Updated on 2024/05/27

写真a

 
SAITO, Yukiko
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Political Science and Economics, School of Political Science and Economics
Job title
Professor

Research Experience

  • 2018.09
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Faculty of Political Science and Economics   Associate Professor

  • 2014.04
    -
    2018.08

    Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry   Senior Fellow

  • 2012.04
    -
    2014.03

    Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry   Fellow

  • 2007.06
    -
    2012.03

    Fujitsu Research Institute   Economic Research Center   Senior Associate

  • 2002.04
    -
    2007.05

    Fujitsu Research Institute   Economic Research Center   Research Associate

  • 1999.04
    -
    2002.03

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science   Research Fellow (DC1)

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Research Areas

  • Economic policy   Spatial Economics

Research Interests

  • Knowledge Spillover

  • Agglomeration

  • Inter-firm Network

 

Papers

  • Does Geographical Proximity Matter in Small Business Lending? Evidence from Changes in Main Bank Relationships*

    Arito Ono, Yukiko U. Saito, Koji Sakai, Iichiro Uesugi

    Asia-Pacific Journal of Financial Studies    2023.10

     View Summary

    Abstract

    We examine the causal link between the geographical distance between firms and their main bank and the termination of main bank relationships, using the exogenous change in firm–main bank distances brought about by bank branch consolidations in Japan. Our findings are threefold. First, an increase in lending distance increases the likelihood that firms switch their main bank. Second, the average lending distance for firms that switched to a new main bank decreased after the switch. Third, the lending distance of new firm–main bank relationships after the switch had a positive impact on the probability of default of small firms.

    DOI

    Scopus

  • China's impact on regional employment: Propagation through input-output linkages and co-location patterns

    Shuhei Kainuma, Yukiko U. Saito

    WORLD ECONOMY   45 ( 11 ) 3559 - 3601  2022.11  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    How do imports from China affect local labour markets in Japan? We examine this question using commuting zones as regional units and analysing shock propagation through supply chains and co-location patterns. Applying the method proposed by Autor et al. (American Economic Review, 103, 2121, 2013) and Acemoglu, Autor et al. (Journal of Labor Economics, 34, S141, 2016), we examine the impact of import shocks on regional manufacturing employment using input-output tables which allows us to investigate the propagation of shocks to both upstream and downstream industries and to relate the regional impact to industry co-location patterns. We find that the negative direct effect on local employment is underestimated in previous studies that do not consider the regional propagation of the shock through supply chains, especially the positive shock to downstream industries. Downstream industries in Japan, for example, significantly benefit from imports from China as they lower input prices and increase employment. In contrast to downstream industries, we find no significant impact on upstream industries. Our results imply that the direct negative effect on local labour markets is somewhat mitigated by effects on downstream industries within the same region.

    DOI

    Scopus

    2
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Indirect trade and direct trade: Evidence from Japanese firm transaction data

    Tadashi Ito, Yukiko Umeno Saito

    WORLD ECONOMY   44 ( 2 ) 444 - 461  2021.02  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This paper attempts to establish stylised facts on direct and indirect trade and its relationship with firm performance using firm transaction data of Japanese firms, with the special goal of shedding light on regional aspects of indirect exports/imports. The major findings are as follows: (a) firms in regional areas are smaller in size than those in a metropolitan area, and firms in regional areas are less likely to participate in export or import, even after controlling for firm size; (b) direct and indirect exports/imports in terms of the number of firms, employees, and sales values represent 40%-70% of the regional economies; (c) indirect exporters/importers in the previous period are likely to be direct exporters/importers in the subsequent period, which suggests the effects of learning in terms of procedures for conducting exporting/importing, searching for customers/suppliers, and gaining information on foreign markets; and (d) both direct export/import firms and indirect export/import firms in the previous period tend to have higher firm performance in the subsequent period.

    DOI

    Scopus

    1
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • How does the global network of research collaboration affect the quality of innovation?

    Takashi Iino, Hiroyasu Noue, Yukiko U. Saito, Yasuyuki Todo

    JAPANESE ECONOMIC REVIEW   72 ( 1 ) 5 - 48  2021.01  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This study examines how research collaboration of firms affects the quality of their innovation outcomes using comprehensive patent data for firms in the world from 1991 to 2010. Identifying research collaboration by co-patenting relationships, we find that research collaboration with other firms, particularly with foreign firms, leads to substantial improvement in innovation quality. We also observe a positive effect of the brokerage in the global network, especially for firms with international collaboration links. These results are applicable to the effect on the quality of innovation achieved individually without any collaboration. Therefore, our findings emphasize the importance of links with a variety of partners, particularly with foreign partners to improve innovation performance. Finally, we find that the collaboration effect is larger in the 2000s than in the 1990s and varies depending on firm size and across countries.

