Updated on 2022/05/17

写真a

 
HOSOKAWA, Yuri
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Sport Sciences, School of Sport and Sciences
Job title
Associate Professor

Concurrent Post

  • Affiliated organization   Global Education Center

Education

  •  
    -
    2016.12

    University of Connecticut   Department of Kinesiology   Exercise Science  

  •  
    -
    2013.06

    University of Arkansas   Department of Kinesiology   Athletic Training  

  •  
    -
    2011.03

    Waseda University   School of Sport Sciences   Sport medicine  

  •  
    -
    2007.03

    International Christian University High School  

Degree

  • 博士

Research Experience

  • 2021.04
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Faculty of Sport Sciences   Associate Professor

  • 2019.04
    -
    2021.03

    Waseda University   Faculty of Sport Sciences   Assistant Professor

  • 2018.04
    -
    2019.03

    Ritsumeikan University College of Sport and Health Science, Department of Sport and Health Science   Lecturer

  • 2017.01
    -
    2018.01

    Vice President of Communication, Korey Stringer Institute

  • 2017.01
    -
    2018.01

    Vice President of Education, Korey Stringer Institute

  • 2017.01
    -
    2018.01

    Postdoctoral fellow, Korey Stringer Institute

  • 2014.08
    -
    2016.05

    Athletic Trainer, Club Sports, University of Connecticut

  • 2013.08
    -
    2014.05

    Athletic Trainer, Rectory School

▼display all

Professional Memberships

  • 2019
    -
    Now

    子ども安全学会

  • 2019
    -
    Now

    スポーツパフォーマンス稲門会

  • 2019
    -
    Now

    International Commission on Occupational Health

  • 2018
    -
    Now

    Japanese Society of Biometeorology

  • 2017
    -
    Now

    International Society of Biometeorology

  • 2015
    -
    Now

    Japanese Society for Athletic Training

  • 2011
    -
    Now

    Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine

  • 2011
    -
    Now

    American College of Sports Medicine

  • 2011
    -
    Now

    National Athletic Trainers' Association

  • 2011
    -
    Now

    Japan Athletic Trainers’ Organization

  • 2015
    -
    2020

    American Physiological Society

▼display all

 

Research Areas

  • Medical management and medical sociology

  • Physiology

  • Sports sciences

Research Interests

  • Athletic Training, Exercise Science, Exertional Heatstroke, Heat Illness, Biometeorology, Thermoregulation, Fluid Regulation, Hydration, Sports Safety, Preventing Sudden Death, Race Medicine

Papers

  • Prehospital Management of Exertional Heat Stroke at Sports Competitions for Paralympic Athletes

    Hosokawa Y, Adami PE, Stephenson B, Blauwet C, Bermon S, Webborn N, Racinais S, Derman W, Goosey-Tolfrey V

    British Journal of Sports Medicine    2021.10  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Prehospital Management of Exertional Heat Stroke at Sports Competitions: International Olympic Committee Adverse Weather Impact Expert Working Group for the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020

    Hosokawa Y, Racinais S, Akama T, Zideman D, Budgett R, Casa DJ, Bermon S, Grundstein AJ, Pitsiladis Y, Schobersberger W, Yamasawa F

    British Journal of Sports Medicine   55   1405 - 1410  2021  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Athlete Medical Services at the Marathon and Race Walking Events During Tokyo 2020 Olympics

    Makoto Sugawara, Yoshiaki Manabe, Fumihiro Yamasawa, Yuri Hosokawa

    Frontiers in Sports and Active Living   4  2022.04  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Last author

     View Summary

    Epidemiological data from race walk and marathon events suggest that a high incidence rate of exertional heat illness is associated with high ambient temperature and relative humidity. The 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo was no exception, which led the organizing committee to relocate the race walk and marathon competitions to Sapporo, which was predicted to experience much milder heat. Nonetheless, during the Games, Sapporo recorded the highest daytime ambient temperature in the past 97 years, with consecutive days over 30°C from July 22nd to August 7th, 2021. Five events (men's and women's 20 km race walk, men's 50 km race walk, women's and men's marathon) were held in Sapporo from August 5th to August 8th, 2021. The percentage of athletes who did not finish (DNF) in each event was 8.8% in men's 20 km race walk, 20.3% in men's 50 km race walk, 8.6% in women's 20 km race walk, 17.1% in women's marathon and 28.3% in men's marathon. A total of fifty athletes were transferred to the athlete medical station: 28 athletes completed the race (i.e., collapsed after finish line), while 24 were DNF athletes transported from the course. Forty-eight (96%) of athletes who were admitted to the athlete medical station exhibited signs and symptoms of exertional heat illness. Two athletes diagnosed with exertional heat stroke and three athletes diagnosed with severe heat exhaustion (rectal body temperature >39.5°C with or without central nervous system disturbance) were cooled using whole-body cold water immersion at the heat deck located within the athlete medical station. All athletes who were cooled successfully recovered without any complications. These athletes required an average of 14 ± 9.4 min (range, 6–30 min) to cool their rectal temperature below 39°C. These results show the importance for event organizers to prepare strategies to keep athletes cool, such as an ample amount of ice and water to supply whole-body cold water immersion.

    DOI

  • Sudden Death in High School Athletes A Case Series Examining the Influence of Sickle Cell Trait

    Katherine Shoush Cools, Melissa D. Crowder, Kristen L. Kucera, Leah C. Thomas, Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J. Casa, Adil Gasim, Sang Lee, Tina M. Schade Willis

    Pediatric Emergency Care   38 ( 2 ) e497 - e500  2022.02  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Investigation of factors affecting the rate of changes in endurance exercise performance by pre-cooling with ice slurry

    Risa Iwata, Takuji Kawamura, Yuri Hosokawa, Lili Chang, Katsuhiko Suzuki, Isao Muraoka

    Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine     In Press  2022  [Refereed]

  • Prehospital Management of Exertional Heat Stroke in Field of Play Athlete Medical Service : Keeping the Olympic and Paralympic Legacy Alive

    Yuri Hosokawa

    Journal of Japanese Society for Athletic Training   7 ( 2 ) In Press  2022

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Recommended Methods for Sports Injury and Illness Surveillance: Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine and Japanese Society for Athletic Training Consensus Document

    Sunagawa, N, Manabe, T, Hangai, M, Hosokawa, Y, Okuwaki, T, Hirose, N, Nakayama, H, Taketomi, S, Kasahara, M, Mashimo, S, Masujima, A

    Japanese Journal of Clinical Sports Medicine   30 ( 2 ) 317 - 331  2022

    Authorship:Corresponding author

  • Content Analysis of Public Resources on Sports Related Concussion for Collegiate Athletes in Japan

    Hosokawa Y, Otomo M, Kumazaki A, Tashima C, Inomata T, Katsumata R, Shoji R, Makibuchi T, Nakayama H

    Japanese Journal of Athletic Training   7 ( 2 ) In Press  2022  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Systematic Review of Methodology of Studies Reporting Epidemiological Data of Sports-Related Injury and Illness in Japan

    Miwako Suzuki-Yamanaka, Akane Yoshimura, Yuri Hosokawa, Norihiko Sunagawa, Norikazu Hirose, Koji Kaneoka, Takashi Kawahara

    Japanese Journal of Clinical Sports Medicine     In Press  2022  [Refereed]

  • Epidemiology of sports-related fatalities during organized school sports in Japanese high schools between 2009 and 2018

    Miwako Suzuki Yamanaka, Yuri Hosokawa, Mamoru Ayusawa, Norikazu Hirose, Koji Kaneoka

    PLOS ONE   16 ( 8 ) e0256383 - e0256383  2021.08  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Limited literature has investigated epidemiology of sports-related fatalities during high school organizes sports in Japan. Therefore, the purposes of this study are to determine the frequency and incidence rate of sports-related fatalities in Japanese high schools by cause and sports, and to examine the type of on-site first responder. Insurance claim data of sports-related fatalities in Japanese high schools reported to Japan Sports Council Injury and Accident Mutual Aid Benefit System between 2009 and 2018 were retrieved as the primary data source. All fatalities were classified into direct or indirect type by the reported etiology and further categorized into cardiac-related, head and neck injury, exertional heat stroke (EHS), or other. Frequency and incidence rate were calculated by cause of death and sports, and incidence rates were expressed per 100,000 athlete-years (AY) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Information regarding first responder to the incident was also retrieved and examined by frequency. A total of 63 sports-related fatalities were analyzed. The overall incidence rate was 0.45 (95%CI = 0.25–0.65) per 100,000AY. The incidence rates of direct and indirect fatalities declined from 0.36 and 0.50 per 100,000AY to 0.28 and 0.00 per 100,000AY, respectively. The leading cause of deaths was cardiac-related (n = 30/63, 47.6%), followed by head and neck injury (n = 15/63, 23.8%) and EHS (n = 14/63, 22.2%). The number of fatalities was highest in male baseball (n = 12/63, 19.0%) and the incidence rate was highest in male judo (4.79 per 100,000 AY, 95%CI: 0.68–8.15). Coach was the most frequently reported first responder onsite (n = 52/63, 82.5%). Medically trained personnel were involved in onsite care in two cases (3.2%). In conclusion, the occurrence of sports-related fatalities has declined over time from 2009 to 2018. To deliver appropriate medical care onsite for better survival, employment of medically trained personnel should be promoted in high school sports setting in Japan.

