Updated on 2024/05/20

写真a

 
SHINKAWA, Seiji
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Education and Integrated Arts and Sciences, School of Education
Job title
Professor
Degree
Master of Arts ( Sophia University )
Doctor of Philosophy ( Sophia University )

Research Experience

  • 2014.04
    -
    2019.03

    Rikkyo University   Graduate School of Arts   Part-time Lecturer

  • 2012.04
    -
    2019.03

    Hakuoh University Faculty of Business Administration   Professor

  • 2005.04
    -
    2012.03

    Hakuoh University   Associate Professor

  • 2009.10
    -
    2010.07

    Campion Hall, University of Oxford   Academic Visitor

  • 2001.04
    -
    2005.03

    Hakuoh University   Assistant Professor

  • 2000.04
    -
    2001.03

    Hakuoh University Women's College   Assistant Professor

  • 1999.04
    -
    2000.03

    Tohogakuen University   Part-time Lecturer

  • 1995.04
    -
    1998.03

    Tohogakuen University   Part-time Lecturer

▼display all

Education Background

  • 1998.04
    -
    1999.03

    University of Oxford   Campion Hall   Graduate Visiting Student  

  • 1995.04
    -
    1998.03

    Sophia University   Faculty of English and American Literature   Doctoral Course  

  • 1993.04
    -
    1995.03

    Sophia University   Faculty of English and American Literature   Master's Course  

  • 1989.04
    -
    1993.03

    Sophia University   Faculty of Literature   Department of English Literature  

Research Areas

  • English linguistics   Old and Middle English

Research Interests

  • History of the English language

  • Middle English

  • Old English

 

Papers

  • From People's King to King of a Country: The Development of the Place Element Modifying the Title Paired in Apposition with a Personal Name Traced in the Peterborough Chronicle

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Transactions of the Philological Society   122 ( 1 ) 151 - 167  2024.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Abstract

    A king was typically referred to as people's king in the early period of Old English, whereas today, king of a country is the most commonly used. This study attempts to trace the development of the place element modifying the title paired in apposition with a personal name in the tradition of vernacular English historiography as represented by the Peterborough Chronicle. There existed a strong tendency to specify a smaller land area (city, town, etc.) with the genitive form of the name of the place or with a prepositional phrase involving the place‐name and a larger one (kingdom, shire, etc.) with the genitive form of the name of the people living there in Early Old English. In later periods, however, the prepositional phrase was left as the only place element available for either a smaller or larger land area. Various prepositions heading the prepositional phrase became limited during the Old English period to just one in Early Middle English. Thus, the shift from people's king to king of a country was almost complete in Early Middle English. These findings are related to more general patterns of syntactic change in the noun phrase in English to highlight their current relevance.

    DOI

  • 単体通時言語資料としてのPeterborough Chronicleの有用性: 人名を含む同格表現における一検証

    新川清治

    中世英語英文学研究の多様性とその展望     411 - 426  2020.11

  • The Influence of Verse Form on the Relative Order of the Name and the Title King within an Appositive Phrase in Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Anglia   135 ( 2 ) 291 - 316  2017.06  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Abstract

    This article is an attempt to determine possible factors that affect the arrangement of a name and the titlekingin apposition in the transitional period from Old English to Middle English from a prosodic perspective as a first step to explain how preferred patterns have shifted from the types represented byAlfred King,the King AlfredandAlfred the Kingin Old English to almost exclusively the type represented byKing Alfredin Present-Day English. Contrary to the common and generally sensible judgment of avoiding poetic texts in a syntactic investigation such as this, the present study analyzes the two extant versions of Laȝamon’sBrut, an Early Middle English metrical chronicle, on the grounds that verse may serve a better purpose than prose when intonation and rhythm are centrally involved, as is the case with this study. Use of searchable large-scale electronic corpora may at first glance seem more suitable for research of this kind, but such studies involving multiple texts of different periods, places and types are prone to oversimplification, and crucial details may be missed or glossed over. For a more detailed and coherent account of the development of appositive constructions, this study provides an in-depth analysis of the linguistic situation in a single body of closely related texts.

    DOI

    Scopus

  • The Zero Period of Spelling Standardization: Two Contrasting Manuscripts of Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Studies in Medieval English Language and Literature   30   29 - 40  2015.12  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Possible Pathways from Agreeing to Non-agreeing Genitive Appositives As Seen in Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Transactions of the Philological Society   113 ( 1 ) 127 - 136  2015.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    In Old English, genitive nouns in apposition are both marked for case. King Arthur's men, for example, would be Arthornures cyninges menn, Arthornures menn thornaes cyninges, among a few other possibilities. Non-agreeing genitive appositives such as Arthornur kinges men and Arthornures men (thorne) king began to appear in the Early Middle English period. The analysis in two versions of La?amon's Brut suggests two possible pathways through which they were established. One is the development of the name and the title as a compound-like unit, which marks genitive only at the end of the second element as in Arthornur kinges men, and the other is ambiguous appositive or predicative expressions such as Arthornures men (thorne) king, interpretable as either King Arthur's men' or men of Arthur, (who is) (the) king', which seem to have led post-head constituents of split genitives to appear in the nominative or unmarked case, resulting in genitive marking only on the pre-head components. These new usages are thus originally and essentially independent of the developments of the case-marking system itself.

