Updated on 2022/06/30

写真a

 
HIRATA, Kosuke
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Sport Sciences, School of Sport and Sciences
Job title
Assistant Professor(without tenure)

Degree

  • 2009.03   早稲田大学 スポーツ科学部   学士(スポーツ科学)

  • 2011.03   早稲田大学大学院 スポーツ科学研究科   修士(スポーツ科学)

  • 2018.03   鹿屋体育大学大学院 体育学研究科   博士(体育学)

 

Research Areas

  • Sports sciences   バイオメカニクス,神経筋生理学,トレーニング科学

Papers

  • Membrane capacitance and characteristic frequency are associated with contractile properties of skeletal muscle

    Yosuke Yamada, Kosuke Hirata, Natsuki Iida, Akihiro Kanda, Mikio Shoji, Tsukasa Yoshida, Motohiko Myachi, Ryota Akagi

    Medical Engineering & Physics    2022.06  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

  • Trade-off between maximal power output and fatigue resistance of the knee extensors for older men

    Ryota Akagi, Yuta Nomura, Chiho Kawashima, Mari Ito, Kosuke Oba, Yuma Tsuchiya, Geoffrey A. Power, Kosuke Hirata

    Journal of Aging and Physical Activity    2022.04  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Last author

    DOI

  • Association of age-related decrease in intracellular-to-total water ratio with that in explosive strength of the plantar flexors: a cross-sectional study

    Kosuke Hirata, Natsuki Iida, Akihiro Kanda, Mikio Shoji, Tsukasa Yoshida, Yosuke Yamada, Ryota Akagi

    Journal of Physiological Anthropology   41   10  2022.03  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

    DOI

  • Genetic polymorphisms related to muscular strength and flexibility are associated with artistic gymnastic performance in the Japanese population

    Hiroshi Kumagai, Tomoko Kaneko, Yuko Shintake, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Hiroyuki Tomita, Makoto Fukuo, Wataru Kawai, Mutsumi Harada, Naoki Kikuchi, Nobuhiro Kamiya, Kosuke Hirata, Hirofumi Zempo, Seiji Maeda, Naokazu Miyamoto, Noriyuki Fuku

    European Journal of Sport Science    2022  [Refereed]

  • Can a short-term daily oral administration of propolis improve muscle fatigue and recovery?

    Yuma Tsuchiya, Naoya Hirata, Kosuke Oba, Motoya Ikeguchi, Takashi Asama, Naomi Osakabe, Kosuke Hirata, Ryota Akagi

    International Journal of Sports Medicine    2022  [Refereed]

  • Individual differences in knee extensor fatigue induced by sustained mid-level contraction

    Hirata N, Sato S, Tanimoto H, Imaizumi N, Hirata K, Akagi R

    The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine   10 ( 5 ) 283 - 286  2021.09  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Female Athletes Genetically Susceptible to Fatigue Fracture Are Resistant to Muscle Injury: Potential Role of COL1A1 Variant

    ERI MIYAMOTO-MIKAMI, HIROSHI KUMAGAI, KUMPEI TANISAWA, YUKI TAGA, KOSUKE HIRATA, NAOKI KIKUCHI, NOBUHIRO KAMIYA, RYOKO KAWAKAMI, TAISHI MIDORIKAWA, TAKUJI KAWAMURA, RYO KAKIGI, TOSHIHARU NATSUME, HIROFUMI ZEMPO, KOYA SUZUKI, YOSHIMITSU KOHMURA, KAZUNORI MIZUNO, SUGURU TORII, SHIZUO SAKAMOTO, KOICHIRO OKA, MITSURU HIGUCHI, HISASHI NAITO, NAOKAZU MIYAMOTO, NORIYUKI FUKU

    Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise   53 ( 9 ) 1855 - 1864  2021.09  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    PURPOSE: We aimed to investigate the hypothesis that type I collagen plays a role in increasing bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle stiffness, leading to low and high risks of fatigue fracture and muscle injury, respectively, in athletes. As a potential mechanism, we focused on the effect of the type I collagen alpha 1 chain gene (COL1A1) variant associated with transcriptional activity on bone and skeletal muscle properties. METHODS: The association between COL1A1 rs1107946 and fatigue fracture/muscle injury was evaluated in Japanese athletes. Effects of the polymorphism on tissue properties (BMD and muscle stiffness) and type I collagen α1/α2 chain ratios in muscles were examined in Japanese nonathletes. RESULTS: The C-allele carrier frequency was greater in female athletes with fatigue fracture than in those without (odds ratio = 2.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.17-5.77) and lower in female athletes with muscle injury than in those without (odds ratio = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.24-0.91). Prospective validation analysis confirmed that in female athletes, muscle injury was less frequent in C-allele carriers than in AA genotype carriers (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.08-0.96). Among female nonathletes, the C-allele of rs1107946 was associated with lower BMD and lower muscle stiffness. Muscle biopsy revealed that C-allele carriers tended to have a larger type I collagen α1/α2 chain ratio than AA genotype carriers (2.24 vs 2.05, P = 0.056), suggesting a higher proportion of type I collagen α1 homotrimers. CONCLUSION: The COL1A1 rs1107946 polymorphism exerts antagonistic effects on fatigue fracture and muscle injury among female athletes by altering the properties of these tissues, potentially owing to increased levels of type I collagen α1 chain homotrimers.

    DOI PubMed

  • Site‐specific features of active muscle stiffness and proximal aponeurosis strain in biceps femoris long head

    Naokazu Miyamoto, Kosuke Hirata

    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports   31 ( 8 ) 1666 - 1673  2021.08  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Last author

    DOI

  • Relationship between resting medial gastrocnemius stiffness and drop jump performance

    Ryosuke Ando, Shinya Sato, Naoya Hirata, Hiroki Tanimoto, Naoto Imaizumi, Yasuhiro Suzuki, Kosuke Hirata, Ryota Akagi

    Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology   58   102549 - 102549  2021.06  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Although the influence of the series elastic element of the muscle-tendon unit on jump performance has been investigated, the corresponding effect of the parallel elastic element remains unclear. This study examined the relationship between the resting calf muscle stiffness and drop jump performance. Twenty-four healthy men participated in this study. The shear moduli of the medial gastrocnemius and the soleus were measured at rest as an index of muscle stiffness using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The participants performed drop jumps from a 15 cm high box. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient was used to examine the relationships between shear moduli of the muscles and drop jump performance. The medial gastrocnemius shear modulus showed a significant correlation with the drop jump index (jump height/contact time) (r = 0.414, P = 0.044) and jump height (r = 0.411, P = 0.046), but not with contact time (P > 0.05). The soleus shear modulus did not correlate with these jump parameters (P > 0.05). These results suggest that the resting medial gastrocnemius stiffness can be considered as one of the factors that influence drop jump performance. Therefore, increase in resting muscle stiffness should enhance explosive athletic performance in training regimens.