    DOI

  • Bracing for heat and humidity amidst new challenges in Tokyo

    Jennifer K. Vanos, Wendy Marie Thomas, Andy Grundstein, Yuri Hosokawa, Doug Casa

    Temperature   8 ( 3 ) 206 - 208  2021.08  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Reply to the Editor

    Luke N. Belval, Gabrielle E. W. Giersch, William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, John F. Jardine, Rachel K. Katch, Rebecca L. Stearns, Douglas J. Casa

    Journal of Athletic Training   56 ( 8 ) 803 - 804  2021.08

    DOI

  • Heat Safety in the Workplace: Modified Delphi Consensus to Establish Strategies and Resources to Protect U.S Workers

    Margaret C. Morrissey, Douglas J. Casa, Gabrielle J. Brewer, William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Courteney L. Benjamin, Andrew J. Grundstein, David Hostler, Brendon P. McDermott, Meredith L. McQuerry, Rebecca L. Stearns, Erica M. Filep, David W. DeGroot, Juley Fulcher, Andreas D. Flouris, Robert A. Huggins, Brenda L. Jacklitsch, John F. Jardine, Rebecca M. Lopez, Ronda B. McCarthy, Yannis Pitisladis, Riana R. Pryor, Zachary J. Schlader, Caroline J. Smith, Denise L. Smith, June T. Spector, Jennifer K. Vanos, W. Jon Williams, Nicole T. Vargas, Susan W. Yeargin

    GeoHealth   5 ( 8 ) e2021GH000443  2021.07  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Potential use of new cooling technologies during Tokyo 2020 Olympics and associated ethical dilemmas

    Borja Muniz-Pardos, Konstantinos Angeloudis, Fergus M Guppy, Kumpei Tanisawa, Yuri Hosokawa, Garrett Ash, Wolfgang Schobersberger, Andrew Grundstein, Victor Bargoria, Gerald O Lwande, James H Ombaka, Emin Ergen, Fumihiro Yamasawa, Sebastien Racinais, Douglas J Casa, Yannis P Pitsiladis

    British Journal of Sports Medicine   55   1315 - 1316  2021.05  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Is "Athletic Trainer" the same as "Trainer" in Japan? Analysis of demographics and practice patterns

    Izumi H, Sasaki S, Hosokawa Y

    Japanese Journal of Athletic Training   7 ( 1 ) 127 - 134  2021  [Refereed]

  • Preparing and Publishing Evidence-based Position Statements

    Hosokawa Y

    Japanese Journal of Athletic Training   7 ( 1 ) 17 - 21  2021  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Has Judo as an Extracurricular Activity Become Safer? Implications of Insurance Claims for Head and Neck Injuries

    Murata Yuki, Otomo Mana, Uchida Ryo, Hosokawa Yuri, Torri Suguru

      29 ( 3 ) 430 - 437  2021  [Refereed]

  • Wearable and telemedicine innovations for Olympic events and elite sport

    Muniz-Pardos B, Angeloudis K, Guppy FM, Keramitsoglou I, Sutehall S, Bosch A, Tanisawa K, Hosokawa Y, Ash GI, Schobersberger W, Grundstein AJ, Casa DJ, Morrissey MC, Yamasawa F, Zelenkova I, Racinais S, Pitsiladis Y

    Journal Sport Medicine and Physical Fitness   61 ( 8 ) 1061 - 1072  2021  [Refereed]

  • Exertional heat risk and management strategies in American football

    Yuri Hosokawa

    The Journal of Japanese Society of Science and Football   16 ( 1 ) 34 - 40  2021  [Invited]

  • Comparison of the effect of post-exercise cooling with ice slurry ingestion between males and females

    Iwata R, Kawamura T, Hosokawa Y, Chang L, Suzuki K, Muraoka I

    Journal of Thermal Biology   99   In Press - 102979  2021  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Ethical dilemmas and validity issues related to the use of new cooling technologies and early recognition of exertional heat illness in sport

    Muniz-Pardos B, Angeloudis K, Guppy FM, Tanisawa K, Hosokawa Y, Ash GI, Shobersberger W, Grundstein AJ, Yamasawa F, Racinais S, Casa DJ, Pitsiladis Y

    BMJ Open Sport & Exercise Medicine   7 ( 2 )  2021  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games is expected to be among the hottest Games in modern history, increasing the chances for exertional heat stroke (EHS) incidence, especially in non-Acclimatised athletes/workers/spectators. The urgent need to recognise EHS symptoms to protect all attendees' health has considerably accelerated research examining the most effective cooling strategies and the development of wearable cooling technology and real-Time temperature monitoring. While these technological advances will aid the early identification of EHS cases, there are several potential ethical considerations for governing bodies and sports organisers. For example, the impact of recently developed cooling wearables on health and performance is unknown. Concerning improving athletic performance in a hot environment, there is uncertainty about this technology's availability to all athletes. Furthermore, the real potential to obtain real-Time core temperature data will oblige medical teams to make crucial decisions around their athletes continuing their competitions or withdraw. Therefore, the aim of this review is (1) to summarise the practical applications of the most novel cooling strategies/technologies for both safety (of athletes, spectators and workers) and performance purposes, and (2) to inform of the opportunities offered by recent technological developments for the early recognition and diagnosis of EHS. These opportunities are presented alongside several ethical dilemmas that require sports governing bodies to react by regulating the validity of recent technologies and their availability to all.

    DOI

  • Epidemiology of Sudden Death in Organized School Sports in Japan

    Hosokawa Y, Stearns RL, Kucera K, Murata Y, Yamanaka M, Casa DJ

    Injury Epidemiology   8 ( 27 )  2021  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Preseason Heat Safety in Secondary School Athletics

    Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   56 ( 4 ) 349 - 351  2021  [Refereed]

  • Roundtable on Preseason Heat Safety in Secondary School Athletics: Heat Acclimatization

    Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ, Périard JD, Racinais S, Wingo JE, Yeargin SW, Scarneo-Miller SE, Kerr ZY, Belval LN, Alosa D, Csillan D, Labella C, Walker L

    Journal of Athletic Training   56 ( 4 ) 352 - 361  2021  [Refereed]

  • Round Table on Preseason Heat Safety in Secondary School Athletics: Prehospital Care of Exertional Heatstroke Patients

    Miller KC, Casa DJ, Adams W, Hosokawa Y, Cates J, Emrich C, Fitzpatrick T, Hopper M, Jardine J, Labotz M, Lopez R, O'Connor F, Smith S

    Journal of Athletic Training   56 ( 4 ) 372 - 382  2021  [Refereed]

  • Round Table on Preseason Heat Safety in Secondary School Athletics: Methods of Environmental Monitoring for Heat Safety During Activity

    Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Casa DJ, Vanos JK, Cooper ER, Grundstein AJ, Jay O, McDermott BP, Otani H, Raukar N, Stearns RL, Tripp B

    Journal of Athletic Training   56 ( 4 ) 362 - 371  2021  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    <sec>
    <title>Objective</title>
    To develop best-practice recommendations using thermal indices to determine work-to-rest ratios and facilitate further implementation of environmental monitoring for heat safety in secondary school athletics in the United States.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Data Sources</title>
    A narrative review of the current literature on environmental monitoring for heat safety during athletics was conducted by content experts. A list of action-oriented recommendations was established from the narrative review and further refined using the Delphi method.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Conclusions</title>
    Assessment of wet bulb globe temperature at the site of activity and throughout the duration of the event is recommended to assist clinicians and administrators in making appropriate decisions regarding the duration and frequency of activity and rest periods. Activity-modification guidelines should be predetermined and approved by stakeholders and should outline specific actions to be followed, such as the work-to-rest ratio, frequency and timing of hydration breaks, and adjustment of total exercise duration, equipment, and clothing. Furthermore, integration of exertional heat illness injury data with environmental condition characteristics is critical for the development of evidence-based heat safety guidelines for secondary school athletics. Athletic trainers play an essential role in conducting prospective injury data collection, recording onsite wet bulb globe temperature levels, and implementing recommendations to protect the health and safety of athletes.


