Updated on 2024/02/27

写真a

 
TANAKA, Masashi
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences, School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Job title
Associate Professor
Degree
PhD (Psychology) ( 2013.03 The University of Tokyo )

Research Experience

  • 2023.04
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences   Associate Professor

  • 2020.04
    -
    2023.03

    Waseda University   Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences   Lecturer

  • 2018.07
    -
    2020.03

    Tohoku University   Graduate School of Life Sciences   Assistant professor

  • 2013.07
    -
    2018.06

    Duke University School of Medicine   Neurobiology   Postdoctoral associate

  • 2013.04
    -
    2013.06

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   Project researcher

Education Background

  • 2010.04
    -
    2013.03

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   Ph.D. in Psychology  

  • 2008.04
    -
    2010.03

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   M.A.  

  • 2006.04
    -
    2008.03

    The University of Tokyo   Faculty of Letters   B.A.  

  • 2004.04
    -
    2006.03

    The University of Tokyo   College of Arts and Sciences  

Research Areas

  • Neuroscience-general / Basic brain sciences / Experimental psychology

Research Interests

  • songbird

  • birdsong

  • oscine

  • Passeri

  • oscines

  • bird

  • audition

  • reward

  • emotion

  • communication

  • electrophysiology

  • neurophysiology

  • neural circuit

▼display all

 

Papers

  • A comparative perspective on animal cultures

    Masashi Tanaka

    WASEDA RILAS JOURNAL     62 - 71  2022.10  [Refereed]

  • A mesocortical dopamine circuit enables the cultural transmission of vocal behaviour

    Masashi Tanaka, Fangmiao Sun, Yulong Li, Richard Mooney

    Nature   563 ( 7729 ) 117  2018.10  [Refereed]

    DOI

    Scopus

    68
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Identification of a motor-to-auditory pathway important for vocal learning

    Todd F. Roberts, Erin Hisey, Masashi Tanaka, Matthew G. Kearney, Gaurav Chattree, Cindy F. Yang, Nirao M. Shah, Richard Mooney

    NATURE NEUROSCIENCE   20 ( 7 ) 978 - +  2017.07  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Learning to vocalize depends on the ability to adaptively modify the temporal and spectral features of vocal elements. Neurons that convey motor-related signals to the auditory system are theorized to facilitate vocal learning, but the identity and function of such neurons remain unknown. Here we identify a previously unknown neuron type in the songbird brain that transmits vocal motor signals to the auditory cortex. Genetically ablating these neurons in juveniles disrupted their ability to imitate features of an adult tutor's song. Ablating these neurons in adults had little effect on previously learned songs but interfered with their ability to adaptively modify the duration of vocal elements and largely prevented the degradation of songs' temporal features that is normally caused by deafening. These findings identify a motor to auditory circuit essential to vocal imitation and to the adaptive modification of vocal timing.

    DOI

    Scopus

    69
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • A Distributed Recurrent Network Contributes to Temporally Precise Vocalizations

    Kosuke Hamaguchi, Masashi Tanaka, Richard Mooney

    NEURON   91 ( 3 ) 680 - 693  2016.08  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    How do forebrain and brainstem circuits interact to produce temporally precise and reproducible behaviors? Birdsong is an elaborate, temporally precise, and stereotyped vocal behavior controlled by a network of forebrain and brainstem nuclei. An influential idea is that song premotor neurons in a forebrain nucleus (HVC) form a synaptic chain that dictates song timing in a top-down manner. Here we combine physiological, dynamical, and computational methods to show that song timing is not generated solely by a mechanism localized to HVC but instead is the product of a distributed and recurrent synaptic network spanning the forebrain and brainstem, of which HVC is a component.

    DOI

    Scopus

    50
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Focal expression of mutant huntingtin in the songbird basal ganglia disrupts cortico-basal ganglia networks and vocal sequences

    Masashi Tanaka, Jonnathan Singh Alvarado, Malavika Murugan, Richard Mooney

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   113 ( 12 ) E1720 - E1727  2016.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The basal ganglia (BG) promote complex sequential movements by helping to select elementary motor gestures appropriate to a given behavioral context. Indeed, Huntington's disease (HD), which causes striatal atrophy in the BG, is characterized by hyperkinesia and chorea. How striatal cell loss alters activity in the BG and downstream motor cortical regions to cause these disorganized movements remains unknown. Here, we show that expressing the genetic mutation that causes HD in a song-related region of the songbird BG destabilizes syllable sequences and increases overall vocal activity, but leave the structure of individual syllables intact. These behavioral changes are paralleled by the selective loss of striatal neurons and reduction of inhibitory synapses on pallidal neurons that serve as the BG output. Chronic recordings in singing birds revealed disrupted temporal patterns of activity in pallidal neurons and downstream cortical neurons. Moreover, reversible inactivation of the cortical neurons rescued the disorganized vocal sequences in transfected birds. These findings shed light on a key role of temporal patterns of cortico-BG activity in the regulation of complex motor sequences and show how a genetic mutation alters cortico-BG networks to cause disorganized movements.

