Updated on 2024/04/24

写真a

 
FAHEY, Robert Andrew
 
Affiliation
Affiliated organization, Waseda Institute for Advanced Study
Job title
Assistant Professor(non-tenure-track)
Mail Address
メールアドレス

Research Experience

  • 2022.04
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Institute for Advanced Study   Assistant Professor

  • 2019.04
    -
    2022.03

    Waseda University   Institute for Research in Contemporary Political and Economic Affairs   Research Associate

Education Background

  • 2015.09
    -
    2021.10

    Waseda University   Graduate School of Political Science   PhD Political Science  

  • 2013.09
    -
    2015.09

    Waseda University   Graduate School of Political Science   MA Political Science  

  • 2008.10
    -
    2012.08

    School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London   Faculty of Languages and Cultures   BA Japanese  

Professional Memberships

  • 2022
    -
    Now

    Japanese Political Science Association

  • 2018
    -
    Now

    Japanese Association for Public Opinion Research

  • 2018
    -
    Now

    European Consortium for Political Research

  • 2018
    -
    Now

    American Political Science Association

Research Areas

  • Politics
 

Papers

  • Support for Conspiracy Beliefs among Japanese Citizens as seen through Public Opinion Surveys

    Robert A. Fahey

    Chuo Koron   137 ( 12 ) 62 - 69  2023.11  [Invited]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Social Media in the 2021 Election Campaign

    Robert A. Fahey

    Japan Decides 2021: The Japanese General Election    2022.10  [Refereed]  [Invited]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • How populist attitudes scales fail to capture support for populists in power

    Sebastian Jungkunz, Robert A. Fahey, Airo Hino

    PLOS ONE   16 ( 12 ) e0261658 - e0261658  2021.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Populist attitudes are generally measured in surveys through three necessary and non-compensatory elements of populism, namely anti-elitism, people-centrism, and Manicheanism. Using Comparative Study of Electoral Systems Module 5 (2016–2020) data for 30 countries, we evaluate whether this approach explains voting for populist parties across countries in Asia, Europe and the Americas. We show that the existing scales of populist attitudes effectively explain voting for populists in countries where populist leaders and parties are in opposition but fail to explain voting for populist parties in countries where they are in power. We argue that current approaches assume “the elite” to mean “politicians”, thus failing to capture attitudes towards “non-political elites” often targeted by populists in office—in particular, journalists, academics/experts, bureaucrats, and corporate business leaders. The results reveal limits to the usefulness of existing survey batteries in cross-national studies of populism and emphasize the need to develop approaches that are more generalizable across political and national contexts.

    DOI

    Scopus

    27
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Populism in Japan

    Robert Fahey

    The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Politics     317 - 350  2021.03  [Refereed]  [Invited]  [International journal]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    Abstract

    While populism has become a major force in many nations in recent decades, the extent to which the phenomenon is found in Japan’s politics is a contested topic on which scholars have asserted positions ranging from claims that it simply does not exist in Japan, to opposing claims that Japan’s most powerful and influential recent prime ministers have in fact been populists, with various positions in between those extremes also being represented. Some of this contestation arises from different definitions of “populism” that were developed in parallel in Japanese and Western literature, both of which also further differ from the vernacular usage of the term in Japanese political and media discourses. Consequently, scholars following different definitions have drawn quite different conclusions regarding the populist nature of Japanese political actors. This chapter outlines the correspondences and contrasts between the different definitions and uses them to examine claims that prominent contemporary political figures, including former prime ministers Junichiro Koizumi and Shinzō Abe, as well as regional governors Toru Hashimoto, Yuriko Koike, and Takashi Kawamura, have been populists or have utilized populist rhetoric in their campaigns. We find that while overt populism in Japan—at least according to the definitions used internationally—is generally confined to regional politics, national leaders have also displayed proclivity to borrow limited aspects of populist rhetoric and strategy in support of their political campaigns and policy objectives.