    DOI PubMed

  • Association between medial gastrocnemius muscle-tendon unit architecture and ankle dorsiflexion range of motion with and without consideration of slack angle

    Kosuke Hirata, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Naokazu Miyamoto

    PLOS ONE   16 ( 3 ) e0248125 - e0248125  2021.03  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    Joint flexibility is theoretically considered to associate with muscle-tendon unit (MTU) architecture. However, this potential association has not been experimentally demonstrated in humans in vivo. We aimed to identify whether and how MTU architectural parameters are associated with joint range of motion (RoM), with a special emphasis on slack angle. The fascicle length, pennation angle, tendinous tissue length, MTU length, and shear modulus of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) were assessed during passive ankle dorsiflexion using ultrasound shear wave elastography in 17 healthy males. During passive dorsiflexion task, the ankle joint was rotated from 40° plantar flexion to the maximal dorsiflexion joint angle at which each subject started experiencing pain. From the ankle joint angle-shear modulus relationship, the angle at which shear modulus began to rise (slack angle) was calculated. Two dorsiflexion RoMs were determined as follows; 1) range from the anatomical position to maximal angle (RoManat-max) and 2) range from the MG slack angle to maximal angle (RoMslack-max). The MTU architectural parameters were analyzed at the anatomical position and MG slack angle. The resolved fascicle length (fascicle length × cosine of pennation angle) and ratios of resolved fascicle or tendinous tissue length to MTU length measured at the MG slack angle significantly correlated with the RoMslack-max(r = 0.491, 0.506, and -0.506, respectively). Any MTU architectural parameters assessed at the anatomical position did not correlate with RoManat-maxor RoMslack-max. These results indicate that MTUs with long fascicle and short tendinous tissue are advantageous for joint flexibility. However, this association cannot be found unless MTU architecture and joint RoM are assessed with consideration of muscle slack.

    DOI

  • Relationship between drop jump training–induced changes in passive plantar flexor stiffness and explosive performance

    Ryosuke Ando, Shinya Sato, Naoya Hirata, Hiroki Tanimoto, Naoto Imaizumi, Yasuhiro Suzuki, Kosuke Hirata, Ryota Akagi

    Frontiers in Physiology    2021  [Refereed]

  • Muscle damage indicated by maximal voluntary contraction strength changes from immediately to 1 day after eccentric exercise of the knee extensors

    Shoji M, Ema R, Nosaka K, Kanda A, Hirata K, Akagi R

    Frontiers in Physiology    2021  [Refereed]

  • Carbon dioxide hydrate as a recovery tool after fatigue of the plantar flexors

    Kosuke Hirata, Hiroki Tanimoto, Shinya Sato, Naoya Hirata, Naoto Imaizumi, Yoshihiko Sugihara, Hiroyuki Murakami, Ryota Akagi

    Journal of Biomechanics   108   109900 - 109900  2020.07  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

    DOI

  • Can static stretching reduce stiffness of the triceps surae in older men?

    Hirata K, Yamadera R, Akagi R

    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   52 ( 3 ) 673 - 679  2020.03  [Refereed]  [International journal]

    Authorship:Lead author, Corresponding author

     View Summary

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate reductions of muscle stiffness induced by static stretching in older and younger men. METHODS: Twenty older (62-83 yr) and 20 younger (21-24 yr) men were recruited. Ankle dorsiflexion static stretching was consisted of 90 s × 5 repetitions. Before and after the stretching, the dorsiflexion range of motion (RoM), passive plantar flexion torque, and shear modulus (an index of stiffness) of the medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemius and the soleus were measured. RESULTS: RoM, passive torque, and shear modulus of the triceps surae measured at the maximal dorsiflexion angle before stretching were significantly lower for the older group than the younger group. This suggests a weak stretching intensity for older compared with younger people. The stretching significantly improved RoM for both groups. For the older group, a significant reduction in passive torque was only observed at a 15° dorsiflexion angle, and the shear modulus was significantly decreased only for the distal region of MG. For the younger group, passive torque was significantly reduced for the entire RoM, and a significant decrease in shear modulus was found for the central and distal regions of MG and lateral gastrocnemius. A significant correlation between the muscle shear modulus measured at the maximal dorsiflexion angle before stretching and a stretching-induced decrease in muscle shear modulus was observed for older and younger participants. This indicates that the higher stretching intensity can reduce more muscle stiffness. CONCLUSION: Static stretching can reduce muscle stiffness regardless of age, although the stretching effect on muscle stiffness was limited for older people. This might be due to a lower stretching intensity for older than younger people.

    DOI PubMed

  • Active recovery has a positive and acute effect on recovery from fatigue induced by repeated maximal voluntary contractions of the plantar flexors

    Akagi R, Imaizumi N, Sato S, Hirata N, Tanimoto H, Hirata K

    Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology   50   102384 - 102384  2020.02  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    This study investigated the acute effect of active recovery (AR) following fatigue induced by 80 three-second maximal voluntary isometric plantar flexion contractions (MVICs) in 12 young men. AR consisted of a total of 180 voluntary isometric ramp contractions of the plantar flexors (0.75-s contraction/relaxation) targeting 10% of MVIC torque. MVIC torque, voluntary activation and root mean square values of electromyographic signals for the triceps surae normalized by each peak-to-peak amplitude of compound motor action potential were determined before, and immediately, 10, 20 and 30 min after the fatiguing task. Evoked torques were similarly assessed except for immediately after it. The AR and passive recovery were randomly performed on two days by each participant between 5 min and 10 min after the fatiguing task. For all the parameters other than MVIC torque, there was no significant difference between the conditions at any time point. MVIC torque decreased significantly immediately after the fatiguing task regardless of condition (P < 0.05), and the corresponding decrease in MVIC torque recovered 30 min after the fatiguing task only in AR (P < 0.05). These results suggest an acute positive effect of AR on recovery of neuromuscular function and/or contractile properties after fatigue.