    </sec>

    DOI

  • Greater thermoregulatory strain in the morning than late afternoon during judo training in the heat of summer

    Hidenori Otani, Takayuki Goto, Yuki Kobayashi, Minayuki Shirato, Heita Goto, Yuri Hosokawa, Ken Tokizawa, Mitsuharu Kaya

    PLOS ONE   15 ( 12 ) e0242916 - e0242916  2020.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    <sec id="sec001">
    <title>Purpose</title>
    The time-of-day variations in environmental heat stress have been known to affect thermoregulatory responses and the risk of exertional heat-related illness during outdoor exercise in the heat. However, such effect and risk are still needed to be examined during indoor sports/exercises. The current study investigated the diurnal relationships between thermoregulatory strain and environmental heat stress during regular judo training in a judo training facility without air conditioning on a clear day in the heat of summer.


    </sec>
    <sec id="sec002">
    <title>Methods</title>
    Eight male high school judokas completed two 2.5-h indoor judo training sessions. The sessions were commenced at 09:00 h (AM) and 16:00 h (PM) on separate days.


    </sec>
    <sec id="sec003">
    <title>Results</title>
    During the sessions, indoor and outdoor heat stress progressively increased in AM but decreased in PM, and indoor heat stress was less in AM than PM (mean ambient temperature: AM 32.7±0.4°C; PM 34.4±1.0°C, <italic>P</italic>&lt;0.01). Mean skin temperature was higher in AM than PM (<italic>P</italic>&lt;0.05), despite greater dry and evaporative heat losses in AM than PM (<italic>P</italic>&lt;0.001). Infrared tympanic temperature, heart rate and thermal sensation demonstrated a trial by time interaction (<italic>P</italic>&lt;0.001) with no differences at any time point between trials, showing relatively higher responses in these variables in PM compared to AM during the early stages of training and in AM compared to PM during the later stages of training. There were no differences between trials in body mass loss and rating of perceived exertion.


    </sec>
    <sec id="sec004">
    <title>Conclusions</title>
    This study indicates a greater thermoregulatory strain in the morning from 09:00 h than the late afternoon from 16:00 h during 2.5-h regular judo training in no air conditioning facility on a clear day in the heat of summer. This observation is associated with a progressive increase in indoor and outdoor heat stress in the morning, despite a less indoor heat stress in the morning than the afternoon.


    </sec>

    DOI

  • Age- and Sex-Based Differences in Exertional Heat Stroke Incidence in a 7-Mile Road Race

    Luke N. Belval, Gabrielle E.W. Giersch, William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, John F. Jardine, Rachel K. Katch, Rebecca L. Stearns, Douglas J. Casa

    Journal of Athletic Training   55 ( 12 ) 1224 - 1229  2020.11  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    <sec>
    <title>Context</title>
    Sex, age, and wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) have been proposed risk factors for exertional heat stroke (EHS) despite conflicting laboratory and epidemiologic evidence.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Objective</title>
    To examine differences in EHS incidence while accounting for sex, age, and environmental conditions.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Design</title>
    Observational study.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Main Outcome Measure(s)</title>
    Using data from the Falmouth Road Race, a warm-weather 7-mi (11.26-km) running road race, we reviewed records from patients treated for EHS at medical tents. The relative risk (RR) of EHS between sexes and across ages was assessed with males as the reference population. Multivariate linear regression analyses were calculated to determine the relative contribution of sex, age, and WBGT to the incidence of EHS.


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Results</title>
    Among 343 EHS cases, the female risk of EHS was lower overall (RR = 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.58, 0.89; P = .002) and for age groups 40 to 49 years (RR = 0.43; 95% CI = 0.24, 0.77; P = .005) and 50 to 59 years (RR = 0.31; 95% CI = 0.13, 0.72; P = .005). The incidence of EHS did not differ between sexes in relation to WBGT (P &amp;gt; .05). When sex, age, and WBGT were considered in combination, only age groups &amp;lt;14 years (β = 2.41, P = .008), 15 to 18 years (β = 3.83, P &amp;lt; .001), and 19 to 39 years (β = 2.24, P = .014) significantly accounted for the variance in the incidence of EHS (R2 = .10, P = .006).


    </sec>
    <sec>
    <title>Conclusions</title>
    In this unique investigation of EHS incidence in a road race, we found a 29% decreased EHS risk in females compared with males. However, when sex was considered with age and WBGT, only younger age accounted for an increased incidence of EHS. These results suggest that road race medical organizers should consider participant demographics when organizing the personnel and resources needed to treat patients with EHS. Specifically, organizers of events with greater numbers of young runners (aged 19 to 39 years) and males should prioritize ensuring that medical personnel are adequately prepared to handle patients with EHS.


    </sec>

    DOI

  • Incidence of Recurrent Exertional Heat Stroke in a Warm-Weather Road Race

    Stearns RL, Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Belval LN, Huggins RA, Jardine JF, Katch RK, Davis RJ, Casa DJ

    Medicina   56 ( 12 ) 720  2020  [Refereed]

  • The epidemiology and management of exertional heat illness events in high school sports, 2012/13-2016/17 academic years

    Kerr ZY, Yeargin S, Hirschorn R, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ

    Journal of Sports Rehabilitation   29 ( 3 ) 332 - 338  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Environmental Conditions, Preseason Fitness Levels, and Game Workload: Analysis of a Female NCAA DI National Championship Soccer Season

    Benjamin C, Hosokawa Y, Curtis RM, Schaefer DA, Bergin RT, Abegg MR, Casa DJ

    Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research   34 ( 4 ) 988 - 994  2020  [Refereed]

  • Translating evidence-based practice to clinical practice in Tokyo 2020: How to diagnose and manage exertional heat stroke

    Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ, Racinais S

    British Journal of Sports Medicine   54   883 - 884  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Solar radiation and the validity of infrared tympanic temperature during exercise in the heat

    Otani H, Kaya M, Tamaki A, Hosokawa Y, Lee JKW

    International Journal of Biometeorology   64   39 - 45  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Exertional Heat Stroke of Max Gilpin; A Preventable Death

    Adams WM, Belval LN, Hosokawa Y, Stearns RL, Casa DJ

    Quest   72 ( 1 ) 102 - 115  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • A multi-scalar climatological analysis in preparation for extreme heat at the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games

    Vanos JK, Thomas WM, Grundstein AJ, Hosokawa Y, Liu Y, Casa DJ

    Temperature   7 ( 2 ) 191 - 214  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Extreme heat & health at Tokyo2020ne: The need for scientific coalition across sectors

    Hosokawa Y, Vanos JK

    Temperature   7 ( 2 ) 111 - 113  2020  [Refereed]  [Invited]

    DOI

  • Exertional Heat Illness Prevention lead by Athletic Trainer in Japanese High School: A Case Study

    Koide A, Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Japanese Society for Athletic Training   6 ( 1 ) 67 - 73  2020  [Refereed]

  • Sports-related catastrophic injuries on school campus

    Otomo M, Hosokawa Y, Murata Y, Tsukuda F, Sunagawa N

    Journal of Japanese Society for Athletic Training   5 ( 2 ) 93 - 99  2020  [Invited]

