Updated on 2024/04/22

写真a

 
HUNG, Shao-Min
 
Affiliation
Affiliated organization, Waseda Institute for Advanced Study
Job title
Assistant Professor(non-tenure-track)

Research Experience

  • 2023
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Waseda Institute for Advanced Study   Assistant Professor

  • 2022
    -
    2023

    Waseda University   Faculty of Science and Engineering   Assistant Professor

  • 2018
    -
    2022

    California Institute of Technology   Biology and Biological Engineering   James Boswell Postdoctoral Researcher

  • 2010
    -
    2012

    National Taiwan University   Department of Psychology   Research Assistant

Education Background

  • 2012
    -
    2017

    Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School   Neuroscience and Behavioral Disorders  

  • 2006
    -
    2010

    National Taiwan University   Department of Psychology  

Professional Memberships

  • 2023
    -
    Now

    The Japan Neuroscience Society

  • 2015
    -
    Now

    Association of Scientific Studies of Consciousness

  • 2014
    -
    Now

    Vision Sciences Society

  • 2016
    -
    2018

    Society for Neuroscience

Research Areas

  • Cognitive and brain science / Experimental psychology / Cognitive science

Research Interests

  • Unconscious processing

  • Aging

  • Language

  • Attention

  • Consciousness

Awards

  • Young Scholar Oral Presentation Award

    2021   North America Taiwanese Professors’ Association  

  • Divisional Postdoctoral Fellowship

    2019   California Institute of Technology  

  • James Boswell Postdoctoral Fellowship

    2018   California Institute of Technology and Huntington Medical Research Institutes  

  • ARVO/VSS Research Fellowship Award

    2016   The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences Society  

  • 8th HOPE Meeting with Nobel Laureates

    2016   Japan Society for the Promotion of Science  

  • Study Abroad Scholarship

    2014   Ministry of Education, Taiwan  

  • Best Oral Presentation. 1st Runner-up

    2014   Duke-NUS Early Career Scientists Association  

  • Lung-Shan Temple Scholarship (Academic Distinction)

    2009   Lung-Shan Temple  

  • Presidential Award (top 5% students)

    2009   National Taiwan University  

▼display all

Media Coverage

  • Connecting the dots when we can’t see them: Unconscious learning of probability

    Newspaper, magazine

    Psychonomic Society Featured Content  

    2023.09

  • A Behavioral Test to Detect Early Risk of Alzheimer’s

    Newspaper, magazine

    Author: Other  

    Caltech Office of Strategic Communications  

    2022.09

  • Words Can Sound “Round” or “Sharp” Without Us Realizing It

    Newspaper, magazine

    Author: Other  

    Association for Psychological Science  

    2017.02

 

Papers

  • Practice makes imperfect: stronger implicit interference with practice in individuals at high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease

    Shao-Min Hung, Sara W. Adams, Cathleen Molloy, Daw-An Wu, Shinsuke Shimojo, Xianghong Arakaki

    GeroScience    2023.10

     View Summary

    Abstract

    Early screening to determine patient risk of developing Alzheimer’s will allow better interventions and planning but necessitates accessible methods such as behavioral biomarkers. Previously, we showed that cognitively healthy older individuals whose cerebrospinal fluid amyloid/tau ratio indicates high risk of cognitive decline experienced implicit interference during a high-effort task, signaling early changes in attention. To further investigate attention’s effect on implicit interference, we analyzed two experiments completed sequentially by the same high- and low-risk individuals. We hypothesized that if attention modulates interference, practice would affect the influence of implicit distractors. Indeed, while both groups experienced a strong practice effect, the association between practice and interference effects diverged between groups: stronger practice effects correlated with more implicit interference in high-risk participants, but less interference in low-risk individuals. Furthermore, low-risk individuals showed a positive correlation between implicit interference and EEG low-range alpha event-related desynchronization when switching from high- to low-load tasks. This suggests that lower attention on the task was correlated with stronger interference, a typical phenomenon in the younger population. These results demonstrate how attention impacts implicit interference and highlight early differences in perception between high- and low-risk individuals.

    DOI

  • Extracting probability in the absence of visual awareness.