    DOI PubMed

  • Eight-week low-intensity squat training at slow speed simultaneously improves knee and hip flexion and extension strength

    Ryota Akagi, Shinya Sato, Naoya Hirata, Naoto Imaizumi, Hiroki Tanimoto, Ryosuke Ando, Ryoichi Ema, Kosuke Hirata

    Frontiers in Physiology   11   893 - 893  2020  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Considering that the squat exercise requires flexion and extension of the knee and hip joints, a resistance training program based on squat exercises should efficiently increase the flexion and extension strength of both the knee and hip. To our knowledge, however, no study has simultaneously investigated the effects of squat training on both flexion and extension strength in both the knee and hip. Low-intensity squat exercises at slow speeds can be expected to effectively and safely improve knee and hip flexion and extension strength in a wide range of individuals. This study aimed to clarify whether knee and hip flexion and extension strength improved after an 8-week low-intensity squat training program at slow speed. Twenty-four untrained young men were randomly assigned to a training or control group. Participants in the training group performed 40% one-repetition maximum parallel squats at slow speed (4 s for concentric/eccentric actions), 3 days per week for 8 weeks. Before and after the intervention, isometric peak torque of the knee and hip flexors and extensors during maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) was determined. For the knee flexors and extensors, muscle volume was also measured. There were significant training-induced increases in peak torque (P < 0.05). The training effects on knee and hip extension torque (effect size = 0.36-0.38) were higher than those on knee and hip flexion torque (effect size = 0.09-0.13). The squat training used here increased both knee and hip flexion and extension strength, but the training effects on the flexion strength were less than those on the extension strength. Regarding the knee extensors, a significant training-related increase in muscle volume was found (P < 0.05) without neuromuscular adaptations. In addition, there were significant correlations between the training-induced increases in muscle volume and peak torque of KE. These results suggest that muscle hypertrophy may be responsible for increased muscle strength of the knee extensors after an 8-week low-intensity squat training program at slow speed.

    DOI PubMed

  • Nonuniform distribution of passive muscle stiffness within hamstring

    Miyamoto N, Kimura N, Hirata K

    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports    2020  [Refereed]

  • Associations between range of motion and tissue stiffness in young and older people

    Hirata K, Yamadera R, Akagi R

    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   52 ( 10 ) 2179 - 2188  2020  [Refereed]  [International journal]

    Authorship:Lead author, Corresponding author

     View Summary

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the associations between passive ankle dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and stiffness of the triceps surae, sciatic nerve, and deep fascia located in the posterior leg between young and older people. METHODS: Twenty young and twenty older males were recruited and were placed in a prone position with their hip and knee fully extended. Passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM was determined based on the onset of pain during passive dorsiflexion at 1°·s using an isokinetic dynamometer. Shear wave speeds (as a stiffness index) of the triceps surae, the sciatic nerve, and the deep fascia in the posterior leg were evaluated by ultrasound shear wave elastography. RESULTS: The shear wave speeds of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius measured at 15° dorsiflexion correlated negatively with passive ROM in young but not in older participants. The shear wave speed of the sciatic nerve measured at 15° dorsiflexion correlated negatively with passive ROM only in older participants. No association was observed between passive ROM and shear wave speed of the deep fascia in the posterior leg. For data measured at maximal dorsiflexion angle (as an index of stretch tolerance), shear wave speeds of the triceps surae and passive joint torque correlated positively with passive ROM in both groups. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the tissues limiting passive ankle dorsiflexion ROM are muscle and nerve for young and older people, respectively, whereas stretch tolerance influences passive ROM for both groups. This implies that the relative contribution of nonmuscular tissues to joint flexibility become stronger than that of muscles with age.

    DOI PubMed

  • COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism is not associated with passive muscle stiffness and sports-related muscle injury in Japanese athletes.

    Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Naokazu Miyamoto, Hiroshi Kumagai, Kosuke Hirata, Naoki Kikuchi, Hirofumi Zempo, Noriko Kimura, Nobuhiro Kamiya, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Hisashi Naito, Noriyuki Fuku

    BMC medical genetics   20 ( 1 ) 192 - 192  2019.12  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    BACKGROUND: Poor joint flexibility has been repeatedly proposed as a risk factor for muscle injury. The C-to-T polymorphism (rs12722) in the 3'-untranslated region of the collagen type V α1 chain gene (COL5A1) is reportedly associated with joint flexibility. Flexibility of a normal joint is largely determined by passive muscle stiffness, which is influenced by intramuscular collagenous connective tissues including type V collagen. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that the COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism influences joint flexibility via passive muscle stiffness, and is accordingly associated with the incidence of muscle injury. METHODS: In Study 1, we examined whether the rs12722 polymorphism is associated with joint flexibility and passive muscle stiffness in 363 healthy young adults. Joint flexibility was evaluated by passive straight-leg-raise and sit-and-reach tests, and passive muscle stiffness was measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography. In Study 2, the association of the rs12722 polymorphism with sports-related muscle injury was assessed in 1559 Japanese athletes. Muscle injury history and severity were assessed by a questionnaire. In both Study 1 and Study 2, the rs12722 C-to-T polymorphism in the COL5A1 was determined using the TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay. RESULTS: Study 1 revealed that the rs12722 polymorphism had no significant effect on range of motion in passive straight-leg-raise and sit-and-reach tests. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in passive muscle stiffness of the hamstring among the rs12722 genotypes. In Study 2, rs12722 genotype frequencies did not differ between the muscle injury and no muscle injury groups. Moreover, no association was observed between rs12722 polymorphism and severity of muscle injury. CONCLUSIONS: The present study does not support the view that COL5A1 rs12722 polymorphism has a role as a risk factor for sports-related muscle injury, or that it is a determinant for passive muscle stiffness in a Japanese population.

    DOI PubMed

  • Effect of acute eye fatigue on cognition for young females: A pilot study

    Akagi R, Tonotsuka M, Horie R, Hirata K, Ando S

    PeerJ   29 ( 7 ) e7978  2019.10  [Refereed]

  • Moderate associations of muscle elasticity of the hamstring with hip joint flexibility.

