Updated on 2021/12/05

写真a

 
KOBAYASHI, Maori
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Human Sciences, School of Human Sciences
Job title
Assistant Professor(without tenure)

Degree

  • 博士(心理学)

 

Research Areas

  • Human interface and interaction

  • Database

  • Cognitive science

  • Experimental psychology

Papers

  • Acoustic features in speech for emergency perception

    Maori Kobayashi, Yasuhiro Hamada, Masato Akagi

    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America   144 ( 3 ) 1835 - 1835  2018.09  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • 避難呼びかけ音声の心理的評価

    小林まおり, 赤木正人

    日本音響学会誌   74 ( 12 )  2018  [Refereed]

    J-GLOBAL

  • Auditory impression of sounds produced by flutes in a concert hall

    小林 まおり, 上野 佳奈子

    日本音響学会誌   73 ( 4 ) 212 - 220  2017.04  [Refereed]

    DOI CiNii

  • Study on method for protecting speech privacy by actively controlling speech transmission index in simulated room.

    Masashi Unoki, Yuta Kashihara, Maori Kobayashi, Masato Akagi

    2017 Asia-Pacific Signal and Information Processing Association Annual Summit and Conference, APSIPA ASC 2017, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, December 12-15, 2017     1199 - 1204  2017  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Effects of Auditory-Somatosensory Interactions on Auditory Distance Discrimination Accuracy(<Special issue>VR Psychology VI)

    Kondo Yuji, Teramoto Wataru, Kobayashi Maori, Otani Makoto

    Transactions of the Virtual Reality Society of Japan   21 ( 1 ) 49 - 52  2016.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The present study investigated how somatosensory stimuli influence auditory distance perception, by manipulating spatial and temporal consistency between these stimuli. Auditory stimuli were presented in participants&#039; rear space through a dynamic binaural virtual auditory display, while somatosensory stimuli were presented via small electric fans (i.e., air current stimuli). Participants performed an auditory distance discrimination task. Results showed that auditory distance discriminability was decreased when the somatosensory and auditory stimuli occurred at the same time but different azimuthal angles. In contrast, the discriminability was maintained when both stimuli occurred at the same azimuthal angle. These results suggest the contribution of somatosensory cues to auditory distance perception.

    DOI CiNii

  • Measurement of Mirror Neuron System Activation for the 3-Dimensional Reproduction Sound Fields(<Special issue>VR Psychology VI)

    Kobayashi Maori, Tsuchida Koichiro, Ueno Kanako, Shimada Sotaro

    Transactions of the Virtual Reality Society of Japan   21 ( 1 ) 73 - 79  2016.03  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    In this study, we examined whether the activation of the mirror neuron system is influenced by the spatial accuracy of sound field reproduction using an auditory virtual reality system. In the experiment, we measured the brain activity during listening to action-related and nonaction-related sounds with electroencephalography using mu rhythm suppression as an index of motor cortical activation. Also, we set three sound reproduction conditions: &#039;spatialized (valid)&#039;, &#039;non-spatialiezed (invalid)&#039; and &#039;monaural&#039; conditions. In both spatialized and non-spatialized condition, the sound stimuli were presented through 96-ch. loud speakers. The results showed that the mu-suppression for action-related sounds was significantly larger in the spatialized sound conditions than the non-spatialized and the monaural conditions, and suggested that the mirror neuron activation was influenced by the spatial accuracy of sound field reproduction. These results suggest the possibilities to use mirror neuron activation as an objective measure for &#039;plausibility illusion&#039; of virtual reality systems.

    DOI CiNii

  • The effects of spatialized sounds on the sense of presence in auditory virtual environments: A psychological and physiological study

    Maori Kobayashi, Kanako Ueno, Shiro Ise

    Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments   24 ( 2 ) 163 - 174  2015.05  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    © 2015 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Although many studies have indicated that spatialized sounds increase the subjective sense of presence in virtual environments, few studies have examined the effects of sounds objectively. In this study, we examined whether three-dimensional reproduced sounds increase the sense of presence in auditory virtual environments by using physiological and psychological measures. We presented the sounds of people approaching the listener through a three-dimensional reproduction system using 96 loudspeakers. There were two spatial sound conditions, spatialized and non-spatialized, which had different spatial accuracy of the reproduction. The experimental results showed that presence ratings for spatialized sounds were greater than for non-spatialized sounds. Further, the results of the physiological measures showed that the sympathetic nervous system was activated to a greater extent by the spatialized sounds compared with the non-spatialized sounds, and the responses to the three-dimensional reproduced sounds were similar to those that occur during intrusions into personal space in the real world. Additionally, a correlation was found between the psychological and the physiological responses in the spatialized sound condition. These results suggest that the physiological measures correlate to the perceived presence in acoustic environments.