    DOI

    Scopus

  • Inorganic -e and double n in the Caligula Brut: implications for case marking

    Seiji Shinkawa

    English Language & Linguistics   18 ( 3 ) 387 - 405  2014.11  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This article investigates variant forms of the demonstrative 'that' and the adjective in the Caligula Manuscript of La.amon's Brut and concludes that they to a large extent maintain the traditional category distinction between the accusative and the dative by the use of the suffixes -ne and -Vn (where V stands for any vowel) respectively. There are, however, factors that potentially compromise the status of these terminations as case markers: phonetic reduction (which has often been invoked), capricious addition or deletion of final e, occasional doubling or simplification of nasals, and simply unexpected choices of forms in the paradigm. These seem to be consistent with the sort of mistakes that scribes might occasionally make when faced with an original that has a different orthographical and morphological system from their own, and they are not as disruptive of the case-marking system as at first sight they might appear. For one thing, they occur rather rarely and are generally outnumbered by historically expected forms; for another, the resultant unexpected case forms, usually with the stem vowel preferred by the historical forms in the case of the demonstrative, are predominantly accompanied by a historically motivated case form of their head noun. The status of accusative -ne and dative -Vn, in fact, appears to be stable enough to lead to the development of a system or subsystem of indicating case regardless of gender considerations in their respective case contexts. These suffixes can therefore be treated validly as independent case markers, although in concrete cases the possibility always exists that there is an optional final e, an unhistorical double or single n, or an unexpected choice of inflectional forms.

    DOI

    Scopus

  • His-Genitive as a Morphological Variant of S-Genitive: An Analysis of Early Examples in the Otho Manuscript of Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Neuphilologische Mitteilungen   114 ( 4 ) 473 - 480  2013  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    An examination of early examples of the his-genitive in the Otho manuscript of La3amon's Brut suggests its orthographical origin as a variant of the historically expected s-genitive, but at this stage they are already different morphologically, though they remain identical syntactically. Their orthographical and morphological independence as well as their lessened degree of attachment with their head noun appears to have advanced their clitic-like nature, and when the process is complete, the group genitive becomes available. Once the clitic status is attained, his, with its more syntactic freedom, may be said to have become more prone to reanalysis as a pronoun, and the resultant construction is further generalized to the feminine and the plural to develop her- and their-genitives. This reanalysis could have happened even before the cliticization of his, however, given its obvious formal similarity to the pronoun, and, in fact, they appear to have been associated with each other earlier on to lead to the morphological independence of his from the inflection. It may be just that the incorporation of the reanalysis into the system or sub-system of grammar has to wait until the cliticization of the genitive or possessive marker. Thus it appears that the necessary components are all present in Otho to be further exploited for the later development of his- and other related genitive constructions.

  • Unhistorical Gender Assignment in Laȝamon's Brut: Innovative Attributive Morphology as a Case Marker

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Multiple Perspectives on English Philology and History of Linguistics: A Festschrift for Shoichi Watanabe on His 80th Birthday     91 - 123  2010  [Refereed]

  • 英語における文法的性の消失について

    新川清治

    フィロロギア     218 - 224  2001.07  [Refereed]

▼display all

Books and Other Publications

  • 英語学: 現代英語をより深く知るために

    新川清治( Part: Contributor, 第31章「英文の構造: 語彙力だけでは英語は分からない」)

    春風社  2016.04

  • Unhistorical Gender Assignment in Laȝamon's Brut: A Case Study of a Late Stage in the Development of Grammatical Gender toward Its Ultimate Loss

    Seiji Shinkawa( Part: Sole author)

    Peter Lang  2012.09 ISBN: 9783034311243

Presentations

  • Changes of Perspective and Focus in the Peterborough Chronicle as Reflected in the Use and Distribution of Place Elements Modifying Titles Paired in Apposition with Personal Names

    Shinkawa, Seiji

    The 39th Congress of the Japan Society for Medieval English Studies 

    Presentation date: 2023.12

    Event date:
    2023.12
     
     
  • Relative Placement of the Name and the Title King in Apposition: Its Possible Pathways of Change

    Seiji Shinkawa

    Presentation date: 2018.06

  • Relative Placement of the Name and the Title within an Appositive Phrase in Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    The 31st Congress of the Japan Society for Medieval English Studies 

    Presentation date: 2015.12

  • Genitives in the Otho Manuscript of Laȝamon's Brut, the Early Middle English Metrical Chronicle

    Seiji Shinkawa

    The Thirty-Third Conference of the English Linguistic Society of Japan 

    Presentation date: 2015.11

  • The Zero Period of Spelling Standardization: Two Contrasting Manuscripts of Laȝamon's Brut

    Seiji Shinkawa

    The 30th Congress, the Japan Society for Medieval English Studies 

    Presentation date: 2014.12

Research Projects

  • Study on the process of the loss of grammatical gender

Misc

  • (書評) Simon Horobin, Does Spelling Matter? (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013)

    新川清治

    Studies in Medieval English Language and Literature   32   153 - 165  2017.07  [Refereed]  [Invited]

    Book review, literature introduction, etc.  

  • (書評) 寺澤盾,『英単語の世界: 多義語と意味変化から見る』(東京: 中央公論新社, 2016)

    新川清治

    英語教育   65 ( 13 ) 91 - 92  2017.03  [Invited]

    Book review, literature introduction, etc.  

  • 例外から浮かび上がる本質: 進行形,時制の一致を例として

    新川清治

    英語教育   65 ( 9 ) 62 - 63  2016.11  [Invited]

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (trade magazine, newspaper, online media)  

  • イディオムの考古学: なぜon footはon feetと言わないのか

    新川清治

    英語教育   63 ( 6 ) 18 - 19  2012.09  [Invited]

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (trade magazine, newspaper, online media)  

 

Syllabus

▼display all

 

Sub-affiliation

  • Faculty of Education and Integrated Arts and Sciences   Graduate School of Education