    Miyamoto N, Hirata K

    International Journal of Sports Medicine   40 ( 11 ) 717 - 724  2019.10  [Refereed]

  • Muscle stiffness of the vastus lateralis in sprinters and long-distance runners

    Miyamoto N, Hirata K, Inoue K, Hashimoto T

    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise   51 ( 10 ) 2080 - 2087  2019.10  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    PURPOSE: The stiffness of muscle-tendon units and of tendons in the lower legs plays important roles in sprinting and long-distance running. However, the association of muscle stiffness with sprinting and running remains unknown. This study aimed to identify the characteristics of muscle stiffness in sprinters and long-distance runners, and to determine how muscle stiffness is related to the performance of these athletes. METHODS: In 22 male sprinters (SPR group), 22 male long-distance runners (LDR group), and 19 healthy untrained control male subjects (CON group), the muscle shear wave speed (a proxy for stiffness) of the vastus lateralis (VL) was measured under passive (resting) and active (contracting the knee extensors at 50% of maximal voluntary contraction) conditions, by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. RESULTS: The passive VL shear wave speed in SPR group was significantly lower than that in LDR group (P = 0.039). The active VL shear wave speed in LDR group was significantly higher than that in SPR (P = 0.022) and CON (P < 0.001) groups. In SPR group, the 100-m race time was negatively correlated to the passive VL shear wave speed (r = -0.483, P = 0.023) and positively correlated to the active VL shear wave speed (r = 0.522, P = 0.013). In the LDR group, the 5000-m race time was positively correlated to the passive VL shear wave speed (r = 0.438, P = 0.047) but not to the active VL shear wave speed. CONCLUSION: The muscles of sprinters and long-distance runners exhibit characteristic stiffness that can be beneficial to their athletic performance. Passive and active muscle stiffness may play different roles in human locomotion, depending on locomotion speeds.

    DOI PubMed

  • Development of a Promotion System for Home-Based Squat Training for Elderly People.

    Hirasawa Y, Ishioka T, Gotoda N, Hirata K, Akagi R

    Human Interface and the Management of Information   Part II   492 - 501  2019.07  [Refereed]

  • Muscle elasticity under active conditions in human: a methodological comparison

    Miyamoto N, Hirata K

    Translational Sports Medicine   2   138 - 145  2019.01  [Refereed]

  • ESR1 rs2234693 Polymorphism Is Associated with Muscle Injury and Muscle Stiffness.

    Hiroshi Kumagai, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Kosuke Hirata, Naoki Kikuchi, Nobuhiro Kamiya, Seigo Hoshikawa, Hirofumi Zempo, Hisashi Naito, Naokazu Miyamoto, Noriyuki Fuku

    Medicine and science in sports and exercise   51 ( 1 ) 19 - 26  2019.01  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    PURPOSE: Muscle injury is the most common sports injury. Muscle stiffness, a risk factor for muscle injury, is lower in females than in males, implying that sex-related genetic polymorphisms influence muscle injury associated with muscle stiffness. The present study aimed to clarify the associations between two genetic polymorphisms (rs2234693 and rs9340799) in the estrogen receptor 1 gene (ESR1) and muscle injury or muscle stiffness. METHODS: In study 1, a questionnaire was used to assess the muscle injury history of 1311 Japanese top-level athletes. In study 2, stiffness of the hamstring muscles was assessed using ultrasound shear wave elastography in 261 physically active young adults. In both studies, rs2234693 C/T and rs9340799 G/A polymorphisms in the ESR1 were analyzed using the TaqMan SNP Genotyping Assay. RESULTS: In study 1, genotype frequencies for ESR1 rs2234693 C/T were significantly different between the injured and noninjured groups in a C-allele dominant (CC + CT vs TT: odds ratio, 0.62; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.91) and additive (CC vs CT vs TT: odds ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.53-0.91) model in all athletes. In study 2, hamstring muscle stiffness was lower in subjects with the CC + CT genotype than in those with the TT genotype; a significant linear trend (CC < CT < TT) was found (r = 0.135, P = 0.029). In contrast, no associations were observed between ESR1 rs9340799 G/A and muscle injury or stiffness. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that the ESR1 rs2234693 C allele, in contrast to the T allele, provides protection against muscle injury by lowering muscle stiffness.

    DOI PubMed

  • Associations of passive muscle stiffness, muscle stretch tolerance, and muscle slack angle with range of motion: Individual and sex differences

    Naokazu Miyamoto, Kosuke Hirata, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Osamu Yasuda, Hiroaki Kanehisa

    Scientific Reports   8 ( 1 ) 8274  2018.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Joint range of motion (ROM) is an important parameter for athletic performance and muscular injury risk. Nonetheless, a complete description of muscular factors influencing ROM among individuals and between men and women is lacking. We examined whether passive muscle stiffness (evaluated by angle-specific muscle shear modulus), tolerance to muscle stretch (evaluated by muscle shear modulus at end-ROM), and muscle slack angle of the triceps surae are associated with the individual variability and sex difference in dorsiflexion ROM, using ultrasound shear wave elastography. For men, ROM was negatively correlated to passive muscle stiffness of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius in a tensioned state and positively to tolerance to muscle stretch in the medial gastrocnemius. For women, ROM was only positively correlated to tolerance to muscle stretch in all muscles but not correlated to passive muscle stiffness. Muscle slack angle was not correlated to ROM in men and women. Significant sex differences were observed only for dorsiflexion ROM and passive muscle stiffness in a tensioned state. These findings suggest that muscular factors associated with ROM are different between men and women. Furthermore, the sex difference in dorsiflexion ROM might be attributed partly to that in passive muscle stiffness of plantar flexors.

    DOI PubMed

  • Mechanical interaction between neighboring muscles in human upper limb: Evidence for epimuscular myofascial force transmission in humans

    Yasuhide Yoshitake, Daiki Uchida, Kosuke Hirata, Dean L. Mayfield, Hiroaki Kanehisa

    Journal of Biomechanics   74   150 - 155  2018.06  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    To confirm the existence of epimuscular myofascial force transmission in humans, this study examined if manipulating joint angle to stretch the muscle can alter the shear modulus of a resting adjacent muscle, and whether there are regional differences in this response. The biceps brachii (BB: manipulated muscle) and the brachialis (BRA: resting adjacent muscle) were deemed suitable for this study because they are neighboring, yet have independent tendons that insert onto different bones. In order to manipulate the muscle length of BB only, the forearm was passively set at supination, neutral, and pronation positions. For thirteen healthy young adult men, the shear modulus of BB and BRA was measured with shear-wave elastography at proximal and distal muscle regions for each forearm position and with the elbow joint angle at either 100° or 160°. At both muscle regions and both elbow positions, BB shear modulus increased as the forearm was rotated from a supinated to pronated position. Conversely, BRA shear modulus decreased as function of forearm position. The effect of forearm position on shear modulus was most pronounced in the distal muscle region when the elbow was at 160°. The observed alteration of shear modulus of the resting adjacent muscle indicates that epimuscular myofascial force transmission is present in the human upper limb. Consistent with this assertion, we found that the effect of muscle length on shear modulus in both muscles was region-dependent. Our results also suggest that epimuscular myofascial force transmission may be facilitated at stretched muscle lengths.