     View Summary

    <p>This study aimed to investigate Catastrophic injuries as defined by Japan Sport Council (JSC) (grades I-XIV) documented on school campus and explore benefits of introducing athletic trainers on campus. All injury data submitted to JSC Injury and Accident Mutual Aid Benefit System between 2009 -2018 that occurred in junior high or high school (n=2,094) were included in the analysis. Injury data were categorized by activity (curricular course, curricular activity, school event, extracurricular activity, recess, other) and location (classroom, laboratory, indoor athletic facility, hallway, staircase, balcony, rooftop, restroom, outdoor athletic field, pool, other). </p><p>Athletic injuries were documented in 98%, 86%, and 71% of all injuries that occurred during extracurricular activity, curricular course, and school event. In addition, 93%, 90%, and 96% of all injuries that occurred at outdoor athletic field, indoor athletic facility, and pool, respectively, were related to athletic activity.</p><p>JSC data suggest that majority of injuries that occur on junior high and high school campus were related to athletic activities. Therefore, school administrators may benefit from having athletic trainers who can provide first aid and injury prevention services to help elevate the standard of care on school campus.</p>

    DOI CiNii

  • Special Considerations for Resumption to Athletic Activities: Basic Principles

    Hosokawa Y, Akuzawa H, Akiyama K

    Coaching clinic   34 ( 7 ) 45 - 47  2020

    CiNii

  • 熱中症の病態に基づく評価と対応

    Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Clinical Sports Medicine   37 ( 6 ) 646 - 650  2020  [Invited]

  • Characteristics of full-time athletic trainers in Japan

    Izumi H, Sasaki S, Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Japanese Society for Athletic Training   6 ( 1 ) 95 - 104  2020  [Refereed]

  • Heat Policy Revision for Georgia High School Football Practices based on Data-Driven Research

    Cooper E, Grundstein AJ, Miles J, Ferrara M, Curry P, Casa DJ, Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Athletic Training     673 - 681  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Exertional Heat Illness Preparedness Strategies: Environmental Monitoring Policies in United States High Schools

    Scarneo-Miller SE, Belval LN, Yeargin SW, Hosokawa Y, Kerr, ZY, Casa DJ

    Medicina   56 ( 10 ) 486  2020  [Refereed]

  • Differences between sexes in thermoregulatory responses and exercise time during endurance exercise in a hot environment following pre-cooling with ice slurry ingestion

    Risa Iwata, Takuji Kawamura, Yuri Hosokawa, Lili Chang, Katsuhiko Suzuki, Isao Muraoka

    Journal of Thermal Biology   94   102746 - 102746  2020  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Chemically-activated Cooling Vest’s Effect on Cooling Rate Following Exercise-induced Hyperthermia: A Randomized Counter-Balanced Crossover Study

    Yuri Hosokawa, Luke N. Belval, William M. Adams, Lesley W. Vandermark, Douglas J. Casa

    Medicina   56 ( 10 ) 539  2020  [Refereed]

  • 労作性熱中症の応急処置としての冷却方法

    Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Clinical Sports Medicine   37 ( 11 ) 1272 - 1277  2020  [Invited]

  • Influence of Race Performance and Environmental Conditions on Exertional Heat Stroke Prevalence among Runners Participating in a Warm Weather Road

    Grundstein AJ, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ, Stearns RL, Jardine JF

    Frontiers in Sports and Active Living   1:41   1 - 5  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Practical Hydration Solutions for Sports and the Physically Active

    Belval LN, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ, Adams WM, Armstrong LE, Baker L, Burke, Cheuvront S, Chiampas G, Gonzalez-Alonso J, Huggins RA, Kavouras S, Lee EC, McDermott B, Miller K, Schlader Z, Sims S, Stearns RL, Tryoanos C, Wingo J

    Nutrients   11 ( 7 ) 1550  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Internal body temperature measurement and performance

    Sekiguchi Y, Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   472   41 - 43  2019  [Invited]

  • Athlete monitoring using subjective indices

    Sekiguchi Y, Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   473   41 - 43  2019  [Invited]

  • Use of athlete monitoring to optimize safety and performance

    Sekiguchi Y, Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   474   41 - 43  2019  [Invited]

  • Monitoring Internal Body Temperature

    Sekiguchi Y, Belval LN, Stearns RL, Casa DJ, Hosokawa Y

    Sports Science Exchange   29   1 - 5  2019  [Invited]

  • Exertional Heat Stroke

    Taniguchi J, Hosokawa Y

    LiSA   26 ( 7 ) 680 - 682  2019  [Invited]

  • Athletic Training Services in Japan: A Comparison of the United States and Japan Based on Educational Background

    Izumi H, Hosokawa Y

    Athletic Training Education Journal   14 ( 4 ) 305 - 314  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Wireless Measurement of Rectal Temperatures During Exercise: Comparing an Ingestible Thermometric Telemetric Pill Used as a Suppository Against a Conventional Rectal Probe

    Gosselin J, Béliveau J, Hamel M, Casa DJ, Hosokawa Y, Morais J, Goulet EDB

    Journal of Thermal Biology   83   112 - 118  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Solar radiation exposure has diurnal effects on thermoregulatory response during soccer training in the heat outdoors

    Otani H, Goto T, Goto H, Hosokawa Y, Shirato M

    Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research   33 ( 10 ) 2608 - 2615  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Inconsistency in the standard of care for exertional heat stroke– toward evidence-based management of exertional heat stroke

    Hosokawa Y, Nagata T, Hasegawa M

    Frontiers of Physiology   18  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Is heat tolerance state or trait?

    Hosokawa Y, Stearns RL, Casa DJ

    Sports Medicine   49 ( 3 ) 365 - 370  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Activity modification in heat: critical assessment of guidelines across athletic, occupational, and military settings in the USA

    Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ, Trtanj J, Belval LN, Deuster PA, Giltz S, Grundstein AJ, Hawkins M, Huggins Ra, Jacklitsch B, Jardine JF, Jones H, Kazman JB, Reynolds ME, Thomas RJ, Tustin AW, Schnapp K, Stearns RL, Vanos JK, Williams A, Williams WJ

    International Journal of Biometeorology   63   405 - 427  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Epidemiology of Sudden Death in Organized Youth Sports in the United States, 2007-2015

    Endres B, Stearns RL, Adams WM, Kerr ZY, Kucera KL, Hosokawa Y, Huggins RA, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   54 ( 4 )  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • The Globalization of Athletic Training and Athletic Therapy Education: Special Guest Editor Welcome

    Hosokawa Y

    Athletic Training Education Journal   14 ( 4 ) 240 - 240  2019  [Refereed]

  • Compliance with the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Inter-Association Task Force preaseason heat acclimatization guidelines in the 2017 high school football preseason

    Kerr ZY, Register-Mihalik JK, Pryor RR, Hosokawa Y, Scarneo SE, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   54 ( 7 ) 749 - 757  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Knowledge and Belief Toward Heat Safety and Hydration Strategies Among Runners: A Preliminary Evaluation

    Hosokawa Y, Johnson E, Stearns RL, Jardine JF, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   54 ( 5 ) 541 - 549  2019  [Refereed]

  • The influence of compression socks during a marathon on exercise-associated muscle damage

    Zaleski AL, Pescatello LS, Panza GA, Ballard KD, Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Thompson PD

    Journal of Sport Rehabilitation   28 ( 7 ) 724 - 728  2019  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Factors involved in the onsite management and care of exertional heat stroke in secondary school athletics

    Adams WM, Belval LN, Hosokawa Y

    Athletic Training & Sports Health Care   11 ( 5 ) 206 - 209  2019  [Refereed]

  • The Socio-Ecological Framework: A Multi-Faceted Approach to Sport-Related Death in High School Sports

    Scarneo SE, Kerr ZY, Kroshus E, Register-Mihalki JK, Hosokawa Y, Stearhs RL, DiStefano LJ, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   54 ( 4 ) 356 - 360  2019  [Refereed]

  • A review of concussion education for youth sport stakeholders

    Murata Y, Hosokawa Y, Otomo M, Uchida R

    Japanese Journal of Clinical Sports Medicine   27 ( 1 ) 118 - 144  2019  [Refereed]

  • The WBGT Index: A Primer for Road Race Medicine

    Cheuvront SN, Hosokawa Y

    Endurance and Sports Medicine   2 ( 3 ) 22 - 26  2018  [Invited]