    DOI

  • Sound field reproduction and sharing system based on the boundary surface control principle

    Akira Omoto, Shiro Ise, Yusuke Ikeda, Kanako Ueno, Seigo Enomoto, Maori Kobayashi

    ACOUSTICAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY   36 ( 1 ) 1 - 11  2015  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    In this paper, we introduce a newly developed sound-field-reproducing and - sharing system. The system consists of an 80-channel fullerene-shaped microphone array and a 96-channel loudspeaker array mounted in an enclosure called a sound cask, so named because of its shape. The cask has two functions. First, it functions as a precise sound field reproduction system. The sound signals acquired from a microphone array in any sound field can be reproduced in the sound cask after passing through filters that modify the amplitude and phase on the basis of the boundary surface control principle. The large number of loudspeakers result in the precise orientation and depth of sound images. Second, it functions as a platform for a sound-field-sharing system. Several casks located remotely can appear to exist in the same sound field for subjects inside a cask. In addition, the cask is large enough for one to be able to play a musical instrument inside it. The musical sound or voices produced by subjects can be shared by subjects in a distant cask after convoluting the impulse responses of the original sound field. The concept of the system is explained in detail.

    DOI CiNii

  • Classification of Reproduced Sound Contents for 3-D Reproduction Sound Systems

    KOBAYASHI MAORI, FUKUI MAKOTO, UENO KANAKO

    日本バーチャルリアリティ学会論文誌   19 ( 1 ) 37 - 45  2014.03  [Refereed]

    DOI J-GLOBAL

  • Vision contingent auditory pitch aftereffects

    Wataru Teramoto, Maori Kobayashi, Souta Hidaka, Yoichi Sugita

    EXPERIMENTAL BRAIN RESEARCH   229 ( 1 ) 97 - 102  2013.08  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Visual motion aftereffects can occur contingent on arbitrary sounds. Two circles, placed side by side, were alternately presented, and the onsets were accompanied by tone bursts of high and low frequencies, respectively. After a few minutes of exposure to the visual apparent motion with the tones, a circle blinking at a fixed location was perceived as a lateral motion in the same direction as the previously exposed apparent motion (Teramoto et al. in PLoS One 5:e12255, 2010). In the present study, we attempted to reverse this contingency (pitch aftereffects contingent on visual information). Results showed that after prolonged exposure to the audio-visual stimuli, the apparent visual motion systematically affected the perceived pitch of the auditory stimuli. When the leftward apparent visual motion was paired with the high-low-frequency sequence during the adaptation phase, a test tone sequence was more frequently perceived as a high-low-pitch sequence when the leftward apparent visual motion was presented and vice versa. Furthermore, the effect was specific for the exposed visual field and did not transfer to the other side, thus ruling out an explanation in terms of simple response bias. These results suggest that new audiovisual associations can be established within a short time, and visual information processing and auditory processing can mutually influence each other.

    DOI PubMed

  • Subjective evaluation of a virtual acoustic system: Trials with three-dimensional sound field reproduced by the 'Sound Cask'

    Maori Kobayashi, Kanako Ueno, Mai Yamashita, Shiro Ise, Seigo Enomoto

    Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics   19  2013  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    It has been necessary to establish subjective measures for the performance of the virtual acoustic systems. In this paper, we report our trials to evaluate the performance of a three-dimensional sound field reproduction system based on the boundary surface control principle, the 'Sound Cask'. First, we introduce our investigations for the experts of audio engineering in order to clarify the difference of auditory impression between the Sound Cask and conventional audio systems. Second, we report psychological and physiological experiments focusing on the advantageous points of the Sound Cask, localization performance and a clear sense of reality, that were pointed out in the investigations for the experts. Finally, we discuss the issues to be considered for subjective evaluation of virtual acoustic systems for future studies. © 2013 Acoustical Society of America.

    DOI

  • Effect of Flanking Sounds on the Auditory Continuity Illusion

    Maori Kobayashi, Makio Kashino

    PLOS ONE   7 ( 12 ) e51969  2012.12  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Background: The auditory continuity illusion or the perceptual restoration of a target sound briefly interrupted by an extraneous sound has been shown to depend on masking. However, little is known about factors other than masking.
    Methodology/Principal Findings: We examined whether a sequence of flanking transient sounds affects the apparent continuity of a target tone alternated with a bandpass noise at regular intervals. The flanking sounds significantly increased the limit of perceiving apparent continuity in terms of the maximum target level at a fixed noise level, irrespective of the frequency separation between the target and flanking sounds: the flanking sounds enhanced the continuity illusion. This effect was dependent on the temporal relationship between the flanking sounds and noise bursts.
    Conclusions/Significance: The spectrotemporal characteristics of the enhancement effect suggest that a mechanism to compensate for exogenous attentional distraction may contribute to the continuity illusion.