    DOI PubMed

  • Association analysis of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism with passive muscle stiffness and muscle strain injury.

    N Miyamoto, E Miyamoto-Mikami, K Hirata, N Kimura, N Fuku

    Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports   28 ( 3 ) 1209 - 1214  2018.03  [Refereed]  [International journal]

     View Summary

    Passive muscle stiffness is considered to be a major factor affecting joint flexibility and is thought to relate to the occurrence of muscle strain injury. In skinned muscle fiber experiments, the R577X polymorphism of the α-actinin-3 gene (ACTN3) has been associated with passive muscle stiffness. Our primary purpose was to clarify whether the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism influences passive stiffness of human muscle in vivo. We also examined whether the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism is associated with the occurrence of hamstring strain injury. Seventy-six healthy young male subjects were genotyped for the ACTN3 R577X (rs1815739) polymorphism. Shear modulus (an index of stiffness) of each hamstring muscle (biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus) was assessed using ultrasound shear wave elastography, and history of hamstring strain injury was collected via a questionnaire. The muscle shear moduli of the semitendinosus and semimembranosus were significantly higher in R-allele (RR + RX genotype) carriers than in XX genotype carriers, whereas the shear modulus of the biceps femoris did not differ among the ACTN3 R577X genotypes. Frequency of past hamstring strain injury also did not differ between the 3 genotypes nor between the R-allele and XX genotype carriers. This study indicates that RR and RX genotypes of the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism (corresponding to the presence of α-actinin-3 in type II muscle fibers) are associated with increased passive muscle stiffness of the human hamstring in vivo. However, this altered mechanical property might not affect the risk of hamstring muscle strain injury.

    DOI PubMed

  • Contributions of Hamstring Stiffness to Straight-Leg-Raise and Sit-and-Reach Test Scores

    Naokazu Miyamoto, Kosuke Hirata, Noriko Kimura, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami

    International Journal of Sports Medicine   39 ( 2 ) 110 - 114  2018.02  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The passive straight-leg-raise (PSLR) and the sit-and-reach (SR) tests have been widely used to assess hamstring extensibility. However, it remains unclear to what extent hamstring stiffness (a measure of material properties) contributes to PSLR and SR test scores. Therefore, we aimed to clarify the relationship between hamstring stiffness and PSLR and SR scores using ultrasound shear wave elastography. Ninety-eight healthy subjects completed the study. Each subject completed PSLR testing, and classic and modified SR testing of the right leg. Muscle shear modulus of the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus was quantified as an index of muscle stiffness. The relationships between shear modulus of each muscle and PSLR or SR scores were calculated using Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients. Shear modulus of the semitendinosus and semimembranosus showed negative correlations with the two PSLR and two SR scores (absolute r value≤0.484). Shear modulus of the biceps femoris was significantly correlated with the PSLR score determined by the examiner and the modified SR score (absolute r value≤0.308). The present findings suggest that PSLR and SR test scores are strongly influenced by factors other than hamstring stiffness and therefore might not accurately evaluate hamstring stiffness.

    DOI PubMed

  • No association between passive material property and cross-sectional area in human hamstring

    Hirata K, Miyamoto-Mikami E, Kimura N, Miyamoto N

    The Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine   7 ( 1 ) 35 - 40  2018.01  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

    DOI

  • Associations of maximal voluntary isometric hip extension torque with muscle size of hamstring and gluteus maximus and intra-abdominal pressure

    Kota Tayashiki, Kosuke Hirata, Kiraku Ishida, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Naokazu Miyamoto

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY   117 ( 6 ) 1267 - 1272  2017.06  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Purpose Muscle size of the hamstring and gluteus maximus (GM) as well as intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) are considered as factors affecting the torque development during hip extension. This study examined the associations of torque development during maximal voluntary isometric hip extension with IAP and muscle size of the hamstring and GM.
    Methods Anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) of the hamstring and thickness of GM were determined in 20 healthy young males using an ultrasonography apparatus (Experiment 1). Torque and IAP were simultaneously measured while subjects performed maximal voluntary isometric hip extension. The IAP was measured using a pressure transducer placed in the rectum and determined at the time at which the developed torque reached to the maximal. In Experiment 2, torque and IAP were measured during maximal voluntary isometric hip flexion in 18 healthy young males.
    Results The maximal hip extension torque was significantly correlated with the IAP (r = 0.504, P = 0.024), not with the ACSA of the hamstring (r = 0.307, P = 0.188) or the thickness of GM (r = 0.405, P = 0.076). The relationship was still significant even when the ACSA of the hamstring and the thickness of GM were adjusted statistically (r = 0.486, P = 0.041). The maximal hip flexion torque was not significantly correlated with the IAP (r = -0.118, P = 0.642).
    Conclusion The current results suggest that IAP can contribute independently of the muscle size of the agonists to maximal voluntary hip extension torque.

    DOI PubMed

  • Effects of marathon running on muscle damage in lower limb muscle groups and maximal aerobic capacity in novice recreational runners

    Fuminori Takayama, Kosuke Hirata, Yoshiharu Nabekura, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Naokazu Miyamoto

    Gazzetta Medica Italiana Archivio per le Scienze Mediche   176 ( 3 ) 100 - 109  2017.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Background: The purpose of the present study was to reveal the muscle-related difference in the recovery of muscle damage of lower limb muscles and the changes in maximal aerobic capacity after marathon running in recreational runners. METHODS: Before (PRE), and 1 (POST1), 2 (POST2), and 3 (POST3) days after marathon running, maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque in each of knee extension (KE), knee flexion (KF), and plantar flexion (PF), creatine kinase (CK) activity, and perceived muscle soreness of lower limb were measured in 7 male college novice recreational runners (goal time: 4 h 30 min 50 s ± 58 min 25 s). To investigate the changes in maximal aerobic capacity, the treadmill running test was performed at PRE and POST3. RESULTS: KE and KF MVC torque values were significantly (P&lt
    0.05) reduced at POST1 and POST2 and at POST1, respectively, whereas there was no significant main effect of day in PF MVC torque. CK activity was significantly (P&lt
    0.01) increased at POST1 and POST2. For the perceived muscle soreness, there were significant (P&lt
    0.01) changes only in the knee extensors. For the treadmill running test, there were no significant differences in all the variables between PRE and POST3. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that, in recreational runners, muscle damage induced by marathon running is greater and prolonged in the knee extensors than in the plantar flexors and hamstring. Moreover, it is suggested that the muscle damage of lower limb muscles and maximal aerobic capacity were recovered within 3 days after marathon running.