    DOI

    Scopus

    12
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Supply Chain Disruptions: Evidence from the Great East Japan Earthquake*

    Vasco M Carvalho, Makoto Nirei, Yukiko U Saito, Alireza Tahbaz-Salehi

    The Quarterly Journal of Economics   136 ( 2 ) 1255 - 1321  2020.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Abstract

    Exploiting the exogenous and regional nature of the Great East Japan Earthquake of 2011, this article provides a quantification of the role of input-output linkages as a mechanism for the propagation and amplification of shocks. We document that the disruption caused by the disaster propagated upstream and downstream along supply chains, affecting the direct and indirect suppliers and customers of disaster-stricken firms. Using a general equilibrium model of production networks, we then obtain an estimate for the overall macroeconomic impact of the disaster by taking these propagation effects into account. We find that the earthquake and its aftermaths resulted in a 0.47 percentage point decline in Japan’s real GDP growth in the year following the disaster.

    DOI

    Scopus

    167
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Localization of collaborations in knowledge creation

    Hiroyasu Inoue, Kentaro Nakajima, Yukiko Umeno Saito

    The Annals of Regional Science   62 ( 1 ) 119 - 140  2019.02  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This study investigates the localization of collaboration in knowledge creation by using data on Japanese patent applications. Applying distance-based methods, we obtained the following results. First, collaborations are significantly localized at the 5% level with a localization range of approximately 100km. Second, the localization of collaboration is observed in most technologies. Third, the extent of localization was stable from 1986 to 2005 despite extensive developments in information and communications technology that facilitate communication between remote organizations. Fourth, the extent of localization is substantially greater in inter-firm collaborations than in intra-firm collaborations. Furthermore, in inter-firm collaborations, the extent of localization is greater in collaborations with small firms. This result suggests that geographic proximity mitigates the firm-border effects on collaborations, especially for small firms.

    DOI

    Scopus

    12
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Production Networks, Geography, and Firm Performance

    Andrew B Bernard, Andreas Moxnes, Yukiko U Saito

    Journal of Political Economy   127 ( 2 ) 639 - 688  2019.02  [Refereed]

  • Indirect exports and wholesalers: Evidence from interfirm transaction network data

    Daisuke Fujii, Yukako Ono, Yukiko Umeno Saito

    JAPAN AND THE WORLD ECONOMY   44   35 - 47  2017.12  [Refereed]

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    A substantial fraction of international trade is facilitated by wholesalers, who enable manufacturers to indirectly export their products to foreign markets. Using large-scale Japanese interfirm transaction network data, this paper investigates the features of both direct and indirect exporters as well as international wholesalers. As predicted by a simple Melitz-type trade model with indirect export alternative, the sorting pattern is confirmed in our data, and the distributions of sales and labor productivity are ordered for direct, indirect, and non-exporters in terms of first order stochastic dominance. Multinomial logit analysis is also consistent with the model, which assumes lower fixed cost and higher marginal cost for indirect exporters compared to direct exporters. We also find that the number of suppliers raises the probability of direct exporting implying a cost sharing mechanism of firms with more suppliers. On the other hand, the number of customers raises the probability of exporting in general (both indirect and direct) implying a higher product appeal and broader demand base for firms who have more customers. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI

    Scopus

    9
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Localization of knowledge-creating establishments

    Hiroyasu Inoue, Kentaro Nakajima, Yukiko Umeno Saito

    JAPAN AND THE WORLD ECONOMY   43   23 - 29  2017.09  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This study investigates the localization of establishment-level knowledge creation using data from a Japanese patent database. Using distance-based methods, we obtain the following results. First, Japanese knowledge-creating establishments defined by patenting experience are significantly localized at the 5% level, with a localization range of approximately 80 km. Second, localization is observed for all patent technology classes, and the extent of localization has a positive relationship with the level of technology measured by R&D investment. Finally, the extent of localization is stronger for establishments that are more productive in terms of both the number of patents and the number of citations received, i.e., quantitatively and qualitatively. These results indicate that geographical proximity is important for knowledge spillover, particularly for establishments that demand external knowledge intensively. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI

    Scopus

    6
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • 被災地以外の企業における東日本大震災の影響 — サプライチェーンにみる企業間のネットワーク構造とその含意—

    齊藤有希子

    日本統計学会誌   42 ( 1 ) 135 - 144  2012.09  [Refereed]

  • Measuring economic localization: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data

    Kentaro Nakajima, Yukiko Umeno Saito, Iichiro Uesugi

    JOURNAL OF THE JAPANESE AND INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIES   26 ( 2 ) 201 - 220  2012.06  [Refereed]