    DOI PubMed

  • Consideration of effective acoustic rendering of spatialized ambient sound

    Yukio Iwaya, Takeru Chiba, Makoto Otani, Satoshi Yairi, Maori Kobayashi, Yoiti Suzuki

    Interdisciplinary Information Sciences   18 ( 2 ) 93 - 98  2012.12  [Refereed]

    DOI

  • Sound Frequency and Aural Selectivity in Sound-Contingent Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Maori Kobayashi, Wataru Teramoto, Souta Hidaka, Yoichi Sugita

    PLOS ONE   7 ( 5 ) e36803  2012.05  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Background: One possible strategy to evaluate whether signals in different modalities originate from a common external event or object is to form associations between inputs from different senses. This strategy would be quite effective because signals in different modalities from a common external event would then be aligned spatially and temporally. Indeed, it has been demonstrated that after adaptation to visual apparent motion paired with alternating auditory tones, the tones begin to trigger illusory motion perception to a static visual stimulus, where the perceived direction of visual lateral motion depends on the order in which the tones are replayed. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unclear. One important approach to understanding the mechanisms is to examine whether the effect has some selectivity in auditory processing. However, it has not yet been determined whether this aftereffect can be transferred across sound frequencies and between ears.
    Methodology/Principal Findings: Two circles placed side by side were presented in alternation, producing apparent motion perception, and each onset was accompanied by a tone burst of a specific and unique frequency. After exposure to this visual apparent motion with tones for a few minutes, the tones became drivers for illusory motion perception. However, the aftereffect was observed only when the adapter and test tones were presented at the same frequency and to the same ear.
    Conclusions/Significance: These findings suggest that the auditory processing underlying the establishment of novel audiovisual associations is selective, potentially but not necessarily indicating that this processing occurs at an early stage.

    DOI PubMed

  • Indiscriminable sounds determine the direction of visual motion

    Maori Kobayashi, Wataru Teramoto, Souta Hidaka, Yoichi Sugita

    SCIENTIFIC REPORTS   2   365  2012.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    On cross-modal interactions, top-down controls such as attention and explicit identification of cross-modal inputs were assumed to play crucial roles for the optimization. Here we show the establishment of cross-modal associations without such top-down controls. The onsets of two circles producing apparent motion perception were accompanied by indiscriminable sounds consisting of six identical and one unique sound frequencies. After adaptation to the visual apparent motion with the sounds, the sounds acquired a driving effect for illusory visual apparent motion perception. Moreover, the pure tones with each unique frequency of the sounds acquired the same effect after the adaptation, indicating that the difference in the indiscriminable sounds was implicitly coded. We further confrimed that the aftereffect didnot transfer between eyes. These results suggest that the brain establishes new neural representations between sound frequency and visual motion without clear identification of the specific relationship between cross-modal stimuli in early perceptual processing stages.

    DOI PubMed

  • Sound-contingent visual motion aftereffect

    Souta Hidaka, Wataru Teramoto, Maori Kobayashi, Yoichi Sugita

    BMC NEUROSCIENCE   12   44  2011.05  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Background: After a prolonged exposure to a paired presentation of different types of signals (e. g., color and motion), one of the signals (color) becomes a driver for the other signal (motion). This phenomenon, which is known as contingent motion aftereffect, indicates that the brain can establish new neural representations even in the adult&apos;s brain. However, contingent motion aftereffect has been reported only in visual or auditory domain. Here, we demonstrate that a visual motion aftereffect can be contingent on a specific sound.
    Results: Dynamic random dots moving in an alternating right or left direction were presented to the participants. Each direction of motion was accompanied by an auditory tone of a unique and specific frequency. After a 3-minutes exposure, the tones began to exert marked influence on the visual motion perception, and the percentage of dots required to trigger motion perception systematically changed depending on the tones. Furthermore, this effect lasted for at least 2 days.
    Conclusions: These results indicate that a new neural representation can be rapidly established between auditory and visual modalities.