    DOI

  • Acute effect of static stretching on passive stiffness of the human gastrocnemius fascicle measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography

    Kosuke Hirata, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Naokazu Miyamoto

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY   117 ( 3 ) 493 - 499  2017.03  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    Passive muscle stiffness and muscle architecture at a given joint angle, as well as slack angle of the muscle have been shown to change after an acute bout of stretching. However, it remains unclear whether passive muscle stiffness at a given fascicle length is reduced after stretching. We aimed to elucidate the acute effect of static stretching on the passive fascicle stiffness using ultrasound shear wave elastography.
    Shear modulus, fascicle length, and slack angle of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) as well as passive plantar flexion torque during passive dorsiflexion were measured before and after a 5-min static stretching in 14 healthy males.
    After stretching, passive torques were significantly reduced at &gt; 50% of range of motion (ROM). Shear modulus at a given fascicle length was significantly reduced at &gt; 80% of the change in fascicle length during passive dorsiflexion. Slack angle of MG was observed at the middle part of ROM and significantly shifted toward more dorsiflexed position after stretching.
    The present study showed the significant effectiveness of static stretching on the passive fascicle stiffness. Furthermore, the present results suggest that both the shift in slack angle and the reduction in passive fascicle stiffness contribute to produce the change in passive torque-joint angle relationship during passive dorsiflexion. Notably, the contribution of the reduced passive fascicle stiffness to the decrease in passive torque is substantial over the latter part of ROM.

    DOI PubMed

  • Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers

    N. Miyamoto, K. Hirata, H. Kanehisa

    Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports   27 ( 1 ) 99 - 106  2017.01  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles’ stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

    DOI PubMed

  • Muscle-specific acute changes in passive stiffness of human triceps surae after stretching

    Kosuke Hirata, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Naokazu Miyamoto

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY   116 ( 5 ) 911 - 918  2016.05  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    Purpose It remains unclear whether the acute effect of stretching on passive muscle stiffness differs among the synergists. We examined the muscle stiffness responses of the medial (MG) and lateral gastrocnemii (LG), and soleus (Sol) during passive dorsiflexion before and after a static stretching by using ultrasound shear wave elastography.
    Methods Before and after a 5-min static stretching by passive dorsiflexion, shear modulus of the triceps surae and the Achilles tendon (AT) during passive dorsiflexion in the knee extended position were measured in 12 healthy subjects.
    Results Before the static stretching, shear modulus was the greatest in MG and smallest in Sol. The stretching induced significant reductions in shear modulus of MG, but not in shear modulus of LG and Sol. The slack angle was observed at more plantar flexed position in the following order: AT, MG, LG, and Sol. After the stretching, the slack angles of each muscle and AT were significantly shifted to more dorsiflexed positions with a similar extent. When considering the shift in slack angle, the change in MG shear modulus became smaller.
    Conclusion The present study indicates that passive muscle stiffness differs among the triceps surae, and that the acute effect of a static stretching is observed only in the stiff muscle. However, a large part of the reduction of passive muscle stiffness at a given joint angle could be due to an increase in the slack length.

    DOI PubMed

  • 大学生市民ランナーのマラソンレースが筋損傷指標と有酸素性能力に与える影響

    髙山史徳, 平田浩祐, 森寿仁, 鍋倉賢治, 宮本直和

    ランニング学研究   27   47 - 58  2016.02  [Refereed]

  • Evidence for intermuscle difference in slack angle in human triceps surae

    Kosuke Hirata, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Naokazu Miyamoto

    JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS   48 ( 6 ) 1210 - 1213  2015.04  [Refereed]

    Authorship:Lead author

     View Summary

    This study examined whether the slack angle (i.e., the joint angle corresponding to the slack length) varies among the synergists of the human triceps surae in vivo. By using ultrasound shear wave elastography, shear modulus of each muscle of the triceps surae was measured during passive stretching from 50 degrees of plantar flexion in the knee extended position at an angular velocity of 1 degrees/s in 9 healthy adult subjects. The slack angle of each muscle was determined from the ankle joint angle-shear modulus relationship as the first increase in shear modulus. The slack angle was significantly greater in the medial gastrocnemius (20.7 +/- 6.7 degrees plantarflexed position) than in the lateral gastrocnemius (14.9 +/- 6.7 degrees plantarflexed position) and soleus (2.0 +/- 4.8 degrees dorsiflexed position) and greater in the lateral gastrocnemius than in the soleus. This study provided evidence that the slack angle differs among the triceps surae; the medial gastrocnemius produced passive force at the most plantarflexed position while the slack angle of the soleus was the most dorsiflexed position. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI PubMed

  • Validity of Measurement of Shear Modulus by Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography in Human Pennate Muscle

    Naokazu Miyamoto, Kosuke Hirata, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Yasuhide Yoshitake

    PLOS ONE   10 ( 4 ) e0124311  2015.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Ultrasound shear wave elastography is becoming a valuable tool for measuring mechanical properties of individual muscles. Since ultrasound shear wave elastography measures shear modulus along the principal axis of the probe (i.e., along the transverse axis of the imaging plane), the measured shear modulus most accurately represents the mechanical property of the muscle along the fascicle direction when the probe's principal axis is parallel to the fascicle direction in the plane of the ultrasound image. However, it is unclear how the measured shear modulus is affected by the probe angle relative to the fascicle direction in the same plane. The purpose of the present study was therefore to examine whether the angle between the principal axis of the probe and the fascicle direction in the same plane affects the measured shear modulus. Shear modulus in seven specially-designed tissue-mimicking phantoms, and in eleven human in-vivo biceps brachii and medial gastrocnemius were determined by using ultrasound shear wave elastography. The probe was positioned parallel or 20 degrees obliquely to the fascicle across the B-mode images. The reproducibility of shear modulus measurements was high for both parallel and oblique conditions. Although there was a significant effect of the probe angle relative to the fascicle on the shear modulus in human experiment, the magnitude was negligibly small. These findings indicate that the ultrasound shear wave elastography is a valid tool for evaluating the mechanical property of pennate muscles along the fascicle direction.