    DOI

    Scopus

    23
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Giant ankyrin-G stabilizes somatodendritic GABAergic synapses through opposing endocytosis of GABA(A) receptors

    Wei Chou Tseng, Paul M. Jenkins, Masashi Tanaka, Richard Mooney, Vann Bennett

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   112 ( 4 ) 1214 - 1219  2015.01  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    GABA(A)-receptor-based interneuron circuitry is essential for higher order function of the human nervous system and is implicated in schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and autism. Here we demonstrate that giant ankyrin-G (480-kDa ankyrin-G) promotes stability of somatodendritic GABAergic synapses in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, giant ankyrin-G forms developmentally regulated and cell-type-specific micron-scale domains within extrasynaptic somatodendritic plasma membranes of pyramidal neurons. We further find that giant ankyrin-G promotes GABAergic synapse stability through opposing endocytosis of GABA(A) receptors, and requires a newly described interaction with GABARAP, a GABA(A) receptor-associated protein. We thus present a new mechanism for stabilization of GABAergic interneuron synapses and micron-scale organization of extrasynaptic membrane that provides a rationale for studies linking ankyrin-G genetic variation with psychiatric disease and abnormal neurodevelopment.

    DOI

    Scopus

    60
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Independent control of reciprocal and lateral inhibition at the axon terminal of retinal bipolar cells.

    Masashi Tanaka, Masao Tachibana

    The Journal of physiology   591 ( 16 ) 3833 - 51  2013.08  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Bipolar cells (BCs), the second order neurons in the vertebrate retina, receive two types of GABAergic feedback inhibition at their axon terminal: reciprocal and lateral inhibition. It has been suggested that two types of inhibition may be mediated by different pathways. However, how each inhibition is controlled by excitatory BC output remains to be clarified. Here, we applied single/dual whole cell recording techniques to the axon terminal of electrically coupled BCs in slice preparation of the goldfish retina, and found that each inhibition was regulated independently. Activation voltage of each inhibition was different: strong output from a single BC activated reciprocal inhibition, but could not activate lateral inhibition. Outputs from multiple BCs were essential for activation of lateral inhibition. Pharmacological examinations revealed that composition of transmitter receptors and localization of Na(+) channels were different between two inhibitory pathways, suggesting that different amacrine cells may mediate each inhibition. Depending on visual inputs, each inhibition could be driven independently. Model simulation showed that reciprocal and lateral inhibition cooperatively reduced BC outputs as well as background noise, thereby preserving high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we conclude that excitatory BC output is efficiently regulated by the dual operating mechanisms of feedback inhibition without deteriorating the quality of visual signals.

    DOI PubMed

    Scopus

    10
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Active Roles of Electrically Coupled Bipolar Cell Network in the Adult Retina

    Itaru Arai, Masashi Tanaka, Masao Tachibana

    JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE   30 ( 27 ) 9260 - 9270  2010.07  [Refereed]

    DOI

    Scopus

    29
    Citation
    (Scopus)

▼display all

Books and Other Publications

  • Acoustic Communication in Animals

    Masashi Tanaka( Part: Contributor, Vocal imitation, a specialized brain function that facilitates cultural transmission in songbirds)

    Springer  2023.06 ISBN: 9789819908301

    DOI

  • BRAIN SCIENCE REVIEW 2021

    田中雅史( Part: Contributor, 模倣を制御する神経メカニズム)

    公益財団法人ブレインサイエンス振興財団  2021.04 ISBN: 9784904419991

  • 生き物と音の事典

    生物音響学会( Part: Contributor, 歌の認知と生成の神経機構)

    朝倉書店  2019.11 ISBN: 9784254171679

  • Clinical Neuroscience Vol.37

    田中雅史( Part: Contributor, トリの歌の模倣におけるドーパミンの役割)