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    Nakajima, Kentaro, Saito, Yukiko Umeno, and Uesugi, lichiro-Measuring economic localization: Evidence from Japanese firm-level data
    This paper examines location patterns of Japan's manufacturing industries using a unique firm-level dataset on the geographic location of firms. Following the point-pattern approach proposed by Duranton and Overman (2005), we find the following. First, about half of Japan's manufacturing industries can be classified as localized and the number of localized industries is largest for a distance level of 40 km or less. Second, several industries in the textile mill products sector are among the most localized, which is similar to findings for the UK, suggesting that there exist common factors across countries determining the concentration of industrial activities. Third, the distribution of distances between entrant (exiting) firms and remaining firms is, in most industries, not significantly different from a random distribution. These results suggest that most industries in Japan neither become more localized nor more dispersed over time and are in line with similar findings by Duranton and Overman (2008) for the UK. Fourth, a comparison with the service sector indicates that the share of localized industries is higher in manufacturing than in services, although the extent of localization among the most localized manufacturing industries is smaller than that among the most localized service industries, including financial service industries. J. Japanese Int. Economies 26 (2) (2012) 201-220. Faculty of Economics, Tohoku University, 27-1 Kawauchi, Aoba-ku, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8576, Japan; Fujitsu Research Institute, New Pier Takeshiba South Tower, 16-1 Kaigan 1-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-0022, Japan: Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University, 2-1 Naka, Kunitachi-shi, Tokyo 186-8603, Japan. (C) 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    DOI

    Scopus

    39
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • The bursting of housing bubble as jamming phase transition

    Katsuhiro Nishinari, Mitsuru Iwamura, Yukiko Umeno Saito, Tsutomu Watanabe

    Journal of Physics: Conference Series   221  2010  [Refereed]

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    In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing on transaction volume incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation on highway by comparing data taken from the U.S. housing market. Our result suggests that transaction volume could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

    DOI

    Scopus

    4
    Citation
    (Scopus)
  • Do larger firms have more interfirm relationships?

    Yukiko Umeno Saito, Tsutomu Watanabe, Mitsuru Iwamura

    PHYSICA A-STATISTICAL MECHANICS AND ITS APPLICATIONS   383 ( 1 ) 158 - 163  2007.09  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    In this study, we investigate interfirm networks by employing a unique data set containing information on more than 800,000 Japanese firms, about half of all corporate firms currently operating in Japan. First, we find that the number of relationships, measured by the indegree, has a fat-tail distribution, implying that there exist "hub" firms with a large number of relationships. Moreover, the indegree distribution for those hub firms also exhibits a fat tail, suggesting the existence of "super-hub" firms. Second, we find that larger firms tend to have more counterparts, but the relationship between firms' size and the number of their counterparts is not necessarily proportional; firms that already have a large number of counterparts tend to grow without proportionately expanding it. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    DOI

    Scopus

    37
    Citation
    (Scopus)

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Research Projects

  • New technology and employment

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2022.04
    -
    2025.03
     

  • Firm metabolism and inter-firm network in aging society

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2020.07
    -
    2025.03
     

  • Economic analysis on patents and innovations based on long-term micro-data

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2024.03
     

  • Inter-firm Network and Firm Growth in Firm Lifecycle

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2018.04
    -
    2021.03
     

    Saito Yukiko

     View Summary

    This study examined the role of inter-firm transaction network empirically and theoretically by constructing long-period panel data firm-level transaction. Analyzing characteristics of firm growth, dynamics of transaction network and firm exit and their dependency on firm age and CEO age, theoretical model is constructed. Comparative analysis of economic shocks such as COVID19, Lehman shock and Great East Japan Earthquake, on macro economics has been done. Effect on macro economics is evaluated quantitatively including spillover effect in terms of cleansing effect by firm exit (extensive margin) and output adjustment (intensive margin).

  • Spatial economics on innovation

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2017.04
    -
    2021.03
     

    NAKAJIMA Kentaro

     View Summary

    The purpose of this research project is to empirically understand the spatial features of long-term innovation activities in Japan. For this purpose, we quantitatively capture the long-term innovation activities by digitizing the bibliographic information of patents in the prewar period in Japan. By using the data, we investigate the spatial features of innovation activities in the prewar period in Japan. In particular, by focusing on the geographic characteristics of collaborative research relationships, the analysis revealed new findings about the geographic distribution of innovation activities in the prewar period, such as the fact that innovation activities at that time were already concentrated in major cities, that collaborative research increased throughout the period, and that the distance between collaborative inventors was geographically close to each other.

