Updated on 2021/12/08

写真a

 
SHIMOKAWA, Satoru
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Political Science and Economics, School of Political Science and Economics
Job title
Associate Professor

Education

  •  
    -
    2007

    Cornell University,   Applied Economics and Management,   Ph.D.  

  •  
    -
    2003

    Cornell University,   Applied Economics and Management,   M.S.  

  •  
    -
    2000

    Hokkaido University,   Agricultural Economics,   B.S.  

Degree

  • 博士

Research Experience

  • 2016.04
    -
    Now

    Waseda University,   School of Political Science and Economics,   Associate Professor

  • 2015.07
    -
    2016.03

    The Institute of Developing Economies,   Research Fellow

  • 2007.07
    -
    2015.06

    Hong Kong University of Science &Technology,   Division of Social Science,   Assistant Professor

 

Research Areas

  • Agricultural and food economics

Research Interests

  • Agricultural Economics

  • Development Economics

  • Food Policy

Papers

  • The Urban-Rural Gap in the Demand for Food Safety in China: the Role of Food Label Knowledge

    Shimokawa, Satoru, Dezhuang Hu, Dandan Li, Hong Cheng

    Agricultural Economics   forthcoming  2020

  • Promoting Dietary Guidelines and Environmental Sustainability in China

    Lei Lei, Satoru Shimokawa

    China Economic Review   59 ( February ) 101087  2020

    DOI

  • The Effect of Health Information on Smoking Intensity: Does Addiction Matter?

    Zeng, Sen, Satoru Shimokawa

    Applied Economics   52 ( 22 ) 2408 - 2426  2020

    DOI

  • Partial Smoking Ban and Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Japan

    Zeng, Sen, Haruko Noguchi, Satoru Shimokawa

    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health   16 ( 15 ) 2804 - 2804  2019.08

     View Summary

    Implementing smoking bans is a worldwide common practice for tobacco control. However, if the policy prohibits smoking partially rather than comprehensively, it may increase nonsmokers’ exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) in nonprohibited places. This paper investigates how a partial smoking ban affected nonsmokers’ SHS exposure (measured by frequency of having exposure to SHS in days per month) in households, workplaces, and restaurants by examining the case of a partial smoking ban introduced in a large Japanese prefecture in 2013. Using data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHNS) in 2010, 2013, and 2016 (n = 30,244) and the Comprehensive Survey of Living Conditions (CSLC) from 2001 to 2016 (n = 2,366,896), this paper employs a difference-in-differences (DID) approach. We found that the partial smoking ban significantly increased their SHS exposure in households and workplaces by 2.64 days and 4.70 days per month, respectively, while it did not change nonsmokers’ SHS exposure in restaurants. The results imply that the smoking ban displaced smokers from public places to private places. We also found that neither smokers’ smoking status nor smoking intensity changed significantly after implementing the partial smoking ban. Comprehensive smoking bans are needed to better protect nonsmokers from SHS exposure.

    DOI

  • Emerging Markets for US Pork in China: Experimental Evidence from Mainland and Hong Kong Consumers

    David L. Ortega, Maolong Chen, Satoru Shimokawa, H. Holly Wang

    JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS   42 ( 2 ) 275 - 290  2017.05  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    A major concern for international marketers is how products will be received by foreign consumers in other markets. This study uses choice modeling to assess Chinese consumer preferences for pork and evaluate the potential demand for U.S. pork in the cities of Guangzhou and Hong Kong. We find that differences in preferences for domestic versus imported pork can be explained, in part, by consumers' level of patriotism. Marketing pork with a food safety claim can increase market demand for U.S. products, and accounting for differences in nationalistic attitudes can aid marketing efforts.

  • Why can calorie posting be apparently ineffective? The roles of two conflicting learning effects

    Satoru Shimokawa

    FOOD POLICY   64   107 - 120  2016.10  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    We investigate why the aggregate effect of calorie posting on calorie consumption can be insignificant by decomposing the learning effect into two conflicting components: a calorie-decreasing effect of learning that one was underestimating caloric content (LUE), and a calorie-increasing effect of learning that one was overestimating caloric content (LOE). Our lab snack-order experiments demonstrate the existence of the LUE effect (-8.3%) and the LOE effect (+4.8%), where the aggregate learning effect is -5.8%. Our results also imply that the LUE can be cancelled out by a positive saliency effect, while the undesirable saliency effect may be mitigated by combining the calorie posting with information about daily calorie needs. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI

  • Nutritional impacts of rising food prices in African countries: a review

    Xiaohua Yu, Satoru Shimokawa

    FOOD SECURITY   8 ( 5 ) 985 - 997  2016.10  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    This paper investigates the influences of food price spikes on nutritional outcomes in six African countries: DR Congo, Ethiopia, Malawi, Nigeria, Tanzania, and Uganda. Drawing on the estimates of food demand elasticity with respect to food prices in previous studies, we constructed the elasticity of calorie and protein consumption with respect to food prices. We find that, while increasing cereal prices has the largest negative influences on both calorie and protein consumption in all the countries, the magnitude of the influences may differ by regions and the country's dietary patterns. The negative influences are particularly large in rural areas and in the countries whose diets highly depend on a single staple cereal while small in the countries whose diets have alternative staple foods. Our findings highlight the importance of stabilizing cereal prices to reduce calorie deficiency while it may not be enough to improve protein deficiency.

