈における両国の、こうした思惑が一致したことで実現可能になったと考えられ、試合に臨む両国の姿勢が大きく異なっていたことが明らかとなった。