Updated on 2024/07/20

写真a

 
PITARCH , Pau
 
Affiliation
Faculty of Letters, Arts and Sciences, School of Culture, Media and Society
Job title
Associate Professor
Degree
PhD ( Columbia University )

Research Experience

  • 2017.09
    -
    Now

    Waseda University   Faculty of Letters, Arts, and Sciences   Associate Professor

  • 2015.09
    -
    2017.08

    CUNY Queens College   Department of Classical, Middle Eastern, and Asian Languages and Cultures   Assistant Professor

Education Background

  • 2009.09
    -
    2015.10

    Columbia University   East Asian Languages and Cultures   PhD  

  • 2007.04
    -
    2009.03

    The University of Tokyo   Language and Information Sciences   MA  

Research Areas

  • Japanese literature   Modern Japanese Literature

Research Interests

  • Popular Culture

  • Comparative Literature

  • Media Studies

  • Modern Japanese Literature

 

Papers

  • “Abnormal Genealogies: Diagnosing the Writer in 1920s Japan”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Modernism/modernity Print Plus    2020  [Refereed]  [Invited]  [International journal]

  • "Art, Labor, and Utopia in the Early Fiction and Criticism of Satō Haruo"

    PITARCH, Pau

    Waseda RILAS Journal   ( 7 ) 223 - 233  2019.10  [Refereed]

  • "The Translation of Japanese Literature in Spain"

    PITARCH, Pau

    Waseda RILAS Journal   ( 6 ) 49 - 54  2018.10  [Invited]

  • "The translation of Japanese Literature in Spain"

    PITARCH, Pau

    Transcultural Studies   ( 7 ) 44 - 52  2018.02  [Invited]

  • “Teatralidad y auto-invención en la ficción de juventud de Tanizaki Jun’ichirō”

    PITARCH, Pau

    El Archipiélago: Ensayos para una historia cultural del Japón     99 - 111  2018  [Invited]

  • “A Superfool Always Dreaming of the Future: Akutagawa Ryūnosuke's Retelling of the Life of Christ in 'Saihō no hito' ”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Religion and Spirituality in Japanese Literature: Proceedings of the Association for Japanese Literary Studies   16   85 - 98  2016

  • Cultivated Madness: Aesthetics, Psychology and the Literary Market in Modern Japan

    PITARCH, Pau

    Columbia University    2015.10  [Refereed]

  • “The Artist as Criminal in the Taishō-era Fiction of Tanizaki Jun’ichirō”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Asia and Africa across Disciplinary and National Lines     99 - 103  2015

  • “The Gold Standard: Performing Genius in the Early Fiction of Tanizaki Jun’ichirō”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Performance and Japanese Literature: Proceedings of the Association for Japanese Literary Studies   15   125 - 135  2014

  • “Género y fantasía épica”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Género y cultura popular. Estudios culturales 1     33 - 63  2008  [Invited]

  • “Akujo ni tsuite: veintisiete narraciones en busca de una identidad”

    PITARCH, Pau

    La mujer japonesa: realidad y mito     401 - 414  2008

  • “Las armas del martirio. Una lectura del misticismo en Dulce dueño (1911) de Emilia Pardo Bazán”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Las hijas de Eva: historia, tradición, simbología     183 - 195  2006

  • “Degeneración, decadencia y otras imágenes de la enfermedad. Tres ejemplos de la crítica del Fin de Siglo”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Corporizar el pensamiento. Escrituras y lecturas del cuerpo en la cultura occidental     53 - 69  2006  [Refereed]  [Invited]

  • "La caja negra del País de las maravillas. Literatura popular y metáforas de la identidad en Haruki Murakami"

    Pau Pitarch

    Literatura y cultura popular en el nuevo milenio: actas del II Congreso Internacional de la Sociedad Española de Estudios Literarios de Cultura Popular (SELICUP)     951 - 962  2006

  • “Perspectivas sobre la virginidad en “Homemade” de Ian McEwan”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Los habitos del deseo: formas de amar en la modernidad     321 - 325  2005  [Refereed]