  • Emergency Preparedness for extreme weather

    Hosokawa Y

    Coaching Clinic     82 - 85  2018.01  [Invited]

  • Knowledge and belief toward heat safety and hydration strategies among runners participating in summer race

    Hosokawa Y, Johnson E, Stearns RL, Jardine JF, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training    2018

  • Fatal Exertional Heat Stroke and American Football Players: The Need for Regional Heat-Safety Guidelines

    Grundstein AJ, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   53 ( 1 ) 43 - 50  2018  [Refereed]

  • Consensus Statement- Pre-Hospital Emergency Care of Exertional Heat Stroke

    Belval LN, Casa DJ, Adams WM, Chiampas GC, Davis R, Holschen J, Hosokawa Y, Huggins RA, Jardine JF, Labotz M, McClaine K, Nye NS, O’Connor FG, Prine BR, Shawn K, Smith SM, Stearns RL, Vandermark LW

    Prehospital Emergency Care   22 ( 3 ) 392 - 397  2018  [Refereed]

  • Extreme Heat Considerations in International Football Venues: The Utility of Employing Climatological Data in Decision Making

    Hosokawa Y, Grundstein AJ, Casa DJ

    Journal of Athletic Training   53 ( 9 ) 860 - 865  2018  [Refereed]

  • Pearls of Practice: Organization and Execution of On-site Health Care during a Mass Participation Event

    Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Troyanos C

    Athletic Training & Sports Health Care   10 ( 3 ) 101 - 104  2018  [Refereed]

  • Exertional heat illness incidence and on-site medical team preparedness in warm weather

    Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Belval LN, Davis RJ, Huggins RA, Jardine JF, Katch RK, Stearns RL, Casa DJ

    International Journal of Biometeorology   62   1147 - 1153  2018  [Refereed]

  • 暑熱環境にけるパフォーマンスの最適化

    Hosokawa Y, Tokizawa K

    Journal of the Japan Research Association for Textile End-Uses   59 ( 11 ) 862 - 866  2018  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Environmental Conditions and Seasonal Variables in American Youth Football Leagues

    Susan W. Yeargin, Erin Cahoon, Yuri Hosokawa, James M. Mensch, Thomas P. Dompier, Zachary Y. Kerr

    CLINICAL PEDIATRICS   56 ( 13 ) 1209 - 1218  2017.11

     View Summary

    Our study describes youth football (YFB) environmental conditions and the associated heat index (HI) risk category. An observational research design was utilized. Independent variables included month, time, event, and geographic location. Main outcome variables were frequency of events, average HI, and corresponding risk categorization. The HI was recorded with the day and time for each YFB event across 2 YFB seasons. Nearly half (49.8%) of events were in a high HI risk category and 20.0% should have been cancelled. The hottest HI values were recorded in July and August (83.2 +/- 9.4 degrees F to 87.2 +/- 10.9 degrees F; 24.0% of YFB events). The 7 to 10 am time frame was cooler (67.7 +/- 14.5 degrees F; 6.3% of YFB events) than other time frames (P &lt; .001). Hotter HI values were recorded in practices versus games (75.9 +/- 14.1 degrees F vs 70.6 +/- 14.6 degrees F; t = -6.426, P &lt; .001). Starting the YFB season in September and holding weekend events in the early morning hours can decrease exposure to environmental heat stress.

    DOI

  • Round Table on Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically Active Populations: Meeting Proceedings

    Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J. Casa, Henry Rosenberg, John F. Capacchione, Emmanuel Sagui, Sheila Riazi, Luke N. Belval, Patricia A. Deuster, John F. Jardine, Stavros A. Kavouras, Elaine C. Lee, Kevin C. Miller, Sheila M. Muldoon, Francis G. O'Connor, Scott R. Sailor, Nyamkhishig Sambuughin, Rebecca L. Stearns, William M. Adams, Robert A. Huggins, Lesley W. Vandermark

    JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING   52 ( 4 ) 377 - 383  2017.04

     View Summary

    Context: Recent case reports on malignant hyperthermia (MH)-like syndrome in physically active populations indicate potential associations among MH, exertional heat stroke (EHS), and exertional rhabdomyolysis (ER). However, an expert consensus for clinicians working with these populations is lacking.
    Objective: To provide current expert consensus on the (1) definition of MH; (2) history, etiology, and pathophysiology of MH; (3) epidemiology of MH; (4) association of MH with EHS and ER; (5) identification of an MH-like syndrome; (6) recommendations for acute management of an MH-like syndrome; (7) special considerations for physically active populations; and (8) future directions for research.
    Setting: An interassociation task force was formed by experts in athletic training, exercise science, anesthesiology, and emergency medicine. The ''Round Table on Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically Active Populations'' was convened at the University of Connecticut, Storrs, September 17-18, 2015.
    Conclusions: Clinicians should consider an MH-like syndrome when a diagnosis of EHS or ER cannot be fully explained by clinical signs and symptoms presented by a patient or when recurrent episodes of EHS or ER (or both) are unexplained. Further research is required to elucidate the genetic and pathophysiological links among MH, EHS, and ER.

    DOI

  • Tarp-Assisted Cooling as a Method of Whole-Body Cooling in Hyperthermic Individuals

    Yuri Hosokawa, William M. Adams, Luke N. Belval, Lesley W. Vandermark, Douglas J. Casa

    ANNALS OF EMERGENCY MEDICINE   69 ( 3 ) 347 - 352  2017.03

     View Summary

    Study objective: We investigated the efficacy of tarp-assisted cooling as a body cooling modality.
    Methods: Participants exercised on a motorized treadmill in hot conditions (ambient temperature 39.5 degrees C [103.1 F], SD 3.1 degrees C [5.58 F]; relative humidity 38.1% [SD 6.7%]) until they reached exercise-induced hyperthermia. After exercise, participants were cooled with either partial immersion using a tarp-assisted cooling method (water temperature 9.20 degrees C [48.56 F], SD 2.81 degrees C [5.06 F]) or passive cooling in a climatic chamber.
    Results: There were no differences in exercise duration (mean difference=0.10 minutes; 95% CI-5.98 to 6.17 minutes or end exercise rectal temperature (mean difference=0.10 degrees C [0.18 degrees F]; 95% CI-0.05 C to 0.25 degrees C [-0.09 degrees F to 0.45 degrees F] between tarp-assisted cooling (48.47 minutes [SD 8.27 minutes]; rectal temperature 39.73 degrees C [103.51 degrees F], SD 0.27 degrees C [0.49 degrees F]) and passive cooling (48.37 minutes [SD 7.10 minutes]; 39.63 degrees C [103.33 degrees F], SD 0.40 C [0.72 degrees F]). Cooling time to rectal temperature 38.25 degrees C (100.85 degrees F) was significantly faster in tarp-assisted cooling (10.30 minutes [SD 1.33 minutes]) than passive cooling (42.78 [SD 5.87 minutes]). Cooling rates for tarp-assisted cooling and passive cooling were 0.17 degrees C/min (0.31 degrees F/min), SD 0.07 degrees C/min (0.13 degrees F/min) and 0.04 degrees C/min (0.07 degrees F/min), SD 0.01 C/min (0.02 degrees F/ min), respectively (mean difference=0.13 degrees C [0.23 F]; 95% CI 0.09 C to 0.17 degrees C [0.16 degrees F to 0.31 degrees F]. No sex differences were observed in tarp-assisted cooling rates (men 0.17 degrees C/min [0.31 F/min], SD 0.07 degrees C/min [0.13 F/min]; women 0.16 degrees C/min [0.29 degrees F/min], SD 0.07 degrees C/min [0.13 degrees F/min]; mean difference=0.02 degrees C/min [0.04 degrees F/min]; 95% CI-0.06 C/min to 0.10 degrees C/min [-0.11 degrees F/min to 0.18 degrees F/min]). Women (0.04 degrees C/min [0.07 degrees F/min], SD 0.01 degrees C/min [0.02 degrees F/min]) had greater cooling rates than men (0.03 degrees C/min [0.05 F/min], SD 0.01 degrees C/min [0.02 degrees F/min]) in passive cooling, with negligible clinical effect (mean difference=0.01 degrees C/min [0.02 F/min]; 95% CI 0.001 degrees C/min to 0.024 degrees C/ min [0.002 degrees F/min to 0.04 degrees F/min]). Body mass was moderately negatively correlated with the cooling rate in passive cooling (r=-0.580) but not in tarp-assisted cooling (r=-0.206).
    Conclusion: In the absence of a stationary cooling method such as cold-water immersion, tarp-assisted cooling can serve as an alternative, field-expedient method to provide on-site cooling with a satisfactory cooling rate.