    DOI

  • Consumer Preferences for US Beef Products: A Meta-Analysis

    Yu, Xiaohua, Zhifeng Gao, Satoru Shimokawa

    Italian Review of Agricultural Economics   71 ( 2 ) 177 - 195  2016

    DOI

  • Sustainable meat consumption in China

    Satoru Shimokawa

    JOURNAL OF INTEGRATIVE AGRICULTURE   14 ( 6 ) 1023 - 1032  2015  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Sustainable meat consumption is critical to achieve a sustainable food system because meat products are among the most energy-intensive, ecologically burdensome, and ethically concerned foods. This paper focuses on the case of China and discusses the difficulties and possibilities to achieve sustainable meat consumption in China by reviewing previous empirical studies and descriptive statistics, particularly considering consumers' dietary transitions in quantity and quality following China's rapid economic growth. Given China's sheer size of population and meat demand, the sustainable meat consumption in China is also a relevant topic in the global food system.

    DOI

  • When Does Dietary Knowledge Matter to Obesity and Overweight Prevention?

    Shimokawa, Satoru

    Food Policy   38 ( 1 ) 35 - 46  2013

    DOI

  • Nutrient Intake of the Poor and its Implications for the Nutritional Effect of Cereal Price Subsidies: Evidence from China

    Satoru Shimokawa

    WORLD DEVELOPMENT   38 ( 7 ) 1001 - 1011  2010.07  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    We incorporate habit formation into an analysis of the effect or cereal price changes on the nutrient intake of the poor in China. We find that the poor's nutrient intake responds asymmetrically to declines and increases in cereal prices, and that the asymmetric response of their fat intake may be due to habit formation. Our results also imply that introducing cereal price subsidies can increase their total energy intake by increasing their calorie intake from fat and protein, while ending such subsidies would insignificantly affect their total energy intake, but further increase their calorie intake from fat and protein. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI

  • ASYMMETRIC INTRAHOUSEHOLD ALLOCATION OF CALORIES IN CHINA

    Satoru Shimokawa

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS   92 ( 3 ) 873 - 888  2010.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    To analyze intrahousehold calorie allocation, we propose a new framework that takes into account asymmetric consumption behavior due to liquidity constraints and loss aversion We find that intrahousehold calorie allocation responds asymmetrically to expected declines and increases in household food availability in China Compared with previous studies based on symmetric consumption behavior, our framework provides stronger evidence of gender bias in intrahousehold calorie allocation among children in urban areas and among elderly people in rural areas, and of demographic bias between girls and prime-age adults in both urban and rural areas. Implications for demographic targeting in nutrition programs are discussed

    DOI

  • Understanding the differences in obesity among working adults between Taiwan and China

    Satoru Shimokawa, Hung-Hao Chang, Per Pinstrup-Andersen

    ASIA PACIFIC JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NUTRITION   18 ( 1 ) 88 - 95  2009  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Objective: To investigate the difference in the prevalence of obesity and the associations between the risk of obesity and socioeconomic factors with regard to working adults in China and Taiwan. Data: the 2000 China Health and Nutrition Survey and the 2001 National Health Interview Survey in Taiwan, which contains information from 20-60-year-old working adults in China (3,067 men and 2,998 women) and Taiwan (6,475 men and 6,341 women). Method: Variables were converted to cross-economy comparable forms, and the estimated prevalence of obesity across socioeconomic groups was compared between China and Taiwan. Probit models were used to examine the associations between socioeconomic factors and the probability of being obese. Results: In China, the prevalence of obesity was higher in the higher income, more educated, and more sedentary occupation groups, while it was higher in the lower income and less educated groups in Taiwan. Also, our results indicate that occupational types rather than income and education levels are more significantly associated with the probability of being obese in China, whereas income and education levels rather than occupational types are more significantly associated with the probability of being obese in Taiwan. These findings may indicate that, when an economy becomes more developed, the association between obesity risk and income and education levels becomes more significant and negative especially among women, while the association between obesity risk and occupational types decreases especially among men.

  • Do poverty and poor health and nutrition increase the risk of armed conflict onset?

    Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Satoru Shimokawa

    FOOD POLICY   33 ( 6 ) 513 - 520  2008.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    We analyze the effects of improving the economic, food security and health status on the risk of armed cotntectflict onset, focusing on the factors related to the millennium development goals. We employ the discrete-time hazard model that allows us to examine the time-varying effects of socioeconomic factors controlling for the reverse effect of conflict. Our results show that income poverty and poor health and nutritional status are more significantly associated with armed conflict onset than GDP per capita, annual GDP growth. and the ratio of primary commodity exports over GDP. In particular, poor health and nutritional status seems to play a key role in inducing armed conflicts in Poor Countries. These results indicate that, when a majority of the poor and the malnourished resides in rural areas and depends on agriculture directly or indirectly, investments in public goods for agriculture and rural areas can be effective tools to achieve the multiple goals of reduced poverty, food security and armed conflict, including riots in early 2008 triggered by high food prices. Food policy can be an effective element of efforts to maintain stability. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

    DOI

  • The labour market impact of body weight in China: a semiparametric analysis

    Satoru Shimokawa

    APPLIED ECONOMICS   40 ( 8 ) 949 - 968  2008  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    While a positive wage effect of Body Mass Index (BMI) is widely observed in low-income developing countries, a negative wage effect of BMI is often observed in high-income developed countries. To fill the gap between these previous findings, we investigate the relationship between body weight and wages in transition economies. We focus on China, whose rapid economic growth of the 1990s was followed by a rapid increase in overweight and obesity while still experiencing significant food insecurity and underweight. we first use several parametric regression strategies to obtain a consistent estimate of the wage effects of weight. Second, we adopt a semiparametric partially linear model that allows for endogeneity of weight. Parametric regressions provide mixed results, and the sign and magnitude of their estimates are sensitive to the choice of samples and regression strategies. Semiparametric estimates provide evidence of a wage penalty for very heavy and thin persons among both men and women. The wage penalty is more significant among men than among women. Semiparametric results also indicate that parametric estimates can overstate and misrepresent the wage effects of weight for healthy weight persons due to their restrictive functional form assumptions.

    DOI

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Books and Other Publications

  • The Rising Cost of a Healthy Diet: Changing Relative Prices of Foods in High-income and Emerging Economies

    Steve Wiggins, Sharada Keats, Euna Han, Satoru Shimokawa, Joel Alberto Vargas Hernandez, Rafael Moreira Claro( Part: Contributor)

    Overseas Development Institute  2015

  • Rural Infrastructure and Agricultural Development.

    Pinstrup-Andersen, Per, Satoru Shimokawa. (Eds, F. Bourguignon, B. Pleskovic

    Rethinking Infrastructure for Development, The World Bank.  2007

Research Projects

  • Decision Making on Food Choice and Meal Construction and Requirements of Health Risk Communication

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2023.03
     

  • Sustainable Measures to Mitigate Consumers' Excessive Avoidance of Fukushima Foods - Behavioral Economics Approach

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2022.03
     

  • Development of risk communication model for food safety and requirements of profession

    Project Year :

    2015.04
    -
    2018.03
     

     View Summary

    The major achievement of this project has accumulated in the following areas. Regarding health effects of radioactive substances in food: (1) Structural models of public risk perception: a comparison of Japan, France and Korea. (2) Risk images and their sources in Japan and France. (3) Relationship between attitudes towards agricultural products from Fukushima, willingness to pay and response to scientific information. (4)①Changes in risk perception in panel data; ② Impacts of nuwmeracy on risk perception by scientific information. Regarding potential health risks: (5) Meal combination patterns. (6) Decision makings and eating norms on assembling meal. (7) Survey of higher education system in France and examination of requirements for profession of food safety

Presentations

Specific Research

  • Impact of Cultivated Land Conversion on Food Security in China

    2016  

     View Summary

    In China, the steep rise in cultivated land conversion, accompanied by a population increase, has provoked the debate about its impact on food security. Accordingly, the Chinese government emphasizes the importance of retaining cultivated land. However, it is still controversial if cultivated land conversion really threatens China’s food security. Thus, this study investigates the causal impact of cultivated land conversion on grain output in China by employing the instrumental variables estimation. Our estimation strategy exploits the facts that tax reform (a change in the enterprise tax-sharing scheme) and administrative decentralization in 2002 unintentionally influenced farmland conversion and that the magnitude of the unintended influences varied across local governments depending on how much their tax revenues had depended on the enterprise tax before the reform. Using data from 1999 to 2005, we found that land conveyance area significantly increased as local governments’ fiscal revenue decreased, and a decrease in farmland area caused by the land conveyance decreased grain output. Even after controlling for potential endogeneity bias, a 1% decrease in local government’s fiscal revenue increased land conveyance areas by 3.4%, and it decreased grain output by 0.10%. The findings may moderately support China’s recently imposed “redline” of 120 million hectares of cultivated land.

 

Syllabus

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