    DOI PubMed

  • INFLUENCE OF THE INTENSITY OF SQUAT EXERCISES ON THE SUBSEQUENT JUMP PERFORMANCE

    Atsuki Fukutani, Seiichiro Takei, Kosuke Hirata, Naokazu Miyamoto, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Yasuo Kawakami

    JOURNAL OF STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING RESEARCH   28 ( 8 ) 2236 - 2243  2014.08  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Jump performance can be enhanced after performing squat exercises, and this is thought to be because of the phenomenon of postactivation potentiation (PAP). However, the influence of the intensity of squat exercises on jump performance enhancement and its association to PAP have not been elucidated. Thus, we examined the influence of the intensity of squat exercises on the subsequent jump performance and the magnitude of PAP. Eight weightlifters (age, 19.8 +/- 1.3 years; height, 1.67 +/- 0.07 m; body mass, 77.1 +/- 14.8 kg) were recruited as subjects. The intensity of squat exercises was set in 2 conditions: heavy condition (HC) (45% 1 repetition maximum [1RM] x 5 repetitions [reps], 60% 1RM x 5 reps, 75% 1RM x 3 reps, and 90% 1RM x 3 reps) and moderate condition (MC) (45% 1RM x 5 reps, 60% 1RM x 5 reps, and 75% 1RM x 3 reps). Before and after the squat exercises, the subjects performed countermovement jumps 3 times. In addition, a twitch contraction was concurrently elicited before and after the squat exercises. In both conditions, twitch torque and jump height recorded after the squat exercises increased significantly compared with those recorded beforehand. The extents of increase in both twitch torque and jump height were significantly larger in HC than in MC. We conclude therefore that a high-intensity squat exercise is better than a moderate-intensity squat exercise as a warm-up modality for enhancing subsequent jump performance.

    DOI PubMed

  • Effect of conditioning contraction intensity on postactivation potentiation is muscle dependent

    Atsuki Fukutani, Kosuke Hirata, Naokazu Miyamoto, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Toshimasa Yanai, Yasuo Kawakami

    JOURNAL OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND KINESIOLOGY   24 ( 2 ) 240 - 245  2014.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    We aimed to examine whether the influence of conditioning contraction intensity on the extent of post-activation potentiation (PAP) is muscle dependent. Eleven healthy males performed both thumb adduction and plantar flexion as a conditioning contraction. The conditioning contraction intensities were set at 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, or 100% of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC).
    Before and after the conditioning contraction, twitch torque was measured for the respective joint to calculate the extent of PAP. In plantar flexion, the extent of PAP became significantly larger as the conditioning contraction intensity increased up to 80% MVC (p &lt; 0.05). In contrast, the extent of PAP in thumb adduction increased significantly only up to 60% MVC (p &lt; 0.05), but not at higher intensities.
    These results indicate that the influence of the conditioning contraction intensity on the extent of PAP is muscle dependent. Our results suggest that a conditioning contraction with submaximal intensity can sufficiently evoke sizable PAP in the muscle where most of muscle fibers are recruited at submaximal intensities, thereby attenuating muscle fatigue induced by the conditioning contraction. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI PubMed

  • 骨盤の傾斜角度が最大随意膝関節伸展トルクに及ぼす影響

    江間諒一, 平田浩祐, 若原卓, 金久博昭, 川上泰雄

    バイオメカニクス研究   16 ( 2 ) 74 - 81  2012.07  [Refereed]

  • Effect of pressure intensity of graduated elastic compression stocking on muscle fatigue following calf-raise exercise

    Naokazu Miyamoto, Kosuke Hirata, Naotoshi Mitsukawa, Toshimasa Yanai, Yasuo Kawakami

    JOURNAL OF ELECTROMYOGRAPHY AND KINESIOLOGY   21 ( 2 ) 249 - 254  2011.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of wearing a graduated elastic compression (EC) stocking, with different pressure profiles during a fatiguing calf-raise exercise session, on the torque generating capacity after exercise. Fourteen subjects performed 15 sets of 10 repetitions of calf-raise exercise, wearing one of three stockings of different compression pressure profiles: two kinds of EC stockings (one (EC30) with 30 mm Hg at the ankle, 21-25 mm Hg at the calf, and 10 mm Hg below the knee, and the other (EC18) with 18, 12-14, and 7 mm Hg at the same regions, respectively) and a non-EC sport stocking as a control (CON). Before and after the exercise, torque and electromyographic (EMG) signals of medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were recorded during an evoked triplet contraction and the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). All stockings had no effect on the decline of the MVC torque whereas the reduction of the evoke triplet torque in EC30 stocking condition was significantly smaller compared with that in CON (-6.4 +/- 8.5% for EC30 and -16.5 +/- 9.0% for CON, P &lt; 0.05). The reduction of the mean power frequency of EMG during MVC in the EC30 condition was significantly smaller than that in CON (-4.4 +/- 10.9 Hz for EC30 and -18.7 +/- 7.9 Hz for CON, P &lt; 0.05). These results suggest that the EC stocking with adequate pressure at the calf region relieves muscle fatigue of the triceps surae induced by calf-raise exercise. (C) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    DOI PubMed

  • 段階的弾性圧迫ストッキングの着用が歩行中の足関節底屈筋群の血液量・筋活動および主観的疲労度に与える影響

    光川眞壽, 宮本直和, 平田浩祐, 利光徹哉, 川村明, 福永哲夫, 川上泰雄

    スポーツ科学研究   6   88 - 96  2009.11  [Refereed]

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Misc

  • 連載【関節機能の強化について考える】第3回 関節柔軟性を向上させるストレッチ

    平田浩祐, 宮本直和

    体育の科学   71 ( 10 )  2021.10  [Invited]

    Authorship:Lead author

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

  • 連載【関節機能の強化について考える】第2回 関節柔軟性と筋・腱のかかわり

    平田浩祐, 宮本直和

    体育の科学   71 ( 9 ) 671 - 676  2021.09  [Invited]

    Authorship:Lead author

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

  • 連載【関節機能の強化について考える】第1回 関節機能とその評価法

    宮本直和, 平田浩祐

    体育の科学   71 ( 8 ) 597 - 601  2021.08  [Invited]

    Authorship:Last author

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

  • 特集【変わりゆくスポーツと科学 パート44】超音波エラストグラフィ機能を用いた筋の硬さの評価:スポーツ現場での応用可能性

    赤木亮太, 平田浩祐, 中村雅俊, 宮本直和

    Strength & Conditioning Journal Japan   27 ( 6 ) 2 - 12  2020.07  [Invited]

    Article, review, commentary, editorial, etc. (scientific journal)  

  • Hamstring muscle damage induced by eccentric knee flexion exercises: Difference between synergist muscles

    ASANO Tomoyuki, SHOJI Mikio, KANDA Akihiro, KANDA Akihiro, EMA Ryoichi, HIRATA Kosuke, HIRATA Kosuke, AKAGI Ryota

    Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine   9 ( 6 )  2020

    J-GLOBAL

  • Can a 1-week oral administration of propolis positively affect muscle fatigue and recovery?