    Shao-Min Hung, Daw-An Wu, Leslie Escobar, Po-Jang Hsieh, Shinsuke Shimojo

    Cognitive, affective & behavioral neuroscience    2023.01  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Extracting statistical regularities from the environment is crucial for survival. It allows us to learn cues for where and when future events will occur. Can we learn these associations even when the cues are not consciously perceived? Can these unconscious processes integrate information over long periods of time? We show that human visual system can track the probability of location contingency between an unconscious prime and a conscious target over a period of time of minutes. In a series of psychophysical experiments, we adopted an exogenous priming paradigm and manipulated the location contingency between a masked prime and a visible target (i.e., how likely the prime location predicted the target location). The prime's invisibility was verified both subjectively and objectively. Although the participants were unaware of both the existence of the prime and the prime-target contingency, our results showed that the probability of location contingency was tracked and manifested in the subsequent priming effect. When participants were first entrained into the fully predictive prime-target probability, they exhibited faster responses to the more predictive location. On the contrary, when no contingency existed between the prime and target initially, participants later showed faster responses to the less predictive location. These results were replicated in two more experiments with increased statistical power and a fine-grained delineation of prime awareness. Together, we report that the human visual system is capable of tracking unconscious probability over a period of time, demonstrating how implicit and uncertain regularity guides behavior.

    DOI PubMed

  • Implicit semantics gates visual awareness

    Shao-Min Hung

       2023.01

    DOI

  • Detecting spontaneous deception in the brain.

    Yen-Ju Feng, Shao-Min Hung, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Human brain mapping   43 ( 10 ) 3257 - 3269  2022.07  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Deception detection can be of great value during the juristic investigation. Although the neural signatures of deception have been widely documented, most prior studies were biased by difficulty levels. That is, deceptive behavior typically required more effort, making deception detection possibly effort detection. Furthermore, no study has examined the generalizability across instructed and spontaneous responses and across participants. To explore these issues, we used a dual-task paradigm, where the difficulty level was balanced between truth-telling and lying, and the instructed and spontaneous truth-telling and lying were collected independently. Using Multivoxel pattern analysis, we were able to decode truth-telling versus lying with a balanced difficulty level. Results showed that the angular gyrus (AG), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and postcentral gyrus could differentiate lying from truth-telling. Critically, linear classifiers trained to distinguish instructed truthful and deceptive responses could correctly differentiate spontaneous truthful and deceptive responses in AG and IFG with above-chance accuracy. In addition, with a leave-one-participant-out analysis, multivoxel neural patterns from AG could classify if the left-out participant was lying or not in a trial. These results indicate the commonality of neural responses subserved instructed and spontaneous deceptive behavior as well as the feasibility of cross-participant deception validation.

    DOI PubMed

  • Alpha desynchronization during Stroop test unmasks cognitively healthy individuals with abnormal CSF Amyloid/Tau.

    Xianghong Arakaki, Shao-Min Hung, Roger Rochart, Alfred N Fonteh, Michael G Harrington

    Neurobiology of aging   112   87 - 101  2022.04  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Synaptic dysfunctions precede cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease by decades, affect executive functions, and can be detected by quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG). We used quantitative electroencephalography combined with Stroop testing to identify changes of inhibitory controls in cognitively healthy individuals with an abnormal versus normal ratio of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid/total-tau. We studied two groups of participants (60-94 years) with either normal (CH-NAT or controls, n = 20) or abnormal (CH-PAT, n = 21) CSF amyloid/tau ratio. We compared: alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD), alpha spectral entropy (SE), and their relationships with estimated cognitive reserve. CH-PATs had more negative occipital alpha ERD, and higher frontal and occipital alpha SE during low load congruent trials, indicating hyperactivity. CH-PATs demonstrated fewer frontal SE changes with higher load, incongruent Stroop testing. Correlations of alpha ERD with estimated cognitive reserve were significant in CH-PATs but not in CH-NATs. These results suggested compensatory hyperactivity in CH-PATs compared to CH-NATs. We did not find differences in alpha ERD comparisons with individual CSF amyloid(A), p-tau(T), total-tau(N) biomarkers.