    DOI

  • Deviation from goal pace, body temperature and body mass loss as predictors of road race performance

    William Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Luke Belval, Robert Huggins, Rebecca Stearns, Douglas Casa

    JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT   20 ( 3 ) 302 - 306  2017.03

     View Summary

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between pacing, gastrointestinal temperature (T-GI), and percent body mass loss (%BML) on relative race performance during a warm weather 11.3 km road race.
    Design: Observational study of a sample of active runners competing in the 2014 Falmouth Road Race.
    Methods: Participants ingested a T-GI pill and donned a GPS enabled watch with heart rate monitoring capabilities prior to the start of the race. Percent off predicted pace (%OFF) was calculated for seven segments of the race. Separate linear regression analyses were used to assess the relationship between pace, T-GI, and %BML on relative race performance. One-way ANOVA was used to analyse post race T-GI (&gt;= 40 degrees C vs &lt;40 degrees C) on pace and %OFF.
    Results: Larger %BML was associated with faster finish times (R-2 = 0.19, p = 0.018), faster average pace (R-2 = 0.29, p = 0.012), and a greater %OFF (R-2 = 0.15, p = 0.033). %OFF during the first mile (1.61 km) significantly predicted overall finish time (R-2 = 0.64, p &lt; 0.001) while %OFF during the second mile (3.22 km) (R-2 change = 0.18, p &lt; 0.001) further added to the model (R-2 = 0.82, p &lt; 0.001). Body temperature (pre race T-GI and post race T-GI) was not predictive of overall finish time (p &gt; 0.05). There was a trend in a slower pace (p = 0.055) and greater %OFF (p = 0.056) in runners finishing the race with a T-GI &gt; 40 degrees C.
    Conclusions: Overall, finish time was influenced by greater variations in pace during the first two miles of the race. In addition, runners who minimized fluid losses and had lower T-GI were associated with meeting self-predicted goals. (C) 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI

  • Heat Illness Prevention and Management in Athletics

    Hosokawa Y

    The Backboard   6   65 - 69  2017  [Invited]

  • Exercise performance and safety in the heat

    Hosokawa Y

    Journal of Japanese Society for Athletic Training   3 ( 1 ) 33 - 38  2017  [Invited]

  • The Inter-Association Task Force for Youth Sports Emergency Health & Safety: Best Practices Recommendations

    Huggins RA, Scarneo SE, Casa DJ, Alic S, Belval LN, Carr K, Chaffin E, Chiampas G, Clayton M, Colvin A, Curtis RM, Duffy AJ, Flury A, Gammons M, Griffin B, Hosokawa Y, Jardine JF, Jorgenson A, Labella CR, Margarucci K, Miller J, Moskovitz-Thompson L, Ransone J, Scott K, Oats R, Sailor S, Stearns RL, Vandermark LW, Weston T

    Journal of Athletic Training   52 ( 4 ) 383 - 400  2017  [Refereed]

  • Preventing Death from Exertional Heat Stroke—The Long Road from Evidence to Policy

    Casa DJ, Hosokawa Y, Belval LN, Adams WM, Stearns RL

    Kinesiology Review   6 ( 1 ) 99 - 109  2017  [Refereed]

  • Reduction in body temperature using hand cooling versus passive rest after exercise in the heat

    William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Elizabeth L. Adams, Luke N. Belval, Robert A. Huggins, Douglas J. Casa

    JOURNAL OF SCIENCE AND MEDICINE IN SPORT   19 ( 11 ) 936 - 940  2016.11

     View Summary

    Objectives: To examine the effects of hydration and hand cooling on lowering body temperature after exercise in the heat.
    Design: Randomized cross-over design.
    Methods: Nine recreationally active male participants (mean +/- SD; age, 24 +/- 4; height, 177.3 +/- 9.9 cm; body mass, 76.7 +/- 11.6 kg; body fat, 14.7 +/- 5.8%) completed a bout of treadmill exercise in a hot environment. After completion of exercise, participants were assigned to the following trials for post-exercise cooling: (1) hydrated with passive rest (HY), (2) hydrated with hand cooling on both hands (HY+2HC), (3) dehydrated with passive rest (DY), and (4) dehydrated with hand cooling on both hands (DY+2HC). Within subject differences were assessed using a three-way (Hydration x Condition x Time) repeated measures ANOVA with Tukey's post hoc analysis if significant interactions were found.
    Results: Irrespective of hydration status, hand cooling on both hands resulted in significantly greater reductions in T-REC than passive cooling at minute 20 (0.27 degrees C [0.05, 0.49], ES = 2.08, p=0.017) (Fig. 1). The reduction in T-REC at minute 18 trended towards statistical significance (0.21 degrees C [.003, .42], ES = 1.59, p=0.053). Hydration status alone and when differentiated among modes of cooling showed no differences on changes of T-REC or heart rate across all conditions during post exercise recovery (p&gt;0.05).
    Conclusions: Hand cooling on both hands reduced T-REC more than passive cooling, however, the cooling rates observed render hand cooling a poor option for cooling. Greater reductions in T-REC after exercise or between bouts of exercise may enhance recovery and subsequent performance. (C) 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI

  • Body-Cooling Paradigm in Sport: Maximizing Safety and Performance During Competition

    William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J. Casa

    JOURNAL OF SPORT REHABILITATION   25 ( 4 ) 382 - 394  2016.11

     View Summary

    Context: Although body cooling has both performance and safety benefits, knowledge on optimizing cooling during specific sport competition is limited. Objectives: To identify when, during sport competition, it is optimal for body cooling and to identify optimal body-cooling modalities to enhance safety and maximize sport performance. Evidence Acquisition: A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify articles with specific context regarding body cooling, sport performance, and cooling modalities used during sport competition. A search of scientific peer-reviewed literature examining the effects of body cooling on exercise performance was done to examine the influence of body cooling on exercise performance. Subsequently, a literature search was done to identify effective cooling modalities that have been shown to improve exercise performance. Evidence Synthesis: The cooling modalities that are most effective in cooling the body during sport competition depend on the sport, timing of cooling, and feasibility based on the constraints of the sports rules and regulations. Factoring in the length of breaks (halftime substitutions, etc), the equipment worn during competition, and the cooling modalities that offer the greatest potential to cool must be considered in each individual sport. Conclusions: Scientific evidence supports using body cooling as a method of improving performance during sport competition. Developing a strategy to use cooling modalities that are scientifically evidence-based to improve performance while maximizing athlete's safety warrants further investigation.

    DOI

  • Heat Illness

    Hosokawa Y

    Coaching Clinic     64 - 65  2016.09  [Invited]

  • An Exertional Heat Stroke Survivor's Return to Running: An Integrated Approach on Treatment, Recovery, and Return to Activity

    William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Robert A. Huggins, Stephanie M. Mazerolle, Douglas J. Casa

    JOURNAL OF SPORT REHABILITATION   25 ( 3 ) 280 - 287  2016.08

     View Summary

    Context: Evidence-based best practices for the recognition and treatment of exertional heat stroke (EHS) indicate that rectal thermometry and immediate, aggressive cooling via cold-water immersion ensure survival from this medical condition. However, little is known about the recovery, medical follow-up, and return to activity after an athlete has suffered EHS. Objective: To highlight the transfer of evidenced-based research into clinical practice by chronicling the treatment, recovery, and return to activity of a runner who suffered an EHS during a warm-weather road race. Design: Case study. Setting: Warm-weather road race. Participant: 53-y-old recreationally active man. Intervention: A runner's treatment, recovery, and return to activity from EHS and 2014 Falmouth Road Race performance. Main Outcomes: Runner's perceptions and experiences with EHS, body temperature, heart rate, hydration status, exercise intensity. Results: The runner successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident of EHS. Four dominant themes emerged from the data: predisposing factors, ideal treatment, lack of medical follow-up, and patient education. The first theme identified 3 predisposing factors that contributed to the runner's EHS: hydration, sleep loss, and lack of heat acclimatization. The runner received ideal treatment using evidence-based best practices. A lack of long-term medical care following the EHS with no guidance on the runner's return to full activity was observed. The runner knew very little about EHS before the 2013 race, which drove him to seek knowledge as to why he suffered EHS. Using this newly learned information, he successfully completed the 2014 Falmouth Road Race without incident. Conclusions: This case supports prior literature examining the factors that predispose individuals to EHS. Although evidence-based best practices regarding prompt recognition and treatment of EHS ensure survival, this case highlights the lack of medical follow-up and physician-guided return to activity after EHS.