    DOI

  • COVID-19, digital privacy, and the social limits on data-focused public health responses

    Robert Fahey

    International Journal of Information Management     102181 - 102181  2020.07  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

    DOI

    Scopus

    116
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Covariance in diurnal patterns of suicide-related expressions on Twitter and recorded suicide deaths.

    Robert A Fahey, Jeremy Boo, Michiko Ueda

    Social science & medicine (1982)   253   112960 - 112960  2020.05  [Refereed]  [International journal]

    Authorship:Lead author, Corresponding author

     View Summary

    Social media data is increasingly used to gain insights into trends in mental health, but prior studies aimed at confirming a link between online expression of suicidal ideation on social media and actual suicide deaths have been inconclusive. Using comprehensive six-year data sets of Twitter posts and suicide deaths in Japan, we examine the diurnal relationship between the proportional incidence of a suicide-related keyword, "kietai" ("I want to disappear"), and suicide deaths with an OLS regression model. We also use co-occurrence analysis to reveal changes in the linguistic context of the suicide-related keyword at different hours of the day. We find a clear diurnal pattern in the use of this suicide-related keyword, peaking between 1am and 5am. This diurnal trend is positively correlated with suicide deaths among younger cohorts (ages 15 to 44), but the correlation is negative among older adults (45 and over). The correlation among young adults strengthens when a delay between tweet incidence and suicide deaths is included. Compared to daytime tweets, nighttime tweets exhibited a stronger relationship between words related to self-disgust and words directly indicating suicidal intent. This study confirms the hypothesised link between online suicidal ideation and suicide death. Despite frequent flippant use of the keyword, the consistent correlation and the diurnal changes in the context of the keyword's usage demonstrate the value of social media data to the study of mental health trends in groups at risk of suicide.

    DOI PubMed

    Scopus

    14
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Representing the Twittersphere: Archiving a representative sample of Twitter data under resource constraints

    Airo Hino, Robert A. Fahey

    International Journal of Information Management   48   175 - 184  2019.10  [Refereed]

    DOI

    Scopus

    28
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Tracking the Werther Effect on social media: Emotional responses to prominent suicide deaths on twitter and subsequent increases in suicide

    Robert A. Fahey, Tetsuya Matsubayashi, Michiko Ueda

    Social Science & Medicine   219   19 - 29  2018  [Refereed]

    DOI

    Scopus

    47
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Japan: Political Developments and Data in 2022

    AIRO HINO, HIROKI OGAWA, ROBERT A. FAHEY, LING LIU

    European Journal of Political Research Political Data Yearbook    2023.06  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Japan: Political Developments and Data in 2021

    AIRO HINO, HIROKI OGAWA, ROBERT A. FAHEY, LING LIU

    European Journal of Political Research Political Data Yearbook   61 ( 1 ) 264 - 286  2022.12  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • From Filter Bubble to Social Divide: Social Polarisation in Europe and Japan

    Robert A. Fahey, Stefano Camatarri

    Value Politics in Japan and Europe     79 - 102  2021.12  [Invited]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Populism and Conspiracy Belief in Japan

    Robert A. Fahey

    Yoron: Journal of the Japanese Association for Public Opinion Research   127   11 - 21  2021.03  [Domestic journal]

    Authorship:Lead author, Corresponding author

    DOI

  • Sentiment Analysis and Social Media

    Robert Fahey

    The SAGE Handbook of Research Methods in Political Science and International Relations     534 - 551  2020.04  [Refereed]  [Invited]

    DOI

  • Can we estimate "voters' true intentions" from social media data?

    Robert Fahey

       2019.03  [Invited]  [Domestic journal]

    Authorship:Lead author

    DOI

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Presentations

  • Structure and Identity in an Online Conspiracy Theory Community: Real-Time Conspiracy Narrative Formation in Japan following the Assassination of Abe Shinzō

    Robert A. Fahey

    Midwest Political Science Association (MPSA) Annual Conference 

    Presentation date: 2023.04

  • Political polarisation and the tendency to spread "Fake News" on Japanese social networks.