    DOI PubMed

  • Mind wandering in sensory cortices

    Shao-Min Hung, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Neuroimage: Reports   2 ( 1 ) 100073 - 100073  2022.03

    DOI

  • Tracking probability unconsciously

    Shao-Min Hung, Daw-an Wu, Po-Jang Hsieh, Shinsuke Shimojo

       2022.02

    DOI

  • Stronger implicit interference in cognitively healthy older participants with higher risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Shao-Min Hung, Daw-An Wu, Shinsuke Shimojo, Xianghong Arakaki

    Alzheimer's & dementia (Amsterdam, Netherlands)   14 ( 1 ) e12340  2022  [International journal]

     View Summary

    INTRODUCTION: Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid amyloid beta (Aβ)42 and tau levels have been revealed decades before symptoms onset in Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, the examination is usually invasive and inaccessible to most people. We thus aimed to develop a non-invasive behavioral test that targets early potential cognitive changes to gauge cognitive decline. Specifically, we hypothesized that older cognitive healthy participants would exhibit comparable performance when the task was explicit and relied on conscious cognition. However, when the task was implicit, the performance of participants at high and low risks for AD would bifurcate. That is, early changes in unconscious cognition could be linked to cognitive health. METHODS: We measured implicit interference elicited by an imperceptible distractor in cognitively healthy elderly participants with normal (low risk) and pathological (high risk) Aβ42/total tau ratio. Participants were required to perform a Stroop task (word-naming or color-naming on an ink-semantics inconsistent word) with a visually masked distractor presented prior to the target task. RESULTS: We found that, under a high-effort task (i.e., color-naming in the Stroop task), high-risk participants suffered interference when the imperceptible distractor and the subsequent target were incongruent in the responses they triggered. Their reaction times were slowed down by approximately 4%. This implicit interference was not found in the low-risk participants. DISCUSSION: These findings indicate that weakened inhibition of distracting implicit information can be a potential behavioral biomarker of early identification of AD pathology. Our study thus offers a new experimental paradigm to reveal early pathological aging by assessing how individuals respond to subperceptual threshold visual stimuli.

    DOI PubMed

  • Task switching reveals abnormal brain-heart electrophysiological signatures in cognitively healthy individuals with abnormal CSF amyloid/tau, a pilot study.

    Rebecca Johnson Arechavala, Roger Rochart, Robert A Kloner, Anqi Liu, Daw-An Wu, Shao-Min Hung, Shinsuke Shimojo, Alfred N Fonteh, Michael T Kleinman, Michael G Harrington, Xianghong Arakaki

    International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology   170   102 - 111  2021.12  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha oscillations have been related to heart rate variability (HRV) and both change in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We explored if task switching reveals altered alpha power and HRV in cognitively healthy individuals with AD pathology in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and whether HRV improves the AD pathology classification by alpha power alone. We compared low and high alpha event-related desynchronization (ERD) and HRV parameters during task switch testing between two groups of cognitively healthy participants classified by CSF amyloid/tau ratio: normal (CH-NAT, n = 19) or pathological (CH-PAT, n = 27). For the task switching paradigm, participants were required to name the color or word for each colored word stimulus, with two sequential stimuli per trial. Trials include color (cC) or word (wW) repeats with low load repeating, and word (cW) or color switch (wC) for high load switching. HRV was assessed for RR interval, standard deviation of RR-intervals (SDNN) and root mean squared successive differences (RMSSD) in time domain, and low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), and LF/HF ratio in frequency domain. Results showed that CH-PATs compared to CH-NATs presented: 1) increased (less negative) low alpha ERD during low load repeat trials and lower word switch cost (low alpha: p = 0.008, Cohen's d = -0.83, 95% confidence interval -1.44 to -0.22, and high alpha: p = 0.019, Cohen's d = -0.73, 95% confidence interval -1.34 to -0.13); 2) decreasing HRV from rest to task, suggesting hyper-activated sympatho-vagal responses. 3) CH-PATs classification by alpha ERD was improved by supplementing HRV signatures, supporting a potentially compromised brain-heart interoceptive regulation in CH-PATs. Further experiments are needed to validate these findings for clinical significance.

