Updated on 2022/05/18

写真a

 
TANAKA, Masashi
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences, School of Humanities and Social Sciences
Job title
Assistant Professor

Education

  • 2010.04
    -
    2013.03

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   Ph.D. in Psychology  

  • 2008.04
    -
    2010.03

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   M.A.  

  • 2006.04
    -
    2008.03

    The University of Tokyo   Faculty of Letters   B.A.  

  • 2004.04
    -
    2006.03

    The University of Tokyo   College of Arts and Sciences  

Degree

  • 2013.03   The University of Tokyo   PhD (Psychology)

Research Experience

  • 2020.04
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences   Lecturer

  • 2018.07
    -
    2020.03

    Tohoku University   Graduate School of Life Sciences   Assistant professor

  • 2013.07
    -
    2018.06

    Duke University School of Medicine   Neurobiology   Postdoctoral associate

  • 2013.04
    -
    2013.06

    The University of Tokyo   Graduate School of Humanities and Sociology   Project researcher

 

Research Areas

  • Neuroscience-general

  • Basic brain sciences

  • Experimental psychology

Research Interests

  • songbird

  • birdsong

  • oscine

  • Passeri

  • oscines

  • bird

  • audition

  • reward

  • emotion

  • communication

  • electrophysiology

  • neurophysiology

  • neural circuit

▼display all

Papers

  • A mesocortical dopamine circuit enables the cultural transmission of vocal behaviour

    Masashi Tanaka, Fangmiao Sun, Yulong Li, Richard Mooney

    Nature   563 ( 7729 ) 117  2018.10  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Identification of a motor-to-auditory pathway important for vocal learning

    Todd F. Roberts, Erin Hisey, Masashi Tanaka, Matthew G. Kearney, Gaurav Chattree, Cindy F. Yang, Nirao M. Shah, Richard Mooney

    NATURE NEUROSCIENCE   20 ( 7 ) 978 - +  2017.07  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Learning to vocalize depends on the ability to adaptively modify the temporal and spectral features of vocal elements. Neurons that convey motor-related signals to the auditory system are theorized to facilitate vocal learning, but the identity and function of such neurons remain unknown. Here we identify a previously unknown neuron type in the songbird brain that transmits vocal motor signals to the auditory cortex. Genetically ablating these neurons in juveniles disrupted their ability to imitate features of an adult tutor's song. Ablating these neurons in adults had little effect on previously learned songs but interfered with their ability to adaptively modify the duration of vocal elements and largely prevented the degradation of songs' temporal features that is normally caused by deafening. These findings identify a motor to auditory circuit essential to vocal imitation and to the adaptive modification of vocal timing.

    DOI

  • A Distributed Recurrent Network Contributes to Temporally Precise Vocalizations

    Kosuke Hamaguchi, Masashi Tanaka, Richard Mooney

    NEURON   91 ( 3 ) 680 - 693  2016.08  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    How do forebrain and brainstem circuits interact to produce temporally precise and reproducible behaviors? Birdsong is an elaborate, temporally precise, and stereotyped vocal behavior controlled by a network of forebrain and brainstem nuclei. An influential idea is that song premotor neurons in a forebrain nucleus (HVC) form a synaptic chain that dictates song timing in a top-down manner. Here we combine physiological, dynamical, and computational methods to show that song timing is not generated solely by a mechanism localized to HVC but instead is the product of a distributed and recurrent synaptic network spanning the forebrain and brainstem, of which HVC is a component.

    DOI

  • Focal expression of mutant huntingtin in the songbird basal ganglia disrupts cortico-basal ganglia networks and vocal sequences

    Masashi Tanaka, Jonnathan Singh Alvarado, Malavika Murugan, Richard Mooney

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   113 ( 12 ) E1720 - E1727  2016.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The basal ganglia (BG) promote complex sequential movements by helping to select elementary motor gestures appropriate to a given behavioral context. Indeed, Huntington's disease (HD), which causes striatal atrophy in the BG, is characterized by hyperkinesia and chorea. How striatal cell loss alters activity in the BG and downstream motor cortical regions to cause these disorganized movements remains unknown. Here, we show that expressing the genetic mutation that causes HD in a song-related region of the songbird BG destabilizes syllable sequences and increases overall vocal activity, but leave the structure of individual syllables intact. These behavioral changes are paralleled by the selective loss of striatal neurons and reduction of inhibitory synapses on pallidal neurons that serve as the BG output. Chronic recordings in singing birds revealed disrupted temporal patterns of activity in pallidal neurons and downstream cortical neurons. Moreover, reversible inactivation of the cortical neurons rescued the disorganized vocal sequences in transfected birds. These findings shed light on a key role of temporal patterns of cortico-BG activity in the regulation of complex motor sequences and show how a genetic mutation alters cortico-BG networks to cause disorganized movements.