    DOI PubMed

  • Temporal Characteristics of the Ventriloquism Effect

    KOBAYASHI MAORI, FUJII SHINJI, FUJII SHINJI, IWAYA YUKIO, IWAYA YUKIO, SAKAMOTO SHUICHI, SAKAMOTO SHUICHI, SUZUKI YOICHI, SUZUKI YOICHI

    日本バーチャルリアリティ学会論文誌   16 ( 1 ) 93 - 97  2011.03  [Refereed]

    DOI J-GLOBAL

  • The effects of ambient sounds on the quality of 3D virtual sound space

    Satoshi Yairi, Yukio Iwaya, Maori Kobayashi, Makoto Otani, Yôiti Suzuki, Takeru Chiba

    IIH-MSP 2009 - 2009 5th International Conference on Intelligent Information Hiding and Multimedia Signal Processing     1122 - 1125  2009  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    Immersive sound spaces which are synthesized using virtual reality techniques have recently been developed to realize highly realistic telecommunication interactions. In real world soundscapes the sounds we usually listen to include background or "ambient" sounds such as the sounds of the ventilation system in a room. However, current virtual auditory display systems generate point sound sources which are often attributed to specific object locations. Therefore, it is possible to reproduce sound direction, but no information about the sound space is included. As a result, the sound output is often dry and unnatural. In this research, a rendering method for ambient sounds and its effects are investigated. An optimum rendering algorithm of ambient sounds is proposed and its effects on the quality of sound space are examined. © 2009 IEEE.

    DOI

  • Effects of frequency-modulated sounds on the perceived magnitude of self-motion induced by vestibular information

    Mikio Seto, Shuichi Sakamoto, Maori Kobayashi, Kenzo Sakurai, Jiro Gyoba, Yo-iti Suzuki

    Proc. of 3rd International Symposium on Medical, Bio- and Nano-Electronics in Sendai   P-32   173 - 174  2008.03

  • LogPCM及びADPCMへのMultiple Descriptionスカラ量子化の適用

    WEY Ho‐seok, 西村竜一, 伊藤彰則, 小林まおり, 鈴木陽一, 鈴木陽一

    電子情報通信学会論文誌 A   J90-A ( 12 ) 918 - 921  2007.12  [Refereed]

    J-GLOBAL

  • The effect of a flashing visual stimulus on the auditory continuity illusion

    Maori Kobayashi, Yoshihisa Osada, Makio Kashino

    PERCEPTION & PSYCHOPHYSICS   69 ( 3 ) 393 - 399  2007.04  [Refereed]

     View Summary

    The effect of a visual stimulus on the auditory continuity illusion was examined. Observers judged whether a tone that was repeatedly alternated with a band-pass noise was continuous or discontinuous. In most observers, a transient visual stimulus that was synchronized with the onset of the noise increased the limit of illusory continuity in terms of maximum noise duration and maximum tone level. The smaller the asynchrony between the noise onset and the visual stimulus onset, the larger the visual effect on this illusion. On the other hand, detection of a tone added to the noise was not enhanced by the visual stimulus. These results cannot be fully explained by the conventional theory that illusory continuity is created by the decomposition of peripheral excitation produced by the occluding sound.

    PubMed

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Misc

  • Study on speech privacy protection by controlling speech transmission index in simulated room (応用音響)

    UNOKI Masashi, KASHIHARA Yuta, KOBAYASHI Maori, AKAGI Masato

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告 = IEICE technical report : 信学技報   117 ( 328 ) 95 - 100  2017.11

    CiNii

  • Psychological evaluation of evacuation calls

      117 ( 170 ) 55 - 60  2017.08

    CiNii

  • Study on modeling of room impulse response and its room acoustic characteristics

    鵜木 祐史, 石川 大介, 柏原 佑太, 小林 まおり, 赤木 正人

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告 = IEICE technical report : 信学技報   116 ( 303 ) 79 - 84  2016.11

    CiNii

  • 話者の動きの音響情報は実在感を高める―立体音場再生装置を用いた検討―

    小林まおり, 大石悠貴, 榎本成悟, 北川智利, 上野佳奈子, 伊勢史郎, 柏野牧夫

    日本音響学会研究発表会講演論文集(CD-ROM)   2012   ROMBUNNO.3-Q-3  2012.03

    J-GLOBAL

  • Effects of the movement of speakers on the sense of presence : A study by using the three-dimensional sound field reproduction system

      42 ( 1 ) 41 - 46  2012.02

    CiNii

  • Perceptual effect of ambient sound on 3D virtual sound space

      39 ( 5 ) 379 - 384  2009.08

    CiNii

  • Perceptual Effect of Ambient Sound on 3D Virtual Sound Space

    OTANI Makoto, IWAYA Yukio, KOBAYASHI Maori, YAIRI Satoshi, SUZUKI Yoiti, CHIBA Takeru

    Technical report of IEICE. EA   109 ( 166 ) 49 - 54  2009.07

     View Summary

    In real world, we hear various sounds including ambient sounds which, for example, are radiated from ventilation systems. However, most of currently developed virtual auditory displays can reproduce point sources which are attributable to specific objects&#039; location, but cannot such ambient sounds. This results in an unnatural sound space, which leads to a degradation of the presented sound space quality. In this paper, we propose a rendering method of ambient sounds, and report the results of investigation of effects of rendered ambient sounds on a perception of sound space.