    DOI PubMed

  • Subliminal temporal integration of linguistic information under discontinuous flash suppression.

    Shao-Min Hung, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Journal of vision   21 ( 5 ) 27 - 27  2021.05  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Whether unconscious complex visual information integration occurs over time remains largely unknown and highly controversial. Previous studies have tended to use a combination of strong masking or suppression and a weak stimulus signal (e.g., low luminance), resulting in a low signal-to-noise ratio during unconscious stimulus presentation. To lengthen the stimulus exposure, we introduced intermittent presentation into interocular suppression. This discontinuous suppression allowed us to insert a word during each suppression period and deliver multiple words over time unconsciously. We found that, after participants received the subliminal context, they responded faster to a syntactically incongruent target word in a lexical decision task. We later replicated the finding in a separate experiment where participants exhibited chance performance on locating the subliminal context. These results confirmed that the sentential context was both subjectively and objectively subliminal. Critically, the effect disappeared when the context was disrupted by presenting only partial sentences or sentences with a reversed word order. These control experiments showed that the effect was not merely driven by word-word association but instead required integration over multiple words in the correct order. These findings support the possibility of unconscious high-level, complex information integration.

    DOI PubMed

  • Task-induced attention load guides and gates unconscious semantic interference.

    Shao-Min Hung, Daw-An Wu, Shinsuke Shimojo

    Nature communications   11 ( 1 ) 2088 - 2088  2020.04  [International journal]

     View Summary

    The tight relationship between attention and conscious perception has been extensively researched in the past decades. However, whether attentional modulation extended to unconscious processes remained largely unknown, particularly when it came to abstract and high-level processing. Here we use a double Stroop paradigm to demonstrate that attention load gates unconscious semantic processing. We find that word and color incongruencies between a subliminal prime and a supraliminal target cause slower responses to non-Stroop target words-but only if the task is to name the target word (low-load task), and not if the task is to name the target's color (high-load task). The task load hypothesis is confirmed by showing that the word-induced incongruence effect can be detected in the color-naming task, but only in the late, practiced trials. We further replicate this task-induced attentional modulation phenomenon in separate experiments with colorless words (word-only) and words with semantic relationship but no orthographic similarities (semantics-only).

    DOI PubMed

  • Can a Word Sound Like a Shape Before You Have Seen It? Sound-Shape Mapping Prior to Conscious Awareness.

    Shao-Min Hung, Suzy J Styles, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Psychological science   28 ( 3 ) 263 - 275  2017.03  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Nonarbitrary mappings between sound and shape (i.e., the bouba-kiki effect) have been shown across different cultures and early in development; however, the level of processing at which this effect arises remains unclear. Here we show that the mapping occurs prior to conscious awareness of the visual stimuli. Under continuous flash suppression, congruent stimuli (e.g., "kiki" inside an angular shape) broke through to conscious awareness faster than incongruent stimuli. This was true even when we trained people to pair unfamiliar letters with auditory word forms, a result showing that the effect was driven by the phonology, not the visual features, of the letters. Furthermore, visibility thresholds of the shapes decreased when they were preceded by a congruent auditory word form in a masking paradigm. Taken together, our results suggest that sound-shape mapping can occur automatically prior to conscious awareness of visual shapes, and that sensory congruence facilitates conscious awareness of a stimulus being present.

    DOI PubMed

  • Cerebral neural correlates of differential melanopic photic stimulation in humans.

    Shao-Min Hung, Dan Milea, Annadata Venkata Rukmini, Raymond P Najjar, Joo Huang Tan, Françoise Viénot, Marie Dubail, Sharon Lee Choon Tow, Tin Aung, Joshua J Gooley, Po-Jang Hsieh

    NeuroImage   146   763 - 769  2017.02  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Photic stimulation of rods, cones and intrinsically photosensitive melanopsin-containing retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediates non-visual light responses, including entrainment of circadian rhythms and pupillary light reflex. Unlike visual responses to photic stimulation, the cerebral correlates of non-visual light responses in humans remains elusive. In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 14 healthy young participants, to localize cerebral regions which are differentially activated by metameric light that gave rise to different levels of melanopic excitation. Mean blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses disclosed bilateral activation of the frontal eye fields during exposure to light geared towards melanopsin. Furthermore, multivariate pattern analyses showed distinct bilateral pattern activity in the inferior temporal gyri and the caudate nuclei. Taken together, our findings suggest that melanopsin-based photoreception activates a cerebral network including frontal regions, classically involved in attention and ocular motor responses.