  • Inventor Network and Knowledge Creation Activity

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2016.04
    -
    2019.03
     

    SAITO Yukiko, Carvalho Vasco

     View Summary

    We examine productivity of organization, focusing on inter-inventor collaboration network as a new bond of different knowledge and driver of innovation. Especially, we focus on inventor’s mobility across organizations which is supposed to change inter-inventor network. We found that most inventors move to organization within the same firm, between firms which have shareholding relations or transaction relations. Further, we found that such inter-firm relations causes better performance and knowledge of new technology propagate rapidly to organization with more mobile inventors and more experiences of collaboration.

  • Evaluation of disaster risk and policy based on nation-wide supply chain

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2015.04
    -
    2019.03
     

    Inoue Hiroyasu, Iino Takashi

     View Summary

    I mainly published two papers. They are about the idiosyncratic shock and supply-chain networks and about the controllability of supply-chain networks. The idiosyncratic shock examines how consecutive productions in firms occur when triggered by demand shocks, which can be rephrased by control of the economy or fiscal policy. We use the production-inventory model and observed data that exhaustively include a production network of Japanese firms. Mainly we found that the size of consecutive productions follows a power law. Regarding controllability, we investigate a firm production network observed exhaustively in Japan and determine which firms should be directly or indirectly controlled using the framework of controllability. We mainly obtain the following results that each industry has diverse share of firms that should be controlled directly or indirectly. The configurations of the shares in industries are different between demand and supply sides.

  • Inter-firm transaction network and bank lending

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2014.04
    -
    2017.03
     

    Ogura Yoshiaki

     View Summary

    This study demonstrates theoretically and empirically that a firm with a higher influence as a procurer in a supply network is more likely to obtain a rescue loan at a lower interest rate when it is under a financial distress. A bank will evaluate not only the standalone performance of the firm but the propagation effect through the supply network. Consequently, the lending cost is relatively smaller for those with a higher influence coefficient in a financial distress. This effect is larger for regional banks that often have a stronger market power in the regional financial market.

  • Innovation dynamics and development of spatial economics

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2014.04
    -
    2017.03
     

    FUJITA Masahisa, TAKATOSHI TABUCHI

     View Summary

    The new field of spatial economics has been developed rapidly since the early 1990s by economists in Japan, U.S. and Europe, aiming for the unified theory of geographical economics. This research has succeeded in the further development of spatial economics by combining traditional economic models with new micromodels of knowledge creation and transfer. With the application of newly developed spatial models, empirical studies of innovation dynamics have been successfully conducted in the context of cities and industrial agglomerations in the global economy.

  • Study on Geographical Properties of Knowledge Spillover using Micro Location Data

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2013.04
    -
    2016.03
     

    SAITO YUKIKO

     View Summary

    This study focuses on knowledge spillover as a agglomeration externality and investigate the geographical location of knowledge-creating activity and geographical friction in collaboration. It is found that knowledge-creating activities are more localized than other economic activities and that geographical friction is persistent. We also find that both common knowledge and diverse knowledge are important for collaboration and inventor’s mobility increases organization’s productivity, suggesting knowledge spillover between inventors. We also focus on transaction network which relates to firm performance.

  • Study of layered innovation networks that consist of individuals, organizations, and regions

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2012.04
    -
    2016.03
     

    Inoue Hiroyasu, SAITO Yukiko, NAKAJIMA Kentaro

     View Summary

    We study joint-applications on patent data of Japan and the United States. Inventor teams show better performance than solo inventors. Repetition of collaboration by the same teams show degradation of performance. Firm teams show worse performance in repetition than inventor teams. If a team publishes a patent with high impact, the team tend to have a lot of consecutive works. If a member who repeated a lot of works in the same team moves to a new team, the inventor shows better performance than the other members who stay in the team with a lot of works. We find establishments that apply for patents aggregate in 80 km and joint applications between establishments aggregate in 100 km.

  • Study of Firm Agglomeration Properties using Micro Location Data

    Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research

    Project Year :

    2010
    -
    2012
     

    SAITO Yukiko

     View Summary

    In this study, we focus on agglomeration pattern of firms by industry in terms of spatial structure of economic activity, by using firm’s micro-location data (latitude and longitude) and distance-based index. We found that firm’s agglomeration is statistically significant for about half of the manufacturing industry within the range of about 40km. We also found that inter-firm transaction and knowledge spillover, which causes industrial agglomeration, are taken place within significantly narrow areas. The number of firms which have transaction partners away in distance is very limited and the importance of distance in inter-firm collaboration is stable regardless of prevalence of information technology.

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Syllabus

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Sub-affiliation

  • Faculty of Political Science and Economics   Graduate School of Political Science

  • Faculty of Political Science and Economics   Graduate School of Economics