    DOI

  • Comparison of Gastrointestinal and Rectal Temperatures During Recovery After a Warm-Weather Road Race

    Yuri Hosokawa, William M. Adams, Rebecca L. Stearns, Douglas J. Casa

    JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC TRAINING   51 ( 5 ) 382 - 388  2016.05

     View Summary

    Context: It has been well established that gastrointestinal temperature (T-GI) tracks closely with rectal temperature (T-REC) during exercise. However, the field use of T-GI pills is still being examined, and little is known about how measurements obtained using these devices compare during recovery after exercise in warm weather.
    Objective: To compare T-GI and T-REC in runners who completed an 11.3-km warm-weather road race and determine if runners with higher T-GI and T-REC present with greater passive cooling rates during recovery.
    Design: Cross-sectional study.
    Setting: Field.
    Patients or Other Participants: Thirty recreationally active runners (15 men, 15 women; age = 39 +/- 11 years, weight = 68.3 +/- 11.7 kg, body fat = 19.2%+/- 5.0%).
    Main Outcome Measure(s): The T-GI and T-REC were obtained immediately after the race and during a 20-minute passive rest at the 2014 Falmouth Road Race (heat index = 26.2 degrees C +/- 0.9 degrees C). Temperatures were taken every 2 minutes during passive rest. The main dependent variables were mean bias and limits of agreement for T-GI and T-REC, using Bland-Altman analysis, and the 20-minute passive cooling rates for T-GI and T-REC.
    Results: No differences were evident between T-GI and T-REC throughout passive rest (P = .542). The passive cooling rates for T-GI and T-REC were 0.046 +/- 0.031 degrees C.min(-1) and 0.060 +/- 0.036 degrees C.min(-1), respectively. Runners with higher T-GI and T-REC at the start of cooling had higher cooling rates (R = 0.682, P &lt; .001 and R = 0.54, P = .001, respectively). The mean bias of T-GI during the 20-minute passive rest was -0.06 degrees C +/- 0.56 degrees C with 95% limits of agreement of 61.09 degrees C.
    Conclusions: After participants completed a warm-weather road race, T-GI provided a valid measure of body temperature compared with the criterion measure of T-REC. Therefore, T-GI may be a viable option for monitoring post-exercise-induced hyperthermia, if the pill is administered prophylactically.

    DOI

  • Sport Safety Awareness and Education in Japan and the U.S.

    Murata Y, Hosokawa Y, Saho Y

    JATI Express   51   38 - 40  2016  [Invited]

  • Concern Emerges About Proper Implementation of Consensus Statement Guidelines– letter to the editor

    Casa DJ, Hosokawa Y, Huggins RA, Stearns RL, Adams WM, Beltz EM, Belval LN, Curtis RM, DiStefano LJ, Eason CM, Fortunati AR, Iannicelli JP, Katch RK, Lepley AS, Lepley LK, Mazerolle SM, Pike AM, Rafeldt DA, Root HJ, Scarneo SE, Vandermark LW

    NATA News     8 - 9  2016.01

  • Comparison of esophageal, rectal, and gastrointestinal temperatures during passive cooling after intense exercise in the heat: the influence of hydration

    Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Casa DJ

    Journal of Sports Rehabilitation   26 ( 2 )  2016  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • The Timing of Exertional Heat Stroke Survival Starts prior to Collapse

    William M. Adams, Yuri Hosokawa, Douglas J. Casa

    CURRENT SPORTS MEDICINE REPORTS   14 ( 4 ) 273 - 274  2015.07

    DOI

  • Athletic performance in the heat: heat illness prevention strategies in the United States

    Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   429   14 - 16  2015  [Invited]

  • Recognition and Prevention of Sudden Death in Sport

    Murata Y, Hosokawa Y

    JATI Express   49   37 - 49  2015  [Invited]

  • Literature Review on Exercise in the Heat: Optimizing the Athletic Performance and Preventing Exertional Heat Illness in the Heat

    Murata Y, Hosokawa Y

    JATI Express   50   39 - 42  2015  [Invited]

  • Preventing Sudden Death in Sports (1)

    Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   412   48 - 49  2014  [Invited]

  • Preventing Sudden Death in Sports (2)

    Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   413   48 - 49  2014  [Invited]

  • Preventing Sudden Death in Sports (3)

    Hosokawa Y

    Training Journal   414   52 - 53  2014  [Invited]

  • Heat Stroke in Physical Activity and Sports

    Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Casa DJ, Stearns RL

    Pensar en Movimiento   12 ( 2 ) 1 - 22  2014  [Refereed]

  • El Golpe De Calor En La Actividad Física Y El Deporte (version traduceda al español)

    Hosokawa Y, Adams WM, Casa DJ, Stearns RL

    Pensar en Movimiento    2014  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Case Review Pubic Stress Fracture in a Collegiate Lacrosse Player

    Yuri Hosokawa, Gretchen D. Oliver

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ATHLETIC THERAPY & TRAINING   18 ( 2 ) 13 - 16  2013.03

  • Collegiate women's lacrosse injuries: A 2-year prospective surveillance study

    Manabu Sanomura, Yuri Hosokawa, Chiaki Nakamura, Toru Fukubayashi

    Japanese Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine   62 ( 5 ) 399 - 411  2013

     View Summary

    The purpose of this prospective study was to examine the injury characteristics in collegiate women's lacrosse players. Injury data were collected from the Division I collegiate women's lacrosse team for a 2-year. The total athlete-hours and athlete-exposures over the 2-year period were 27,621 and 13,437, respectively. The total number of injury was 309 injuries, and the total incidence rate was 11.19 injuries (95% confidence interval, 9.94 - 12.43) per 1000 athlete-hours and 23.00 injuries (20.43 - 25.56) per 1000 athlete-exposures, respectively. The most frequent location of injury was the ankle, followed by the knee and the thigh (20.1%, 14.6%, and 10.7% of all injuries). The proportion of lower extremity injuries accounted for 73.5% of all injuries. The most common types of injury was sprains and muscle cramps/ spasms (24.9% and 24.6%, respectively). Overuse, contact (e.g., other players, the cross, and the ball), and non-contact injury was the 3 most common cause of injury (39.1%, 24.9%, and 17.2%, respectively). The primary injury characteristics of collegiate women's lacrosse players were non-contact ankle sprain. Injury recurrence accounted for 26.1% of all injuries, and the most common period required for the player to return to practice and/or games was between 3 and 7 days. Midfield position player suffered the most number of injuries compared to other position player. An understanding of the injury characteristics of women's lacrosse players may facilitate the development of the comprehensive strategy for injury prevention which is recommended by the sports medicine community.

    DOI

  • Injury surveillance of collegiate women’s lacrosse: a prospective study

    Sanomura M, Hosokawa Y, Nakamura C, Fukubayashi T

    Journal of Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine   20 ( 3 ) 46 - 468  2012  [Refereed]

▼display all

Books and Other Publications

  • Body Temperature Physiology for Understanding "Why"

    Yuri Hosokawa( Part: Contributor)

    Kyorin Shoin  2021.04

  • Heat Countermeasures in Sport Activity: Safety and Performance Enhancement in the Heat

    ( Part: Contributor, Part 1 Chapter 5 Acute care of exertional heat illness and return to play considerations in sport)

    NAP  2021

  • みんなでつくる学校のスポーツ安全

    Yuri Hosokawa( Part: Contributor, III. 研究の最前線:熱中症)

    少年写真新聞社  2020

  • 子ども安全管理士講座教科書 第3章7. 熱中症について考える

    Yuri Hosokawa( Part: Contributor)

    2020

  • Chapter 10 Management of Exertional Heat Stroke in Athletics: Interdisciplinary Medical Care. In Adams and Jardine Eds. Exertional Heat Illness: A Clinical and Evidence-Based Guide.