    DOI PubMed

  • Unconscious processing of facial attractiveness: invisible attractive faces orient visual attention.

    Shao-Min Hung, Chih-Hsuan Nieh, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Scientific reports   6   37117 - 37117  2016.11  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Past research has proven human's extraordinary ability to extract information from a face in the blink of an eye, including its emotion, gaze direction, and attractiveness. However, it remains elusive whether facial attractiveness can be processed and influences our behaviors in the complete absence of conscious awareness. Here we demonstrate unconscious processing of facial attractiveness with three distinct approaches. In Experiment 1, the time taken for faces to break interocular suppression was measured. The results showed that attractive faces enjoyed the privilege of breaking suppression and reaching consciousness earlier. In Experiment 2, we further showed that attractive faces had lower visibility thresholds, again suggesting that facial attractiveness could be processed more easily to reach consciousness. Crucially, in Experiment 3, a significant decrease of accuracy on an orientation discrimination task subsequent to an invisible attractive face showed that attractive faces, albeit suppressed and invisible, still exerted an effect by orienting attention. Taken together, for the first time, we show that facial attractiveness can be processed in the complete absence of consciousness, and an unconscious attractive face is still capable of directing our attention.

    DOI PubMed

  • Syntactic processing in the absence of awareness and semantics.

    Shao-Min Hung, Po-Jang Hsieh

    Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance   41 ( 5 ) 1376 - 1384  2015.10  [International journal]

     View Summary

    The classical view that multistep rule-based operations require consciousness has recently been challenged by findings that both multiword semantic processing and multistep arithmetic equations can be processed unconsciously. It remains unclear, however, whether pure rule-based cognitive processes can occur unconsciously in the absence of semantics. Here, after presenting 2 words consciously, we suppressed the third with continuous flash suppression. First, we showed that the third word in the subject-verb-verb format (syntactically incongruent) broke suppression significantly faster than the third word in the subject-verb-object format (syntactically congruent). Crucially, the same effect was observed even with sentences composed of pseudowords (pseudo subject-verb-adjective vs. pseudo subject-verb-object) without any semantic information. This is the first study to show that syntactic congruency can be processed unconsciously in the complete absence of semantics. Our findings illustrate how abstract rule-based processing (e.g., syntactic categories) can occur in the absence of visual awareness, even when deprived of semantics.

    DOI PubMed

  • The role of inferior frontal gyrus in processing Chinese classifiers.

    Tai-Li Chou, Shu-Hui Lee, Shao-Min Hung, Hsuan-Chih Chen

    Neuropsychologia   50 ( 7 ) 1408 - 15  2012.06  [International journal]

     View Summary

    The Chinese classifier system classifies nouns and builds a relation between classifiers and their corresponding nouns. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study examined brain activation of Chinese classifiers during reading comprehension. Thirty-four participants read and performed semantic congruency judgments on congruent, inside-classifier (IC) violated, and outside-classifier (OC) violated sentences. The IC and OC violations were created by changing the correct classifier to an inappropriate classifier and a non-classifier, respectively. The comparison of the IC violation vs. the congruent condition produced greater activation in the mid-ventral region (BA 45) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), suggesting an increased demand on semantic processing. Contrasting different subtypes of IC violation produced greater activation in the right IFG (BAs 45 and 47), indicating that processing mass/count classifiers involves distinct brain activations. The OC violation produced greater activation in the left IFG (BAs 45 and 44), suggesting both semantic and syntactic processing. These results indicate that different parts of the IFG contribute to syntactic and semantic processing of classifier phrases in reading Chinese for comprehension.

    DOI PubMed

▼display all

Presentations

  • Attention gates unconscious processes, psychophysics, fMRI, and more evidence from aging science.