    Robert A. Fahey

    Japanese Political Science Association General Meeting 2022 

    Presentation date: 2022.10

    Event date:
    2022.10
     
     
  • Populism and Conspiracy Belief in Japan

    Robert A. Fahey

    Japanese Association for Public Opinion Research Annual Conference 

    Presentation date: 2020.11

  • From Filter Bubble to Social Cleavage: Online Polarisation Across Nations

    Robert A. Fahey, Stefano Camatarri

    2020 APSA Annual Meeting 

    Presentation date: 2020.09

    Event date:
    2020.09
     
     
  • Belief in Conspiracy Theories and Socio-Political Identity in Japan

    Airo Hino, Robert A. Fahey, Stefano Camatarri

    2020 APSA Annual Meeting 

    Presentation date: 2020.09

    Event date:
    2020.09
     
     
  • Estimating the True Beliefs of Voters from Social Media Data: A Case Study of the 2017 Japanese Election

    Robert A. Fahey

    Japanese Association for Public Opinion Research Annual Conference 

    Presentation date: 2018.11

  • Exploring Support for Japan’s New Opposition Parties with Twitter Data

    Robert A. Fahey

    APSA Annual Meeting 

    Presentation date: 2018.09

  • Populist Sentiment in Japan’s 2017 General Election: Evidence from Social Media

    Robert A. Faey

    ECPR General Meeting 

    Presentation date: 2018.08

  • Agenda-Setting Dynamics Revisited in Social Media: Evidence of “Public Agenda-Setting” from Japan

    Airo Hino, Luigi Curini, Robert A. Fahey

    International Political Science Association World Congress 

    Presentation date: 2023.07

  • Conspiracy theory communities on social media in Japan

    Robert A. Fahey  [Invited]

    UTokyo Center for Contemporary Japanese Studies Early Career Scholar Forum 

    Presentation date: 2022.12

    Event date:
    2022.12
     
     
  • Tracing the spread of conspiracy theories and fake news over social media platforms in Japan

    Robert A. Fahey  [Invited]

    Socioeconomic Networks and Network Science Workshop 

    Presentation date: 2022.08

  • Populism and Political Trust in Europe and Japan

    Robert A. Fahey, Airo Hino, Sebastian Jungkunz  [Invited]

    3rd EU-Japan Conference: Democracy at the Crossroads: Populism and its Consequences on Political Trust 

    Presentation date: 2019.12

  • Populist Attitudes and Party Preferences in Japan

    Robert A. Fahey, Airo Hino, Sebastian Jungkunz

    Northeast Workshop on Japanese Politics 

    Presentation date: 2019.08

  • Measuring Societal Polarisation in Multiple Dimensions using Social Media Data

    Robert A. Fahey  [Invited]

    Values in European and Japanese Politics Conference 

    Presentation date: 2019.03

  • Online Discussion of Suicide and its Real-World Effects

    Robert A. Fahey, Michiko Ueda

    Society as Data Symposium 

    Presentation date: 2019.01

▼display all

Research Projects

  • The Use of Conspiracy Beliefs in Political Rhetoric and its Influence on Citizens' Attitudes

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Early-Career Scientists

    Project Year :

    2024.04
    -
    2026.03
     

  • A Cross-National Study of Conspiracy Theory Beliefs and their Influence on Political Behaviour

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Early-Career Scientists

    Project Year :

    2021.04
    -
    2024.03
     

  • A New Approach to Measuring Political and Social Polarisation in Developed Nations

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Research Activity start-up

    Project Year :

    2019.08
    -
    2021.03
     

    Fahey Robert Andrew

     View Summary

    This research proposes and tests a novel method for measuring and analysing social polarization using network data from social media. Focusing on four target countries - Ireland, Belgium, Italy, and Japan - the research examines the non-political social networks of politically-engaged citizens, and calculates the degree of non-political polarization among them. Axes of polarization are identified in each country, and the types of account (media, entertainment, etc.) contributing most to that polarization are reported. Finally, a cross-national comparison reveals that while polarization exists in each country, the levels found in Ireland and Japan are very low compared to the extent of polarization in Belgium and Italy, both countries in which a social cleavage is well-documented.