    TSUCHIYA Yuma, HIRATA Naoya, SATO Shinya, IKEGUCHI Kazuya, ASAMA Takashi, OSAKABE Naomi, HIRATA Kosuke, AKAGI Ryota

    Journal of Physical Fitness and Sports Medicine   9 ( 6 )  2020

    J-GLOBAL

  • サルコペニア・フレイル予防のための在宅トレーニング法確立に向けた基盤創成

    赤木 亮太, 平田 浩祐, 宮本 直和, 吉田 司

    特別教育・研究報告集     275 - 278  2019

    CiNii

  • Influence Of Intensity Of Conditioning Contraction On The Extent Of Postactivation Potentiation Is Muscle Dependent

    Atsuki Fukutani, Kosuke Hirata, Naokazu Miyamoto, Hiroaki Kanehisa, Toshimasa Yanai, Yasuo Kawakami

    MEDICINE AND SCIENCE IN SPORTS AND EXERCISE   44   637 - 637  2012.05

    Research paper, summary (international conference)  

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Awards

  • 第34回日本トレーニング科学会大会奨励賞

    2021.11   日本トレーニング科学会   在宅での自重トレーニングが高齢者の筋パワー及び骨格筋細胞量にもたらす効果:膝関節伸展筋群を対象として

    Winner: 野村祐太, 伊藤真理, 土屋勇真, 川島千穂, 大庭功將, 山田陽介, 吉田司, 平田浩祐, 赤木亮太

  • 大塚スポーツ医・科学賞 奨励賞

    2017.09   日本体力医学会   エストロゲン受容体遺伝子多型は筋スティフネスおよび肉離れ受傷リスク

    Winner: 熊谷仁, 平田浩祐, 膳法浩史, 木村範子, 宮本(三上)恵里, 宮本直和, 福典之

  • 第27回日本トレーニング科学会大会実行委員会特別賞

    2014.11   日本トレーニング科学会   1回の練習セッションによるドロップジャンプパフォーマンスと筋腱相互作用の変化

    Winner: 清水美奈, 平山邦明, 岩沼総一朗, 江間諒一, 平田浩祐, 川上泰雄

Research Projects

  • 皮膚のストレッチが骨格筋にもたらす効果とは?-超音波剪断波エラストグラフィによる検討-

    中富健康科学振興財団  中富健康科学振興財団 研究助成金

    Project Year :

    2021.04
    -
    2023.03
     

    赤木亮太

  • 高齢者の柔軟性改善策の確立に向けた基盤創成:軟組織の硬さに着目して

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費(基盤研究B)

    Project Year :

    2022.04
    -
     
     

    平田 浩祐, 赤木亮太

  • 座位姿勢における動的バランス能力と体幹筋横断面積の関係の解明-チェアスキー競技におけるパフォーマンス向上を目指して-

    公益財団法人石本記念デサントスポーツ科学振興財団  公益財団法人 石本記念デサントスポーツ科学振興財団 研究助成金

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
    2020.03
     

    赤木亮太

  • 運動誘発性筋損傷に対する筋の硬さの影響とストレッチング効果の検討

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費(若手研究)

    Project Year :

    2019.04
    -
     
     

    平田 浩祐

  • 高齢者の柔軟性の規定因子の解明および効果的なストレッチング方法の確立

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費 (特別研究員奨励費)

    Project Year :

    2018.04
    -
     
     

    平田 浩祐

  • ストレッチングにより関節柔軟性が向上する機序解明と効果的なストレッチング法の考案

    日本学術振興会  科学研究費助成事業

    Project Year :

    2015.04
    -
    2017.03
     

    福永哲夫

  • 超音波剪断波イメージング法によるマラソン後の筋損傷部位および程度の定量~適切なトレーニングおよびリカバリープログラムの作成に向けて~

    公益財団法人 石本記念デサントスポーツ科学振興財団  第37回 公益財団法人 石本記念デサントスポーツ科学振興財団 研究助成金

    Project Year :

    2015.04
    -
    2016.03
     

    平田 浩祐

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Specific Research

  • 高齢者の柔軟性改善策の確立に向けた基盤創成:軟組織の硬さに着目して

    2021   平山, 赤木

     View Summary

    関節柔軟性は関節に跨る組織の力学的特性の影響を受けると考えられ,その最たるものは筋である.しかし,高齢者の関節柔軟性においては,筋ではなく神経の硬さの影響が強い可能性が示されている.また,高齢者に対する柔軟性向上運動が軟組織の硬さに及ぼす影響は十分に検討されていない.そこで本研究は,静的ストレッチングが高齢者の筋および神経の硬さに及ぼす影響を検討した.その結果,ストレッチングによる関節可動域の改善が認められた一方で,明確な筋及び神経の硬さの低下は認められないことが示された.今後,高齢者の柔軟性改善に資する更なる介入研究が必要である.

  • 運動誘発性筋損傷に対する筋の硬さの影響とストレッチング効果の検討

    2021  

     View Summary

    運動誘発性筋損傷は激しい運動により生じ,筋肉痛の発生および筋機能の低下を伴う.よって,その影響因子の特定や効果的な軽減方法が求められている.本研究は,筋の硬さと運動誘発性筋損傷の程度の関連およびストレッチングによる運動誘発性筋損傷の軽減効果について,若年男性のハムストリングを対象に検討した.その結果,運動誘発性筋損傷による半腱様筋の硬さの上昇と筋力の低下に相関関係が認められた.また,運動誘発性筋損傷を生じさせる伸張性運動の直前に実施した静的ストレッチングは,運動誘発性筋損傷の程度を軽減させないことが示唆された.

 

Syllabus