    CiNii

  • 連続聴効果に妨害音のタイミングの予測性が及ぼす影響

    小林まおり, 柏野牧夫, 鈴木陽一

    日本音響学会研究発表会講演論文集(CD-ROM)   2009   ROMBUNNO.2-Q-7  2009.03

    J-GLOBAL

  • Effects of frequency-changed and amplitude-changed sounds on the perceived self-motion induced by vestibular information

    SAKAMOTO SHUICHI, SETO MIKIO, KOBAYASHI MAORI, IWAYA YUKIO, SAKURAI KENZO, GYOBA JIRO, SUZUKI YOICHI

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告   108 ( 356(HIP2008 123-148) ) 19 - 23  2008.12

    J-GLOBAL

  • Effects of implicit learning on the auditory continuity illusion

      38 ( 6 ) 627 - 631  2008.10

    CiNii

  • The effect of sequential grouping of tones on synchrony perception of auditory and audio-visual stimuli

      38 ( 3 ) 285 - 290  2008.05

    CiNii

  • Effects of frequency-modulated sounds corresponding to self-motion acceleration on the magnitude of self-motion perception

    SETO Mikio, SAKAMOTO Shuichi, KOBAYASHI Maori, SAKURAI Kenzo, GYOBA Jiro, SUZUKI Yoiti

    Technical report of IEICE. HIP   107 ( 369 ) 153 - 158  2007.11

     View Summary

    Self-motion perception is well known as a typical the multi-modal perceptual phenomenon. Recent studies showed that self-motion perception is evoked not only by visual information, but also by auditory information. However, most of these studies reported the relationship between auditory spatial information and self-motion. In this study, we focused on the effect of frequency shift induced by moving object on self-motion perception. Through the two experiments, we consider about the effects of frequency-shift sound and the effects of adaptation to audio-vestibular stimuli. As a result, when...

    CiNii

  • Effects of frequency-modulated sounds corresponding to self-motion acceleration on the magnitude of self-motion perception

    SETO MIKIO, SAKAMOTO SHUICHI, KOBAYASHI MAORI, SAKURAI KENZO, GYOBA JIRO, SUZUKI YOICHI

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告   107 ( 369(HIP2007 129-158) ) 153 - 158  2007.11

    J-GLOBAL

  • Effects of FM sounds on cyclical backward-forward self-motion

      37 ( 8 ) 633 - 638  2007.10

    CiNii

  • 不規則に提示された妨害音が連続聴錯覚に及ぼす効果

    小林まおり, 柏野牧夫

    日本音響学会研究発表会講演論文集(CD-ROM)   2007   2-Q-22  2007.03

    J-GLOBAL

  • 音声符号化へのMD量子化の適用に関する基礎的検討

    WEY H., 西村竜一, 伊藤彰則, 小林まおり, 鈴木陽一

    日本音響学会研究発表会講演論文集(CD-ROM)   2007  2007

    J-GLOBAL

  • The effect of irregular interruption on the auditory continuity illusion

    KOBAYASHI MAORI, KOBAYASHI MAORI, KASHINO MAKIO

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告   106 ( 410(HIP2006 67-98) ) 81 - 86  2006.11

    J-GLOBAL

  • 視覚フラッシュが連続聴錯覚に及ぼす効果(日本基礎心理学会第23回大会,大会発表要旨)

    小林 まおり, 長田 佳久, 柏野 牧夫

    基礎心理学研究   23 ( 2 )  2005

    CiNii

  • The effect of a flashing visual stimulus on the auditory continuity illusion

    小林 まおり, 長田 佳久, 柏野 牧夫

    聴覚研究会資料 = Proceedings of the auditory research meeting   34 ( 9 ) 639 - 645  2004.11

    CiNii

  • The effects of auditory stream segregation on the visual detection task.

    KOBAYASHI MAORI, OSADA YOSHIHISA

    電子情報通信学会技術研究報告   103 ( 522(HIP2003 90-99) ) 19 - 23  2003.12

    J-GLOBAL

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