  • “Què fa un andrògin com tu en un planeta com aquest? Alteritat, ciència-ficció i gènere a The Left Hand of Darkness d’Ursula K. Le Guin,”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Lectora   11   157 - 169  2005  [Refereed]  [Invited]

  • “La ‘mujer superior’ modernista en El jardín del amor (1902)”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Actas del IV Seminario Asociacion Universitaria de Estudios de las Mujeres, Sevilla 17-19 de octubre de 2002    2003

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Books and Other Publications

  • Nuevas aproximaciones a la literatura japonesa (New Approaches to Japanese Literature)

    PITARCH, Pau( Part: Edit)

    Bellaterra  2020

  • Història del Japó (History of Japan)

    PITARCH, Pau, with Oriol Junqueras, Dani Madrid, Guillermo Martínez( Part: Joint author)

    UOC  2011

  • Mujeres en Asia Oriental (Women in East Asia)

    PITARCH, Pau( Part: Edit)

    Lectora, no. 16  2010

  • Pasen y vean. Estudios corporales (Come in and See. Body Studies)

    PITARCH, Pau, with Isabel Clúa( Part: Joint editor)

    UOC  2008

  • Los habitos del deseo: formas de amar en la modernidad

    PITARCH, Pau, with Carme Riera, Meri Torras, Isabel Clúa( Part: Joint editor)

    Ex-cultura  2005

Presentations

  • “The Afterlives of Akutagawa Ryūnosuke in the Japanese Empire”

    ピタルク パウ

    Pacific Ancient and Modern Language Association 

    Presentation date: 2022.11

  • “Recentering Ōtsuka Kusuoko (1875-1910)”

    ピタルク パウ

    Cultural Typhoon 

    Presentation date: 2022.09

  • “A Tortured Genius in the Metropolis: The Media-Generated Authorial Persona of Chŏng Yŏn-gyu (1899–1979)”

    ピタルク パウ

    Modern Languages Association International Symposium 

    Presentation date: 2022.06

  • “Class, Ethnicity, and Genius in the Early Canon-Building of Proletarian Literature: The Case of Chŏng Yŏn-gyu (1899-1979)”

    ピタルク パウ

    European Association for Japanese Studies 

    Presentation date: 2021.08

  • “Tracing Embodied History in “Jokaisen kitan” (1925) by Satō Haruo”

    Pau Pitarch

    Association for Asian Studies in Asia 

    Presentation date: 2020.09

    Event date:
    2020.08
    -
    2020.09
  • “Facing Each Other Stark Naked: Taishō-Era Biographies and the Author as Modern Hero”

    PITARCH, Pau

    22nd Asian Studies Conference Japan 

    Presentation date: 2018.06

  • “Shimada Seijirō or the Author in the Age of Mass Production"

    PITARCH, Pau

    Autorías encarnadas/Embodied Authorship 

    Presentation date: 2018.04

  • “Rioting Sickness: The Aesthetics of Mental Disability in the Short Fiction of Okamoto Kanoko (1889-1939)”

    PITARCH, Pau

    American Comparative Literature Association 

    Presentation date: 2018.03

  • “Narcissism as Genius in the Short Fiction of Okamoto Kanoko (1889-1939)”

    PITARCH, Pau

    American Association of Teachers of Japanese 

    Presentation date: 2018.03

  • “Artistic Creativity as Pathology in Hentai sakkashi (1926)”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Association for Asian Studies 

    Presentation date: 2015.03

  • A Sick Youth Corroded by His Visions: The Writer as Morbid Genius In the Literary Columns of Hentai shinri (1917-1926)”

    PITARCH, Pau

    New York Conference on Asian Studies 

    Presentation date: 2013.09

  • “Barbarism begins at home: Colonialism and modernization in Satō Haruo’s writings on Taiwan”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Pacific Solutions 

    Presentation date: 2011.12

  • “A Cosmopolitan in the Colonies. Satō Haruo’s Writings on Taiwan”