    中外医学社  2019.07

Research Projects

  • 歌の世代間伝達における文化進化の種間比較

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業

    Project Year :

    2021.04
    -
    2024.03
     

    田中 雅史

     View Summary

    本研究は、人類の文明発展にも寄与したと考えられる文化伝達のプロセスを理解するため、ヒトと、ヒトのように自発的に音声の模倣学習を行う能力をもつキンカチョウという鳥を対象として、長期的に新奇な歌を伝達させる実験を行っている。初年度は、キンカチョウを対象に、パフォーマーとなる成鳥のオスのキンカチョウが歌っている映像を録画して、自由なキー押しによってリズムを変調した鳥の歌とともに視聴させることで文化伝達を引き起こした。学習された歌を分析したところ、一部の発声の模倣は見られたものの、全体的な歌の伝達効率が、対面で行われるキンカチョウの文化伝達に比べて、概して低いことが明らかになった。一方、幼少期にヒトの給餌で育てられたキンカチョウは、キンカチョウの自然な歌からかけ離れた電子音であっても、そのリズムやピッチ、音色に一定の模倣学習が可能であることが明らかになったため、次年度からは、学習方式として、キー押しによる自発的な文化伝達に加え、トリよりも統制が容易なヒトとの社会的相互作用を加えた条件を追加し、また、伝達させる刺激としては、キンカチョウの歌を改変した音声に加え、より分析が容易な電子音を追加することで、キンカチョウの文化伝達を多角的に分析する予定である。ヒトの文化伝達の実験については、いまだ予備伝達実験を行いながら文化伝達の音声・映像刺激の作成を進めているところであるが、次年度には、新奇な文化として伝達させるための刺激を用意して、第3世代までの文化伝達の完了を目指す予定である。

  • 発話のリズムや順序を制御する神経機構

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2021.03
     

    田中 雅史

     View Summary

    本研究は、歌をさえずるスズメ亜目の鳥(songbird, 歌鳥)の一種キンカチョウが、ヒトと類似の言語的発話を通してコミュニケーションを行う社会的な動物であることに着目し、その発声の時間制御をささえる神経メカニズムの解明を目指している。本研究では、短時間フーリエ解析を利用した新しいアルゴリズムでキンカチョウの発声に含まれるリズムを解析したところ、成熟したキンカチョウの歌には10 Hz程度のリズムが認められた。この10 Hzのリズムは、大脳皮質運動野(HVC)で生じる神経活動のリズムとも一致しており、さらに、幼少期の経験を操作することによって、このリズムの安定化を操作できることも明らかになった。幼少期のHVCの神経活動には、成熟した鳥の歌を聞いた前後で、発声と関連した活動が増大するという興味深い現象も観察できており、発声のリズム成熟にHVCが関与している可能性が強く示唆された。また、社会的隔離を経験した鳥の歌では、発声の順序を人工的に入れ替えてシャッフルするとテンポの安定性が崩れるという、通常の鳥の歌では認められる時間的性質が認められなかった。このテンポの発声順序依存性は、リズムをもった音声なら必ず見られる特性というわけではなく、たとえばマウスが求愛時に発する超音波域の発声や、ヒトの言語的な音声も一定のテンポを持つが、その発声の順序を入れ替えてもテンポの安定性は変化しなかった。しかし、興味深いことに、ヒトの音楽的な歌(独唱)は、キンカチョウの歌のように、順序を入れ替えることでテンポの安定性が崩れることがわかった。シミュレーションの結果から、キンカチョウの歌やヒトの歌に見られる発声順序依存性は、オシレーターのようなメカニズムでそのリズムが維持されているという可能性が示唆されている。現在、これらの成果をまとめ、国際専門誌への投稿準備を進めているところである。