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Consciousness Research Network 

    Presentation date: 2023.08

  • Task load modulates subliminal visual signals in the early visual cortex.

    Hung, S. -M, Feng, Y. -J, Hsieh, P. -J, Watanabe, K

    Japan Neuroscience Society 

    Presentation date: 2023.08

  • Semantics induces invisibility in an audiovisual illusion.

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Hsieh, P. -J, Shimojo, S, Watanabe, K

    Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness (ASSC) 

    Presentation date: 2023.06

  • Practice makes imperfect: Positive correlation between practice and implicit distraction in asymptomatic individuals with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Shimojo, S, Arakaki, X

    Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 

    Presentation date: 2022.08

  • Tracking contingency unconsciously

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Hsieh, P. -J, Shimojo, S

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2022.05

  • Probing the limits of unconscious processing

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Tel-Aviv University 

    Presentation date: 2021.07

  • Tracking contingency unconsciously. Short talk at the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Shimojo, S

    Association of Scientific Studies of Consciousness 

    Presentation date: 2021.06

  • Unconscious processing: single-unit and automatic?

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    National Tsing Hua University 

    Presentation date: 2021.04

  • Fundamental principles of unconscious processing

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    National Chiao Tung University 

    Presentation date: 2020.11

  • Implicit response incompatibility slowed down asymptomatic individuals with Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Harrington, M. G, Shimojo, S, Arakaki, X

    Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 

    Presentation date: 2020.07

  • Heart rate variability changes during task shifting testing in pre-symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease

    Arechavala, R. J, Kloner, R, Hung, S. -M, Harrington, M. G, Arakaki, X, Kleinman, M. T

    Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 

    Presentation date: 2020.07

  • Unconscious processing: from photoreceptors to language faculty

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    University of Nevada Reno 

    Presentation date: 2019.10

  • Language processing outside the realm of consciousness

    Hung, S. -M

    Asia Pacific Conference on Vision 

    Presentation date: 2019.07

  • The attentional requirements of unconscious processes

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Shimojo, S

    Association of Scientific Studies of Consciousness 

    Presentation date: 2019.07

  • The role of color preference under interocular suppression

    Zhai, A, Hung, S. -M, Shimojo, S

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2019.05

  • The automatic and non-automatic aspects of unconscious visual processing

    Hung, S. -M, Wu, D. -A, Shimojo, S

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2019.05

  • Unconscious information integration

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Tohoku University 

    Presentation date: 2019.02

  • Unconscious processing: from photoreceptors to language faculty

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    National Taiwan University 

    Presentation date: 2018.10

  • Dis-continuous flash suppression: A novel interocular suppression reveals temporal integration of subliminal linguistic information

    Hung, S. -M, Hsieh, P. -J

    Association of Scientific Studies of Consciousness 

    Presentation date: 2018.06

  • Can we follow rules of unseen stimuli?

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Huntington Medical Research Institutes 

    Presentation date: 2018.05

  • Dis-continuous flash suppression: A novel masking technique reveals temporal integration of subliminal linguistic information

    Hung, S. -M, Hsieh, P. -J

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2018.05

  • Unconscious sound-shape mapping: A word can sound like a shape before you have seen it

    Hung, S. -M, Styles, S, Hsieh, P. -J

    Consciousness Research Network 

    Presentation date: 2017.11

  • Words Can Sound “Round” or “Sharp” Without Us Realizing It

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School 

    Presentation date: 2017.08

  • There is no hidden beauty: unconscious processing of facial attractiveness

    Hung, S. -M

    Asia Pacific Conference on Vision 

    Presentation date: 2017.07

  • Unconsciously attracted: invisible attractive faces orient visual attention

    Hung, S. -M, Nieh, C. -H, Hsieh, P. -J

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2017.05

  • Unconscious information processing

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    California Institute of Technology 

    Presentation date: 2016.11

  • Mind wandering recruits sensory cortices

    Hung, S. -M, Hsieh, P. -J

    Object Perception, Attention & Memory (OPAM) 

    Presentation date: 2016.11

  • Mind wandering in sensory cortices

    Hung, S. -M, Hsieh, P. -J

    Society for Neuroscience 

    Presentation date: 2016.11

  • Out of sight, not out of mind

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Duke University 

    Presentation date: 2016.05

  • Brain mapping reveals potential functions of ipRGCs in modulating eye movements