    DOI

  • Giant ankyrin-G stabilizes somatodendritic GABAergic synapses through opposing endocytosis of GABA(A) receptors

    Wei Chou Tseng, Paul M. Jenkins, Masashi Tanaka, Richard Mooney, Vann Bennett

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA   112 ( 4 ) 1214 - 1219  2015.01  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    GABA(A)-receptor-based interneuron circuitry is essential for higher order function of the human nervous system and is implicated in schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and autism. Here we demonstrate that giant ankyrin-G (480-kDa ankyrin-G) promotes stability of somatodendritic GABAergic synapses in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, giant ankyrin-G forms developmentally regulated and cell-type-specific micron-scale domains within extrasynaptic somatodendritic plasma membranes of pyramidal neurons. We further find that giant ankyrin-G promotes GABAergic synapse stability through opposing endocytosis of GABA(A) receptors, and requires a newly described interaction with GABARAP, a GABA(A) receptor-associated protein. We thus present a new mechanism for stabilization of GABAergic interneuron synapses and micron-scale organization of extrasynaptic membrane that provides a rationale for studies linking ankyrin-G genetic variation with psychiatric disease and abnormal neurodevelopment.

    DOI

  • Independent control of reciprocal and lateral inhibition at the axon terminal of retinal bipolar cells.

    Masashi Tanaka, Masao Tachibana

    The Journal of physiology   591 ( 16 ) 3833 - 51  2013.08  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Bipolar cells (BCs), the second order neurons in the vertebrate retina, receive two types of GABAergic feedback inhibition at their axon terminal: reciprocal and lateral inhibition. It has been suggested that two types of inhibition may be mediated by different pathways. However, how each inhibition is controlled by excitatory BC output remains to be clarified. Here, we applied single/dual whole cell recording techniques to the axon terminal of electrically coupled BCs in slice preparation of the goldfish retina, and found that each inhibition was regulated independently. Activation voltage of each inhibition was different: strong output from a single BC activated reciprocal inhibition, but could not activate lateral inhibition. Outputs from multiple BCs were essential for activation of lateral inhibition. Pharmacological examinations revealed that composition of transmitter receptors and localization of Na(+) channels were different between two inhibitory pathways, suggesting that different amacrine cells may mediate each inhibition. Depending on visual inputs, each inhibition could be driven independently. Model simulation showed that reciprocal and lateral inhibition cooperatively reduced BC outputs as well as background noise, thereby preserving high signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, we conclude that excitatory BC output is efficiently regulated by the dual operating mechanisms of feedback inhibition without deteriorating the quality of visual signals.

    DOI PubMed

  • Active Roles of Electrically Coupled Bipolar Cell Network in the Adult Retina

    Itaru Arai, Masashi Tanaka, Masao Tachibana

    JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE   30 ( 27 ) 9260 - 9270  2010.07  [Refereed]

    DOI

▼display all

Specific Research

  • 抽象的音響への好みを支えるプロセスの探究

    2021  

     View Summary

    本研究では、キンカチョウという、ヒトと同様自発的に音声の文化的伝達を行う鳥を利用して、動物が音楽のような抽象的音響に対する好みを形成する過程を研究している。本年度は、キンカチョウの歌のリズムを変調した刺激や人工的な電子音を作成して、感覚学習期と呼ばれる歌学習の臨界期段階のキンカチョウへと呈示することで、文化伝達で伝わりやすい音響的特性の一端を明らかにし、また、異種のヒトとの社会的相互作用であっても社会的信号が模倣学習を促進する可能性が示唆された。今後も、さらに多様な音響的特性を操作し、種々の抽象的音響への身体反応や神経活動を記録することで、好みが形成されるメカニズムを探求する予定である。

  • 音楽の知覚・認知・生成を支える生物メカニズム

    2020  

     View Summary

    本研究では、音楽のような抽象的な音響が動物の情動を動かし、身体運動の促進やストレス軽減など多様な生理機能をもつ神経メカニズムを探求している。本研究では、キンカチョウとヒトを対象として、サイン音で構成された抽象的音響に対する両者の嗜好の共通点を明らかにできた一方で、キンカチョウが好むさえずりの音楽的解析を行うことによって、ヒトの歌と同様のリズム特性を有することも明らかになりつつある。今後、さらに音楽に対するヒトとキンカチョウの生理反応を調べることで、音楽の機能を調べる初の動物モデルとしてキンカチョウを確立できる可能性が期待できる。

 

Syllabus

▼display all