  • 思春期の社会的経験を通してコミュニケーション能力が成熟する神経機構

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2021.03
     

    田中 雅史

     View Summary

    本研究では、長く言語学習や音声コミュニケーションを調べる動物モデルとして用いられてきたキンカチョウというスズメ亜目の鳥(songbird, 歌鳥)を用いることで、思春期の社会的経験がその後のコミュニケーションや神経回路に与える影響を効率良く明らかにすることを目指した。本研究の結果、思春期の開始頃(20~60日齢)に親から隔離され、社会的に孤立して育てられたキンカチョウは、正常に育てられたキンカチョウと比較し、成長後の他の鳥との音声コミュニケーションが顕著に減少し、その歌の音程やリズムも不安定であることが分かった。我々が新規に開発した短時間フーリエ解析を利用した発声リズムの解析プログラムで分析したところ、社会的隔離を経験した鳥では、正常な鳥に比べ、歌のテンポが不安定であり、さらに、歌における個々の発声の順序を人工的に入れ替えてシャッフルするとテンポの安定性が崩れるという、通常の鳥の歌では認められる時間的性質が認められなかった。このテンポの発声順序依存性は、リズムをもった音声なら必ず見られる特性というわけではないようで、たとえばマウスが求愛時に発する超音波域の発声や、ヒトの言語的な音声も一定のテンポを持つが、その発声の順序を入れ替えてもテンポの安定性は変化しないこともわかってきた。しかし、興味深いことに、ヒトの音楽的な歌(独唱)は、キンカチョウの歌のように、順序を入れ替えることでテンポの安定性が崩れることがわかった。シミュレーションの結果から、キンカチョウの歌やヒトの歌に見られる発声順序依存性は、オシレーターのようなメカニズムでそのリズムが維持されているという可能性が示唆されている。現在、これらの成果をまとめ、国際専門誌への投稿準備を進めているところである。

  • Neural mechanisms for selecting the imitation model

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2021.03
     

    Tanaka Masashi

     View Summary

    This study focused on a songbird species, the zebra finch, to elucidate the neural mechanisms for selecting the imitation model. By using our new algorithms that can analyze imitation efficacy and imitated song features, we found that the tempo stability of the song is one of the cultural traits that the songbirds can transmit across generations. Computational simulations suggest that the song tempo is maintained by an oscillatory mechanism, which could also generate the stable tempo of musical songs sung by humans. Neural recordings in HVC suggest that the oscillatory mechanism may emerge in HVC after song learning. Song learning can evoke neural activity in the midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) to induce synaptic plasticity in HVC neurons. We have identified several nuclei that project to PAG, including the amygdala. We are currently exploring the roles of these neural circuits in imitative learning.

 

Syllabus

▼display all

 

Internal Special Research Projects

  • 抽象的音響への好みの種間比較

    2022  

     View Summary

    本研究は、世代を超えた文化伝達において新文化への好みが形成される要因を、ヒトのみならず、キンカチョウという、ヒトのように自発的に音声の文化伝達を行う能力をもつ鳥を対象に解明することを目的としている。本年度は、無調音列を元に作成した人の歌を人から人へと伝達されていく実験を行い、教師となる人の顔が見える社会的条件で、歌のピッチやリズムがより正確に伝達されることが示唆された。また、社会的条件で新奇な音響を聞いて育ったキンカチョウは、これら音響を模倣することが明らかになったが、必ずしも顕著な嗜好が形成されないことも示唆された。今後さらに嗜好形成にかかわる要因を詳細に調べ、文化伝達との関連を解明したい。

  • 抽象的音響への好みを支えるプロセスの探究

    2021  

     View Summary

    本研究では、キンカチョウという、ヒトと同様自発的に音声の文化的伝達を行う鳥を利用して、動物が音楽のような抽象的音響に対する好みを形成する過程を研究している。本年度は、キンカチョウの歌のリズムを変調した刺激や人工的な電子音を作成して、感覚学習期と呼ばれる歌学習の臨界期段階のキンカチョウへと呈示することで、文化伝達で伝わりやすい音響的特性の一端を明らかにし、また、異種のヒトとの社会的相互作用であっても社会的信号が模倣学習を促進する可能性が示唆された。今後も、さらに多様な音響的特性を操作し、種々の抽象的音響への身体反応や神経活動を記録することで、好みが形成されるメカニズムを探求する予定である。

  • 音楽の知覚・認知・生成を支える生物メカニズム

    2020  

     View Summary

    本研究では、音楽のような抽象的な音響が動物の情動を動かし、身体運動の促進やストレス軽減など多様な生理機能をもつ神経メカニズムを探求している。本研究では、キンカチョウとヒトを対象として、サイン音で構成された抽象的音響に対する両者の嗜好の共通点を明らかにできた一方で、キンカチョウが好むさえずりの音楽的解析を行うことによって、ヒトの歌と同様のリズム特性を有することも明らかになりつつある。今後、さらに音楽に対するヒトとキンカチョウの生理反応を調べることで、音楽の機能を調べる初の動物モデルとしてキンカチョウを確立できる可能性が期待できる。