    Hung, S. -M, Milea, D, Viénot, F, Tan, J. H, Rukmini, D. V, Dubail, M., Tow, S. L. C, Aung, T, Gooley, J. J, Hsieh, P. -J

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2016.05

  • Can a word sound sharp before you have seen it? Sound- shape mapping prior to conscious awareness

    Hsieh, P. -J, Hung, S. -M, Styles, S

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2016.05

  • To see or not to see, that is not the question

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    University of Tokyo 

    Presentation date: 2016.03

  • Unconscious information processing

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation 

    Presentation date: 2016.03

  • Unconscious information processing

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    National Taiwan University 

    Presentation date: 2016.01

  • Pre-conscious Automaticity of Sound-shape Mapping

    Hung, S. -M, Styles, S, Hsieh, P. -J

    International Symposium on Sound and Interactivity 

    Presentation date: 2015.08

  • Automaticity of Sound-shape Mapping

    Hung, S. -M, Styles, S, Hsieh, P. -J

    Association of Scientific Studies of Consciousness 

    Presentation date: 2015.07

  • Unconscious syntactic processing in the absence of semantics

    Hung, S. -M  [Invited]

    Duke-National University of Singapore Medical School 

    Presentation date: 2014.05

  • Unconscious Syntactic Processing in the Absence of Semantics

    Hung, S. -M, Hsieh, P. -J

    Vision Sciences Society 

    Presentation date: 2014.05

▼display all

Research Projects

  • Optimizing unconscious signals through attentional control

    Templeton World Charity Foundation 

    Project Year :

    2022
    -
    2023
     

    Hung, S. -M

Misc

  • Human Cognition and Hyper Intelligence

    D. Frank Hsu, Mohammad Shehata, Shao-Min Hung, Shinsuke Shimojo, Ryota Kanai, Christina Schweikert, Michael W. David, Vincenzo Piuri, Jianhua Ma

    2021 IEEE Intl Conf on Dependable, Autonomic and Secure Computing, Intl Conf on Pervasive Intelligence and Computing, Intl Conf on Cloud and Big Data Computing, Intl Conf on Cyber Science and Technology Congress (DASC/PiCom/CBDCom/CyberSciTech)    2021.10

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (international conference proceedings)  

    DOI

 

Syllabus

Teaching Experience

  • Consciousness seminar (Guest lecturer)

    National Taiwan University  

    2021.09
    -
    2022.01
     

  • CNS 176: Cognition (Guest lecturer)

    California Institute of Technology  

    2021.02
    -
    2021.05
     

  • CNS 186: Vision: From Computational Theory to Neuronal Mechanisms (TA)

    California Institute of Technology  

    2019.10
    -
    2020.01
     

 

Social Activities

  • Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Representative

    California Institute of Technology 

    2021
    -
    2022

Academic Activities

  • Co-organizer

    Academic society, research group, etc.

    2022.07
    -
    2023.08

Sub-affiliation

  • Faculty of Science and Engineering   School of Fundamental Science and Engineering

Internal Special Research Projects

  • Optimizing unconscious signals through attentional control

    2023   Shinsuke Shimojo, Xianghong Arakaki

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    Together with a team at Caltech and HMRI, we identified that implicit interference could be associated with early cognitive decline in older individuals with a higher risk of developing Alzheimer's. Specifically, we found that attentional regulation of the subliminal sensory information was key. That is, older individuals at higher risk suffered stronger interference after practice, when more attention should be available. On the contrary, older individuals at lower risk exhibited the opposite pattern. The results extended our original theoretical hypothesis to real-world implications. This study was published recently on GeroScience:Hung, S. -M., Adams, S. W., Molloy, C., Wu, D. A., Shimojo, S., & Arakaki, X. (2024) Practice makes imperfect: stronger implicit interference with practice in individuals at high risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. GeroScience, 46, 2777–2786. Caltech News also featured our findings:https://www.caltech.edu/about/news/attention-focus-and-a-high-risk-of-alzheimers