    Hosokawa Y

    Springer  2020

  • Medical Aspects of Football Cardiac, Environmental and Exertion-Related Conditions. In Mueller FO & Cantu RC, editors. Football Fatalities and Catastrophic Injuries, 1931-2016

    Stearns RL, Hosokawa Y, Endres B, Drezner J, Casa DJ( Part: Contributor)

    Carolina Academic Press  2019

  • Heat Stress During American Football. In Racinais ed. Heat Stress in Sport and Exercise: Thermophysiology of Health and Performance

    Adams WM, Belval LN, Grundstein AJ, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ( Part: Contributor)

    Springer  2019

  • Chapter 2 General Health and Medicine Considerations in Athletes In Athletic Training

    Hosokawa, Y, Hirose N, Izumi S, Uematsu D, Kasahara M Eds( Part: Contributor)

    Bunkodo  2019

  • Environmental Condition and Monitoring. In Casa DJ ed. Sport and Physical Activity in the Heat: Maximizing Performance and Safety

    Hosokawa Y, Grundstein AJ, Vanos JK, Cooper ER( Part: Contributor, 147-162)

    Springer  2018 ISBN: 9783319702179

  • Occupational Considerations. In Casa DJ ed. Sport and Physical Activity in the Heat: Maximizing Performance and Safety

    Scarneo SE, Hosokawa Y, Hoastler D( Part: Contributor, 277-290)

    Springer  2018 ISBN: 9783319702179

  • Drugs and Supplements. In Casa DJ ed. Sport and Physical Activity in the Heat: Maximizing Performance and Safety

    Katch RK, Smith MS, LaBotz M, Belval LN, Hosokawa Y( Part: Contributor, 347-366)

    Springer  2018 ISBN: 9783319702179

  • Team Sports. In Casa DJ ed. Sport and Physical Activity in the Heat: Maximizing Performance and Safety

    Nolan JD, Benjamin CM, Ng J, Hosokawa Y( Part: Contributor, 257-276)

    Springer  2018 ISBN: 9783319702179

  • Human Health and Physical Activity in the Heat

    Hosokawa Y( Part: Edit)

    Springer  2018 ISBN: 9783319758893

  • Exercise in the Heat. In: Krabak BJ, Lipman GS, Waite BL ed. The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment.

    Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Stearns RL

    Skyhorse Publishing  2017.10

  • Chapter 1. Athletic Trainer and Athletic Seasons. In: Shikakura J and Tsuruike M ed. アスレティックトレーニング 【はじめて学ぶ 健康・スポーツ科学シリーズ9】. 1st Edition.

    Nakamura C, Oumi A, Hosokawa Y(2-16)

    Kagakudoujin, Inc.  2017.03 ISBN: 9784759817072

  • Exercise in the Heat. In: Krabak BJ, Lipman GS, Waite BL ed. The Long Distance Runner’s Guide to Injury Prevention and Treatment

    Adams WM, Hosokawa Y, Stearns RL( Part: Contributor)

    Skyhorse Publishing  2017

  • Chapter 1. Athletic Trainer and Athletic Seasons. In: Shikakura J and Tsuruike M ed. アスレティックトレーニング 【はじめて学ぶ 健康・スポーツ科学シリーズ9】

    Nakamura C, Oumi A, Hosokawa Y( Part: Contributor)

    Kagakudoujin  2017

  • Chapter 13 Exertional Hyponatremia. In: Casa DJ ed. Preventing Sudden Death in Sport and Physical Activity. 2nd edition.

    Armstrong LE, McDermott BP, Hosokawa Y(219-238)

    Jones and Bartlett Learning  2016.03 ISBN: 9781284077360

  • Chapter 13 Exertional Hyponatremia. In: Casa DJ ed. Preventing Sudden Death in Sport and Physical Activity. 2nd edition

    Armstrong LE, McDermott BP, Hosokawa Y( Part: Contributor)

    Jones and Bartlett Learning  2016

  • IIRM Medical Care Manual

    Nagata T, Ishii M, Yamaguchi Y, Akitomi S, Teratani T, Hasegawa M, Hosokawa Y( Part: Joint translator)

    2016

  • Is it possible to prevent death from exertional heat stroke? In: Lopez RM ed. Quick Questions in Heat-Related Illness and Hydration: Expert Advice in Sports Medicine.

    Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ(53-56)

    Slack, Inc.  2015.02 ISBN: 9781617116476

  • Is it possible to prevent death from exertional heat stroke? In: Lopez RM ed. Quick Questions in Heat-Related Illness and Hydration: Expert Advice in Sports Medicine. 1st Edition

    Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ( Part: Contributor)

    Slack Inc.  2015

  • Medical Considerations and Risk Management: Environmental Considerations: Heat Related Illness. In: Limpisvasti O ed. The Sports Medicine Field Manual

    Casa DJ, Jardine R, Hosokawa Y( Part: Contributor, 58-64)

    American Association of Orthopaedic Surgeons  2015 ISBN: 9781625524225

  • Heat Stroke. In: Chopra JS ed. Neurology in the Tropics. 2nd Edition.

    Vandermark LW, Adams WM, Apslund C, Hosokawa Y, Casa DJ( Part: Contributor, 896-908)

    Elsevier Health Sciences  2015 ISBN: 9788131242322

▼display all

Research Projects

  • Round Table on Malignant Hyperthermia in Physically Active Populations

    National Athletic Trainers Association

    Project Year :

    2015.01
    -
    2017.04
     

 

Syllabus

▼display all

Teaching Experience

  • Clinical AT Internship (International)

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • クリニカルATインターンシップ(海外)

    立命館大学  

  • Special Lectures in Sport and Health Science 2 (AT3 Physiology of Training)

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • スポーツ健康科学特殊講義Ⅱ(AT3)

    立命館大学  

  • Freshman Seminar 2

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 基礎演習 Ⅱ

    立命館大学  

  • Sophomore Seminar 2

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 研究入門 Ⅱ

    立命館大学  

  • Clinical AT Internship (Japan)

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • クリニカルATインターンシップ(国内)

    立命館大学  

  • Advanced English

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 専門英語

    立命館大学  

  • Freshman Seminar 1

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 基礎演習 Ⅰ

    立命館大学  

  • Advanced English 1

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 専門英語(スポーツ健康科学 Ⅰ)

    立命館大学  

  • Sophomore Seminar 1

    Ritsumeikan University  

  • 研究入門 Ⅰ

    立命館大学  

▼display all

 

Committee Memberships

  • 2021.12
    -
    Now

    American College of Sports Medicine  Fellow

  • 2021.04
    -
    Now

    National Heat Safety Coalition  Medical and Science Board

  • 2021
    -
    Now

    Japanese Society of Biometeorology  Heat Illness Prevention Research Committee

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    Japan Sport Association  Research Committee for the Validation of Sport Injury Surveillance System

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    日本アスレティックトレーニング学会  代議員

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    American College of Sports Medicine  Strategic Health Initiative for Women, Sport, and Physical Activity Committee

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    IRONMAN Global Medical Advisory Board  Adjunct

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    World Lacrosse  Sports Medicine Working Group

  • 2020
    -
    Now

    日本ラクロス協会  医科学委員

  • 2019
    -
    Now

    日本アスレティックトレーニング学会  学術委員会

  • 2019
    -
    Now

    Member  Scientific Committee on Thermal Factors, International Commission on Occupational Health

  • 2018.01
    -
    Now

    Korey Stringer Institute  Medical and Science Advisory Board

  • 2018
    -
    Now

    International Institute for Race Medicine  Ambassador

  • 2017.07
    -
    Now

    Japan Athletic Trainers' Organization  Research and Education Committee

  • 2014.11
    -
    Now

    Sports Safety Japan  Advisor

  • 2021
    -
    2022

    Japan Athletic Trainers’ Organization  Board of directors

  • 2019
    -
    2021

    IOC Adverse Weather Impact Expert Working Group for the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020  Member

  • 2016.01
    -
    2020.06

    National Athletic Trainers' Association  International Committee

▼display all