  • The Paradox of Mainstreamed Populists: Enriching the Elite Concept and Renewed Measurements of Populism

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)

    Project Year :

    2022.04
    -
    2026.03
     

  • The Japanese Database of Populism Studies: New Insights and Contributions

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Fund for the Promotion of Joint International Research (Fostering Joint International Research (B))

    Project Year :

    2020.10
    -
    2025.03
     

  • Media and Suicide

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B)

    Project Year :

    2020.04
    -
    2024.03
     

  • 自然言語処理を用いた自殺リスクの高い個人の推定とその成果のSNS相談事業への応用

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業 挑戦的研究(萌芽)

    Project Year :

    2021.07
    -
    2023.03
     

    上田 路子, FAHEY ROBERT・ANDREW

     View Summary

    研究初年度である21年度はNPO法人が提供する悩みを抱える人向けのSNS相談データの整理に当て、本格的な分析に入る前の準備を主に行った。本研究課題では相談内容(発言)から相談者の精神状態及び相談対応の緊急度を測ることにしており、そのための手法の開発を行った。
    <BR>
    当該SNS相談では、相談開始前に相談者の孤独感、希死念慮、及び自殺念慮を聞いており、それらを相談内容と併せて解析することで、相談者の状態別に発言や主訴の傾向などを明らかにすることができる。今年度は相談者の孤独感、希死念慮、そして自殺念慮の傾向を属性別に把握することに努め、可視化するためのデータダッシュボードを作成した。
    <BR>
    来年度以降は21年度に行った上記準備を元に、研究成果をまとめ、論文として公表する予定である。

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Syllabus

Teaching Experience

  • Introduction to Political Analysis

    Aoyama Gakuin University  

    2024.10
    -
    Now
     

  • Nationalism and Japanese Politics

    Aoyama Gakuin University  

    2024.10
    -
    Now
     

  • Political Text Analysis

    Waseda University  

    2023.04
    -
    Now
     

  • Quantitative Political Analysis

    Waseda University  

    2022.09
    -
    Now
     

  • Big Data Analytics: Social Network Analysis

    University of Milan, Department of Social and Political Sciences  

    2021.03
    -
    2023.11
     

  • Data Access and Regulation III: Data Management

    University of Milan, Department of Social and Political Sciences  

    2020.02
    -
    2023.11
     

▼display all

 

Sub-affiliation

  • Faculty of Political Science and Economics   School of Political Science and Economics

Internal Special Research Projects

  • A Cross-National Study of Conspiracy Theory Beliefs and their Influence on Political Behaviour

    2022  

     View Summary

    This research project explores the ways in which conspiracy theories are formulated and disseminated, and how belief in such conspiracy theories influences citizens’ behaviour. The research employs both survey analysis and social media data analysis, and is designed to enhance our understanding of conspiracy theory beliefs in countries outside the Western, English-speaking contexts in which they have traditionally been researched.&nbsp;The major focus of the research project in this period concerned the online communities which created and spread conspiracy theories about the assassination of former Prime Minister Abe Shinzō in July 2022. Over 250,000 tweets matching conspiracy-related topics were gathered in the two weeks directly following the assassination, and subsequently analysed using a combination of human coding (directly reading and classifying the posts) and computer-assisted network analysis. The results of this analysis were presented at several conferences, and should be published in a scientific journal in 2023.&nbsp;In addition, two surveys were conducted in the Philippines during this period – before the presidential election in May 2022, and one year later in March 2023 – which included several test questions about conspiracy theory beliefs. The data from these surveys will help to guide the next stages of this research project.