    PITARCH, Pau

    15th Asian Studies Conference Japan 

    Presentation date: 2011.06

  • “Aestheticist Utopia in Satō Haruo’s “Beautiful Town” ”

    PITARCH, Pau

    12th International Conference of the European Association for Japanese Studies 

    Presentation date: 2008.09

  • “Art as Utopian Space in the Early Criticism of Satō Haruo”

    PITARCH, Pau

    12th Asian Studies Conference Japan 

    Presentation date: 2008.06

  • ““Inocular la novedad”: algunos usos del cuerpo enfermo en la crítica finisecular”

    PITARCH, Pau

    Literaturas comparadas: Teoría, métodos y aplicaciones 

    Presentation date: 2006.03

  • “La Caja Negra del País de las Maravillas. Literatura popular y metáforas de la identidad en Haruki Murakami,”

    PITARCH, Pau

    II International Conference of the Spanish Society of Popular Culture and Literature 

    Presentation date: 2005.10

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Syllabus

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Internal Special Research Projects

  • Literary Biography and the Invention of the Modern Author in Taisho Japan

    2020  

     View Summary

    Between the Meiji and Shōwa eras there is an essential change in the way literary authorship is conceptualized, that is patently visible in biographical narratives of modern authors. A good term of comparison for these biographical narratives are memorializations of Meiji authors that are generally centered around relationships of personal acquaintance, and emphasize master and disciple networks, and the tightly knit communities around coterie journals and other similar venues for and by writers. By contrast, Taishō biographies of writers emphasize the value of their objects’ lives as models, if not always for behavior, very often for a modern artistic sensibility that the public could participate in through their life and work. Taishō biographers, often aspiring authors themselves, argue their suitability to present the lives of their objects to the public, not because they were present in the private moments of the biography’s subjects, but because they shared with them a unique artistic sensibility through a certain fraternity of artists beyond personal connections. These features point to a conception of authorship based around individual sensibility and creativity that would supersede the relationships of mentorship and patronage that had dominated the literary world in the Meiji era.

  • Literary Biografhy and the Invention of the Modern Author in Taisho Japan

    2020  

     View Summary

    Between the Meiji and Shōwa eras there is an essential change in the way literary authorship is conceptualized, that is patently visible in biographical narratives of modern authors. A good term of comparison for these biographical narratives are memorializations of Meiji authors that are generally centered around relationships of personal acquaintance, and emphasize master and disciple networks, and the tightly knit communities around coterie journals and other similar venues for and by writers. By contrast, Taishō biographies of writers emphasize the value of their objects’ lives as models, if not always for behavior, very often for a modern artistic sensibility that the public could participate in through their life and work. Taishō biographers, often aspiring authors themselves, argue their suitability to present the lives of their objects to the public, not because they were present in the private moments of the biography’s subjects, but because they shared with them a unique artistic sensibility through a certain fraternity of artists beyond personal connections. These features point to a conception of authorship based around individual sensibility and creativity that would supersede the relationships of mentorship and patronage that had dominated the literary world in the Meiji era.

  • Mental Abnormality and the Female Artistic Genius in the Works of Okamoto Kanoko(1889-1939)

    2017  

     View Summary

    Author Okamoto Kanoko (1889-1939) shared with many of her contemporaries a deep interest in the connections between mental abnormality and artistic creativity. Okamoto herself had first-hand experience of internment in a facility for mental patients, but her essays and autobiographical writings rarely mention this episode, and certainly do not exploit it in the creation of her artistic persona. Gendered attitudes towards mental health probably lie at the root of this difference: a female writer like Okamoto would pay a much steeper price in her public image if she flirted with motifs of mental abnormality in her personal branding.In her fiction, on the other hand, I identify a common pattern in which mental illness occupies a central place in the process of artistic creation, but always split into two different characters whose relationship becomes the center of the story. One of the characters then experiences these pathological states vicariously through the other and derives their creativity at least partly from them, participating in the genealogy of the “mad artist” but without necessarily displaying the full effects of mental illness. It is possible to assume that, having had first-hand experience of mental illness herself, Okamoto would not be so cavalier about its consequences.